section: Arts And Culture

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    When adults fail children

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 20 May 2010
    1 Comment

    A scene where Connor carries Mia, who pretends to sleep, to her bedroom and removes her jeans, finds a fine line between tender and predatory. His behaviour is somewhere sex-ward of fatherly. The feeling is mutual, but then again, she is only 15.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Iceland's ash cloud of the apocalypse

    • Brian Matthews
    • 19 May 2010
    9 Comments

    If Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano erruption was disruptive, its cousin Katla may have worse in store. Volcanoes, emanating a kind of preternatural, primal, patience, are landlords whose unchanging message is: you are renting; you haven't bought.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Dog poems

    • Various
    • 18 May 2010

    as she lies there, somehow she feels time creeping — some inchoate sense, sense of the Grim Reaper reaping with his scathing scythe, or Father Time with a sieve ...

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Forgiving genocide

    • Bronwyn Lay
    • 14 May 2010
    3 Comments

    During the massacre Rurangwa's grandmother was murdered mid-prayer, various family members called to god for help, while the killers, fellow parishioners of the local church, struck their machetes until faith fell with precious bodies into a pile.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Child abuse fable

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 May 2010
    5 Comments

    The pastor terrifies and humiliates his adolescent son with tall tales about a painful and fatal illness that can be contracted through masturbation. We are led to believe such secret acts of parental abuse lay at the core of the more public crimes that occur in the village.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Losing Ben

    • Chris Mulherin
    • 12 May 2010
    31 Comments

    The oldest of our five, Ben studied science, medicine in his sights, healthy, not wealthy and wise beyond his years. Ben died quietly. He had no choice really, we turned off the machine.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Photographing Paris

    • Ian C. Smith
    • 11 May 2010

    mapping the cobbled Parisian dawn .. in search of juxtaposition .. stairways, upturned street vendors' carts .. unglamorous prostitutes, pedlars .. the stillness of odd, aged architecture .. angles, spaces awash with light

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Sport as class warfare

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 06 May 2010

    Tony is the working class underdog battling to excel in a sport dominated by private school boys. The temptation for the poor westie Tony to engage in petty crime is a cliché too far, but does help to highlight the social structures that define Tony's world.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Rudd and the art of talking in circles

    • Bill Collopy
    • 05 May 2010
    7 Comments

    Kevin Rudd has raised circumlocution to an art since coming to office. But recently his polysyllabic heart rate seems to have slowed. What's changed? Could it be the patter of Tony feet? Time to restart that 'working families' mantra: plain prose beats purple.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    After the Latin

    • Peter Steele
    • 04 May 2010
    1 Comment

    They change the sky but not their soul who run .. across the sea: the impartial earth .. gapes for the child of a pauper as for a princeling ... (For Peter Porter)

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Peter Porter in the capital of the English language

    • Peter Steele
    • 30 April 2010
    1 Comment

    Feed and clothe this Australian poet and lodge him in a library attached to a music venue, and remarkable things would happen. He made of London a country of the mind, its vices, virtues, constant features and mutability there to be inspected and eventually portrayed.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Shane Howard's constancy in hard places

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 30 April 2010
    3 Comments

    Most of these could be described as love songs, even when they focus on the land, on values or on people overwhelmed by misery. Although they tap deeply into the darkness of being human, they are sweet and wistful in the hope that animates them.

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