section: Arts And Culture

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Fruit half-eaten by animals

    • Libby Hart and Belinda Rule
    • 13 April 2010
    2 Comments

    Lift up a stone, find a spider, fat as a grape ... Run, and I will be tucked up in the heel of your shoe, gnawing at the lining.  

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The mutant homeless

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 08 April 2010

    In comics, the X-Men's 'mutant' powers make them the target of bigotry. They function as a metaphor for homosexuals and other persecuted minorities. In Micmacs, Bazil, ostracised from his 'normal' life by a bizarre crisis, also finds himself on the margins of society.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The joys and risks of reading in bed

    • Brian Doyle
    • 07 April 2010
    5 Comments

    As a society we fail our children if we do not carefully remove our street clothes, don cotton pyjamas, and crawl into the boat of the bed with a sigh of delight, each and every night, there to voyage, UnKindled, BlackBerryless, PalmPilotless, into the glory of story.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Not-quite-right freedom from hunger

    • Anthony Lynch
    • 06 April 2010
    3 Comments

    He walked with his back hunched, his lowered head inches above his toes. As if he feared cavities or his own anonymity. That black dog stopping at every fence post.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hitting back at the men who hate women

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 01 April 2010

    Youthful hacker Lisbeth Sallander is capable of great violence. But often her violence is a response to that which has been inflicted upon her. Her investigation of a decades old missing person case will test her capacity for mercy.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Scenes from a Chinese milk bar

    • Vin Maskell
    • 31 March 2010
    11 Comments

    The Chinese couple had kept the shop going for ten years at a time when milk bars have been disappearing off the map. In my two decades in this suburb about eight corner shops have closed. And in the past three years Peter's milk bar, like his wife, was just hanging on.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A bishop's first education

    • Brian Doyle
    • 30 March 2010
    13 Comments

    Augustine. Wondrous lesson, that man, but he has been imprisoned by theology. Grant me chastity but not yet, everyone knows that hilarious remark.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Beyond the global storytelling crisis

    • Colm McNaughton
    • 29 March 2010
    10 Comments

    It is becoming clear that we are probably not going to avert cataclysmic forms of climate change. The foundational Greek and Hebraic imaginaries, the mythical narratives that frame western civilisation, can no longer contain, inform and explain what we experience. We need new stories.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Cate Blanchett, Peter Garrett and other endangered creatures

    • Brian Matthews
    • 25 March 2010
    5 Comments

    Few people give a toss about Bilbies, the Arts or Heritage, but the moment someone rediscovers them and deems them indispensable, only to find that Bilbies are disappearing and Arts and Heritage are in palliative care, Garrett's a goner — again.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The ant's prayer

    • Vinay Verma
    • 23 March 2010

    As angels of innocence cast .. Imperfect shadows .. God idioms are intoned .. Perfunctory .. As morning ablutions .. Disciples invoking pacts of compromise .. Offering souls and solutions .. Silent in their conspiracy

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Germaine Greer's utopia

    • Jasmine-Kim Westendorf
    • 22 March 2010
    13 Comments

    Some say that not only is The Female Enuch of little relevance today: it never was relevant. Such arguments are often based more on attacks on Greer personally, and feminism generally, than considered critiques of the value of the feminist agenda set out in the book.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    New ways of talking about God

    • Philip Harvey
    • 19 March 2010
    2 Comments

    The poet Rainer Maria Rilke's 'God', writes Stephanie Dowrick, 'is a vulnerable neighbour one moment, like a clump of a hundred roots the next; an ancient work of art, then a much-needed hand, a cathedral, a dreamer. Absent here, breath-close there; as often in darkness as in light.'

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