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Keywords: Poetry

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Unsent letter

    • Jamie Dawe
    • 02 June 2022

    It was wrong to expect her to wade through the river of sadness of family obligations / Right person, wrong timing and I turned away / I have sought to explain myself by searching / 15 years later it is seemly to vanquish the letter / Guaranteed, she found someone somewhere better.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The content of our winter

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 24 May 2022
    1 Comment

    Next week we officially enter winter. The associations of winter are largely negative. They mourn the loss of the summer that has passed. For that reason it may seem incongruous that winter should begin immediately after a Federal Election campaign that ended with the excitement of the people’s choice of a new Government. The potential for a new beginning might fit better with spring.

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  • MEDIA

    Welcome to Eureka Street Plus

    • David Halliday
    • 06 May 2022

    It seems every fifteen years or so Eureka Street has something to announce. There was 1991, when Eureka Street launched, 2006 with the switch from print to digital, and now, the next chapter in the Eureka Street journey. After 15 years of being a free digital magazine, we are quietly overjoyed to be launching Eureka Street Plus, an expanded content offering for paid subscribers.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    After the truths are told

    • Dean Ashenden
    • 03 May 2022
    4 Comments

      The danger is that unless commissions and inquiries are accompanied by other ways of telling other truths they will inadvertently help to shrink that national story into the story of victims who in fact have never been only victims, and of unmentioned perpetrators who in fact have never been only perpetrators. They risk preaching to a more-or-less converted majority and to an implacably unconverted minority.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Soldiering on with COVID

    • Angela Costi
    • 26 April 2022

    We are told by the government and associated authorities that these are times of ‘personal responsibility’. This is undoubtedly a major transition from the heavy regulated existence not that long ago when the collective good outweighed individualism. Juxtaposed with this ‘forging forth’ expectation is the significant, if not alarming, increase in infection rates. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Carrying the weight of the daily news

    • Cherie Gilmour
    • 29 March 2022

    A house bursts into flames as it’s submerged in floodwaters. A doctor tells a cameraman filming a dying Ukrainian child to send the footage to Putin. A newspaper delves into the murder of a young woman. It’s like a fever dream: a pandemic bleeds into the edges of a global war. The news presents information, and it has no moral duty to tell us how we should feel about it or help us untangle the knot of feelings which emerge. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Winging it

    • Julian Wood
    • 28 March 2022

    Beyond, the Hampstead houses / dipped their heads in the water / and drank long and slow / as if in companionship. At last the pond darkened / beneath evening clouds / And we rose to go, / Leaving behind the precious crumbs / The birds had waited all day for.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Tolstoy’s war

    • Philip Harvey
    • 03 March 2022
    12 Comments

      One of the most memorable scenes in Russian literature relates the thoughts of a man lying on the ground staring at the sky in the middle of a major European battle. Prince Andrei Bolkonsky is wounded. He is placed in a situation where, instead of running, fighting, and thinking every moment might be his last, he is suddenly met with silence, grandeur, tranquillity.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Another slow Saturday morning

    • John Cranmer
    • 28 February 2022

    There continues / right NOW / to be / an iconic presencing / to a slow —- light-bright / Saturday Morning.  Bread / with locally-crafted /  marmalade. Knife licked / with a subtle delight / Such a delicate art this!

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Across the machair

    • Lorraine Gibson
    • 15 February 2022

    Fellow traveller, I urge you / do not simply skirt the margins: / stride out across the machair, touch / freedom’s fruitful fabric. / By all means mosey / around the material: But, / for the love of God, always / digress, digress, digress.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Eureka Street farewells Philip Harvey

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 14 February 2022
    4 Comments

    Philip Harvey has been poetry editor of Eureka Street since its early days. Now he has decided that it is time for him to step down from his position in favour of a younger editor. I appreciate the thoughtfulness and generosity of his decision though I feel deeply his loss to us. And I am grateful to him all that he has given to Eureka Street of his skills and of himself, all on an almost honorary basis.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Thinking through language: Editing poetry in Eureka Street

    • Philip Harvey
    • 02 February 2022
    2 Comments

      I was invited to read the poetry at Eureka Street by Morag Fraser, sometime in the mists. She shouted me coffee at the Chinese place across Victoria Street from the magazine’s Richmond offices. That was nearly twenty years ago. As we crunched on fortune cookies, she popped the question. I’ve been editing poetry at Eureka Street ever since and have only chosen to let go of the job this summer.  

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