section: Arts And Culture

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Playwrights finger reality missed by politicians

    • Richard Flynn
    • 09 January 2008

    As Australians wait for a Federal election, Hilary Glow’s book is timely evidence that what is wrong with the world is what politicians would have us believe. Contemporary playwrights are wrestling with the issues seen as crucial to the notion of who we really are as Australians in the twenty-first century. From 17 October 2007.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Wilberforce film points to task of modern abolitionists

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 09 January 2008

    This year marks the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Britain. Social justice organisations around the world are using the film Amazing Grace to put a spotlight on the modern trade in human trafficking. From 25 July 2007.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Two people in a garage

    • Debbie Lustig
    • 13 December 2007
    1 Comment

    I nearly drowned in fulfilment, surfacing like a batfish gaping at scraps. No words only our breathing – two people in a garage. Workbenched, love-bolted.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Good music becomes great business

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 December 2007

    In the world of popular music, the transition from intimate theatre or festival gigs, to stadium rock shows, indicates the move from an authentic emphasis on great music, to 'music as spectacle', or pure commerce. It appears Missy Higgins has reached this point.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Young and full of juice

    • Rochelle Siemienowicz
    • 13 December 2007

    The bright eyes of youth often see clearly the things that are wrong with society. 22-year-old Christopher McCandless donates his life savings to Oxfam and sets off on a two-year journey concluding in the isolated wilds of tooth-and-claw Alaska.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    'Best' essays merit book title's reckless superlative

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 13 December 2007

    The recurrence of the ‘big' issues of politics, religion, and sexuality in Best Australian Essays 2007 is predictable enough. But the essays become more interesting when we see particular trends, such as surveillance and the individual's right to privacy, emerge in each.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Dylan writ vain but vulnerable

    • Rochelle Siemienowicz
    • 12 December 2007

    The most recognisable Bob Dylan in this multi-Dylan film is infuriating. Hollow, vain and abusive. But also vulnerable and pitiable; an angry animal pacing his cage.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Love and politics in that order

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 12 December 2007

    Vinnies founder Frederic Ozanam kept a single-minded focus on the faces of the poor in 19th century France, while at the same time playing the role that churches and church organisations need to play in political life.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Nationals need Warren Truss to live up to his name

    • Brian Matthews
    • 12 December 2007
    2 Comments

    Revealing his poetic side when the ship was turned away from Kuwait, Truss explained to Parliament that the sheep were beginning 'their long, lonely journey down the gulf'. As the responsible minister, he later repressed his lyricism and reverted to political jargon.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The dialect of dream

    • Shane McCauley
    • 12 December 2007

    Enough will be there if you can learn the language of fragments.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The Romantic poets and climate change

    • Brian Matthews
    • 14 November 2007

    A person unaware of and cut off from nature will be taken by surprise when nature embarks on one of its punitive cycles. The Romantic poets reckoned that there was a spirit within the natural world that you could connect with.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Quality observation in no-frills suburban drama

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 14 November 2007
    1 Comment

    Boxing Day is a low-budget Australian film that combines different techniques to achieve a simmering fly-on-the-wall documentary-style drama. It seeks hope and forgiveness against a low-income suburban landscape, in a way that contributes to the broader story of reconciliation.

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