section: Arts And Culture

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    'Jihad' evangelicals on trial

    • Saeed Saeed
    • 03 October 2008

    The Catch the Fire Ministries religious vilification case was used for political means by both Muslims and Christians. Deen's account discusses wider issues such as the global rise of Islamaphobia, John Howard's identity politics and the Cronulla Riots.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Dull Duchess

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 02 October 2008

    Famous for being famous, the Duchess of Devonshire is an independent woman in a man's world. A more substantial script might have evoked the subordinate role of women in Western politics, or slyly spoofed the cult of celebrity.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Terror and the terrier

    • Colleen Schirmer
    • 01 October 2008
    1 Comment

    The black and tan fox terrier bared its teeth and growled. Its milk-swollen underbelly let us know it had a litter nearby. We were at the farmhouse, revisiting the place where it had happened, to strip the events of their power.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Bits of poetry

    • Shane McCauley
    • 30 September 2008
    4 Comments

    I untie one small corner .. of the mosquito-net .. and the whole moon .. enters. Without the magician's .. electric hand .. clay's heart might beat  

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Love bytes and pillow fights

    • Andrena Jamieson
    • 26 September 2008
    2 Comments

    Elias' belief in freedom sees him join Che Guevara in an African campaign, and insurgent movements in Angola and Somalia. He learns that ideological commitments mask simpler human desires for riches, revenge, status and sex.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hook turns on weighty subtext

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 25 September 2008

    The characters provide a microcosm of Australia as a fledgling federation. Most poignant is the place of the film's sole Aboriginal character, a gifted pugilist who is ultimately subservient to the purposes of the white characters.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In praise of Cricketmas

    • Tom Clark
    • 23 September 2008
    1 Comment

    Peter Taylor, selected straight from .. Petersham firsts to bowl his offies .. for the baggy green, taught us how .. the 'Strayan dream can fizz and spit .. through Sydney's fond atmosphere.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Unlikely (big) brothers in arms

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 19 September 2008
    1 Comment

    George Orwell and Evelyn Waugh occupied opposing aesthetic, philosophical and political poles. This conceptually agile book suggests they attained moral — if not spiritual — agreement from fundamentally opposing directions.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Woomf! Plunggg! Protons collide with doomsday fanaticism

    • Brian Matthews
    • 17 September 2008
    1 Comment

    The rumoured potential of the Large Hadron Collider to bring about the disintegration of the universe captured the public imagination. 'Hadron' is a word susceptible to misprinting of a kind that destroys the seriousness of any discussion.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Auctioning Jane Austen's hair

    • P. S. Cottier
    • 16 September 2008

    Do they stroke it with avid fingers, this palm tree lock that once grew from the full head of quietest genius? .. Scalping would be too much, headhunting too tropical .. but buying the hair of a dead woman you can't know .. is quite the thing

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Israeli history's 'definitive' rewrite

    • Philip Mendes
    • 12 September 2008
    34 Comments

    Benny Morris, Israel's best-known revisionist historian, led more and more Israelis and Diaspora Jews in the 1980s to accept the legitimacy of an independent Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Morris has changed his spots.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Film implicates audience in acts of cruelty

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 11 September 2008
    3 Comments

    The previous films of director Michael Haneke depict a media-saturated society disconnected from reality. His latest release is a critique of 'violence as entertainment', and every audience member is implicated.

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up