section: Arts And Culture

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Rudd and the art of talking in circles

    • Bill Collopy
    • 05 May 2010
    7 Comments

    Kevin Rudd has raised circumlocution to an art since coming to office. But recently his polysyllabic heart rate seems to have slowed. What's changed? Could it be the patter of Tony feet? Time to restart that 'working families' mantra: plain prose beats purple.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    After the Latin

    • Peter Steele
    • 04 May 2010
    1 Comment

    They change the sky but not their soul who run .. across the sea: the impartial earth .. gapes for the child of a pauper as for a princeling ... (For Peter Porter)

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Peter Porter in the capital of the English language

    • Peter Steele
    • 30 April 2010
    1 Comment

    Feed and clothe this Australian poet and lodge him in a library attached to a music venue, and remarkable things would happen. He made of London a country of the mind, its vices, virtues, constant features and mutability there to be inspected and eventually portrayed.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Shane Howard's constancy in hard places

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 30 April 2010
    3 Comments

    Most of these could be described as love songs, even when they focus on the land, on values or on people overwhelmed by misery. Although they tap deeply into the darkness of being human, they are sweet and wistful in the hope that animates them.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Music as religion

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 29 April 2010
    3 Comments

    Fingers, impossibly nimble, weave melody amid the dappled tips of sunny seas. Rush it to foamy, gushing peaks. Drop it amid thundering, vigorous rolls. Set it adrift once more, wet, bruised and quietly thrilled. It's the moment when God arrives, whatever it is you understand 'god' to be.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Confession of a football criminal

    • Frank O'Shea
    • 28 April 2010
    7 Comments

    The case was not reported in the local paper, much to our disappointment, so we never had the distinction of being described as 'local youths'. In our pre-teen innocence, we were convinced our parents would appeal, all the way to the High Court if necessary. They had more sense.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In the suburbs of glut

    • Les Wicks
    • 27 April 2010
    1 Comment

    The same delusion that made us rich .. leaves a Hungry by the doors .. By comparison the 'wealthy' ones, Australian with homes .. on the market, no offers .. bereft in Bankstown .. wails in Warrimoo .. People are and want good.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Anzacs underground

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 22 April 2010

    War films tread a fine line if they are to respect the experiences of soldiers without glorifying war. Beneath Hill 60 is the true story of Australian miner-soldiers tasked with tunnelling beneath the front lines during World War I. It is not unkind to the Anzac myths.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Possibility springs in Russian winter

    • Ben Coleridge
    • 22 April 2010
    5 Comments

    Winter in the Russian industrial city of Yaroslavl has been hard since the Global Financial Crisis. The 'contract' between Russia's elite and ordinary Russians, whereby the latter sacrifice their civil and political rights for economic wellbeing, is not delivering.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    When Harry Hogan went to war

    • Brian Matthews
    • 21 April 2010
    14 Comments

    Harry was 18, a knockabout bush larrikin ready to give anything a try. He joined the Second Machine Gun Battalion on 10 February 1915 and landed at Gallipoli on 16 August. For the next four months he, like so many of his fellow soldiers, had an undistinguished, brutalising time, memories of which would stay with him forever.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Learning how to die

    • Tony London
    • 20 April 2010
    3 Comments

    The old people in the mortuary silence of the doctor’s waiting room, rehearse the look, the patois, become familiar with the creeping symptoms, the medicines of resistance, the gentle small steps on the way.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Black Saturday gibe mars Murray's might

    • Philip Harvey
    • 16 April 2010
    6 Comments

    In one poem Les Murray would reduce the causes of the Black Saturday fires to differences in forest management between 'hippies' and 'rednecks'. Utilising poetry to play the blame game demeans our understanding of the complexity of that disaster.

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