keywords: Way Of Death

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    My September of grief

    • Katherine Richardson
    • 26 September 2019
    8 Comments

    Before that first September, my experience with grief was fairly limited. I was no stranger to death, but I hadn't yet felt the type of grief that makes you ache in places you never realised sadness could reach. My first experience with this was September 2014.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Robodebt at the vanguard of government power grab

    • Kate Galloway
    • 12 September 2019
    7 Comments

    A policy genuinely in support of moving into employment would not seek to capitalise on the ambiguity of accounting in the year of transition from welfare to work — which is effectively what robodebt does.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Day inquest highlights threat of police profiling

    • Celeste Liddle
    • 07 September 2019
    3 Comments

    As an Aboriginal woman walking the streets at night, I am significantly more concerned about being brutalised by those charged to keep our streets safe — the police — than I am about any fellow lone wanderer on the streets. The case of Tanya Day and the response to it reinforced to me that my fears were well-founded.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Death and drones in the Mediterranean

    • Ramona Wadi
    • 23 August 2019
    4 Comments

    Opting for surveillance of migrants instead of rescue operations will result in death by drowning, or torture and possible deaths in Libya. For both scenarios, the EU has cultivated its own brand of impunity. Looking away has become politically acceptable, and the bloc can focus on funding the Libyan Coast Guard to do its dirty work.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    The scorching of Timor-Leste

    • Tammy Pemper
    • 23 August 2019
    3 Comments

    I stood to continue on foot around the UN compound. I kept walking, ignoring the screaming, the shooting, the panic. Timorese looked to us. I needed to give them hope. I took motivation from them. More than that, I wanted to stay on my feet. I required time to respond and do what I could when the end came.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The secretive business of detention dirty work

    • Meg Mundell
    • 21 August 2019
    8 Comments

    If you're not burdened by a conscience, it's a perfect get-rich-quick scheme: offer 'garrison' services to governments reluctant to get their hands dirty. Ensure the vulnerable people you 'manage' are hidden, demonised by politicians and right-wing commentators. Hire cheap labour, minimise your tax, and make millions.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The sometimes ironic perception of 'things'

    • Brian Matthews
    • 02 August 2019
    4 Comments

    Robert Harris' The Gang of One ranges through Harris' five published books and a number of uncollected poems. Early work grows from his occasionally lonely, knockabout life and reveals not only a talent for catching the essence of fleeting memories and perceptions but also a mordant touch that gives edge to memory.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Check for symptoms of internalised misogyny

    • Vivienne Cowburn
    • 25 July 2019
    8 Comments

    The fight for equality is an external, social, economic and political battlefield. Sometimes the fight is in our own heads, and we can internalise some of that misogyny. In between tearing each other down, putting dinner on and exercising some self-loathing while we're at it, how can one find the time to identify all of the ways a person can internalise the patriarchy?

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    St Augustine's parable of the deer

    • Ted Witham and Eric D. Nelson
    • 29 April 2019
    3 Comments

    'Another thing you should note about the deer,' Augustine gestures to the crowd. 'They cross a stream in single file. One deer lays its head on the back of its forerunner, and the leader changes place often. In these ways they carry one another's load and show us how to bear burdens of our sisters and brothers.'

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  • EDUCATION

    Business thinking is death to the humanities

    • David James
    • 16 April 2019
    25 Comments

    Here's a suggestion. In order to halt the seemingly inexorable destruction of the humanities in our secondary schools, we should immediately sack any senior Education Department bureaucrat who has an MBA. Or perhaps they can be forced to reapply, unsuccessfully, for their old jobs. They like that kind of thing.

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  • RELIGION

    The disruptiveness of an election year Easter

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 15 April 2019
    2 Comments

    This year both the public and the Christian Easter are overshadowed by the forthcoming election. In the public world election means that assured people choose their rulers. In the Christian story election means that desperate people are chosen. Each kind of election has its place.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Kafka in Australia: the trial of Witness K

    • Susan Connelly
    • 06 April 2019
    18 Comments

    Our own version of Kafka's The Trial is being played out under our very noses. 'Witness K' and his lawyer Bernard Collaery have been charged with making known Australian state secrets in connection with ASIS spying on Timor-Leste. The similarities between the plights of Kafka's Josef K and Witness K do not end with their names.

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