keywords: Student Id

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • INTERNATIONAL

    Selective evidence

    • Steven Churches
    • 14 May 2006

    Was the decision to deny the Bakhtiyaris refugee status based on all the facts?

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The politics of aid

    • Francesca Beddie
    • 14 May 2006

    Francesca Beddie discovers much of interest in Daniel Oakman’s Facing Asia: A History of the Colombo Plan.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Jeb Bartlet for president

    • Juliette Hughes
    • 08 May 2006

    ‘We live in the time where we have fictitious election results that elect a fictitious president’, said Michael Moore at the 2003 Academy Awards. Nothing has happened yet.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The human side of poverty

    • Liz Curran
    • 27 April 2006

    So often in the poverty debate the actual human stories have been lost.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Let them pick fruit

    • Vivienne Cowburn
    • 13 October 2020
    18 Comments

    An idea that’s gaining traction, in a pandemic where international travel has stopped and many Australians are losing their jobs, is this notion that the unemployed (aka: everyone on JobSeeker payments) should go out into the regions and help the farmers pick fruit.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The romance of the song

    • Brian Matthews
    • 06 October 2020
    10 Comments

    He came in, sat down, and we talked about Henry Lawson. He was well read in the field, having encountered Lawson not only in a small way at school but especially at home where his mother had given him an anthology of Australian stories and he’d come across ‘The Drover’s Wife’. We hit it off: he was pleasant, engaging and witty and we resolved to continue our talk in the near future.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Putting a value on a human life

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 01 October 2020
    7 Comments

    The response to COVID has invited reflection about the relative value of one human death (and so of one human life) as compared with another. This is a radical question because it makes us ask whether the value of a human life is defined by economic wellbeing and by potential contribution to the economy, or by deeper qualities.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Actually, my illness does define me

    • Tim Hutton
    • 01 October 2020
    7 Comments

    For many people, illness has a narrative: a clear beginning, middle and end. If we’re lucky, the ending is actually a fresh start where the illness is gone and our hero is returned to normal life, changed but stronger because of their ordeals. In the lives of those with chronic illness, however, those lines are blurred; our descent into illness may have been gradual and there might be no end in sight.

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  • RELIGION

    The Catholic Church and modern science

    • Bill Uren
    • 15 September 2020
    142 Comments

    Whereas the Vatican II document sought to engage with, and to respect, the autonomy of the modern world and its science, only too many of the Vatican’s official statements over the past fifty years have effectively resiled from that commitment.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Why I won’t be signing petitions about the Aboriginal flag

    • Brooke Ottley
    • 25 August 2020
    15 Comments

    If you’re mad about some white people controlling the use of the Aboriginal flag, there are some things you should know. This is not a clear-cut case of white people trying to exploit Aboriginal culture or intellectual property for multiple reasons.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The art of storytelling

    • Julie Perrin
    • 18 August 2020
    31 Comments

    The capacity to story our experience is a powerful tool for reflection and understanding. As adults we learn that no story is pure and we are capable of telling ourselves spin, but the shaping of experience into story is the bread and butter of our lives. Narrative, it has been said, is a primary act of mind.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Autistic representation and Love on the Spectrum

    • Alex Creece
    • 11 August 2020
    6 Comments

    With all its good intentions and charming participants, Love on the Spectrum is for the neurotypical eye. Just like The Undateables, a similar show from the UK, it takes the inner machinations of disabled lives and creates entertainment for non-disabled viewers. Autistic representation on television is rare, which makes it all the more alienating when these few depictions exist purely for everyone else’s warm-n-fuzzies.

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