section: Arts And Culture

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Philosophy of food

    • Mark Chou
    • 27 October 2010
    6 Comments

    Epicurus makes clear that food is pleasurable to the extent that it satiates a need. My dad's longing for the foods of childhood has nothing to do with bodily hunger, and everything to do with remembrance of his childhood in Taiwan and of his parents.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Church tourist

    • Michael Sharkey
    • 26 October 2010

    Reflecting on the brutal way the hierarchy treated her, I see the logic of the place she holds in this ambiguous space. Born in murderous times among such vicious things as men become where power is at stake, she stands among the metal, glass and stone ...

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Career criminal's uneasy redemption

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 21 October 2010

    Doug experiences for the first time guilt and empathy for one of his victims, as Claire confides in him the trauma of her kidnapping. It awakens in him a desire to be redeemed from his previous life. But redemption must be earned.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Insect empathy

    • Chris Wallace-Crabbe and Margaret Cameron
    • 19 October 2010

    Industrious servant of excellent fame .. You sting to protect the hive, then you die ... Instinct is such an unworthy name .. Which calls a selfless attitude, a lie.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Serious business for children

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 15 October 2010
    4 Comments

    The suffering of children opens a door into the hardness of society. Think about the experience of the Stolen Generations, the detention of asylum seeker children, the sexual abuse of children. Societies try to close doors that open on to vulnerability.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    What to do when trapped underground

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 14 October 2010

    The other people in Paul's life exist only as disembodied voices from a mobile phone, set adrift in the box in which he is trapped. This may be taken as an allegory for modern communication, where handheld electronic devices are the primary conduit to networks of interaction and intimacy. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Subterranean interrogation

    • Vin Maskell
    • 13 October 2010
    7 Comments

    'Excuse me,' the young man says. I meet his brown eyes. Pondering how many coins I have in my pocket I note his tidy hair, olive T-shirt, well-fitting jeans, coloured sneakers. Maybe he just wants to ask about the next train. He is perspiring a little. 'Can I talk to you?' he asks.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Anti-valentine

    • Aidan Coleman
    • 12 October 2010
    2 Comments

    You say to leave roses .. for the overcrowded arms of bikies .. You pop inflatable hearts and cut the strings .. of pink and stodgy cherubs .. You shoot down my skywriting plane mid-cliché .. This is not our day.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    When kids turn evil

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 07 October 2010
    2 Comments

    Lacking the wisdom of experience and anything resembling a positive adult role model, Owen is guided by a yearning for companionship and a budding adolescent libido. These are very human impulses, but no substitute for wise adult guidance or a fully formed moral compass.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Fanatic's football fairytale

    • Brian Matthews
    • 06 October 2010
    1 Comment

    Fiction writers have to arrange events so that they achieve the required outcome without stretching credulity. Yet real life routinely throws up sequences so bizarre that a fiction writer wouldn't dare to own them. Try this one. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Memo to corporate pigs

    • Ouyang Yu and Barry Gittins
    • 05 October 2010
    4 Comments

    No good deed goes unplagiarised; no noteworthy scheme leaves the department unharvested. Lack the intellectual capital to spend on an informed decision? Set multiple minions to work then cherry pick the outcomes, signing off with your own trotter.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The roots of American arrogance

    • Ben Coleridge
    • 01 October 2010
    9 Comments

    America has grown so used to triumphing in the conflicts of the 1990s that mere stasis is now easily viewed as retreat. But from Teddy Roosevelt to Barack Obama, each time America has become blind to the limitations of its power, it has been wrenched back to reality by failure.

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