section: Arts And Culture

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Quality observation in no-frills suburban drama

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 14 November 2007
    1 Comment

    Boxing Day is a low-budget Australian film that combines different techniques to achieve a simmering fly-on-the-wall documentary-style drama. It seeks hope and forgiveness against a low-income suburban landscape, in a way that contributes to the broader story of reconciliation.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Heave heavy individualism

    • Daniel J. P.
    • 14 November 2007

    Well-appointed prospects but ill-advised devices | And improper solutions prompting mixed sugar and spices.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Silence has the last word

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 14 November 2007

    The energy of Alex Miller's novel Landscape of Farewell comes from the paradox that is often manifest when people of very different cultures come together and words fail them. Out of their silence can come words more profound than the individuals could have spoken alone.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Buying and selling creativity

    • Malcolm King
    • 14 November 2007

    It's time we called big businesses' bluff about their appropriation of the term 'creativity'. For a truly creative nation to evolve, we need to study the wild mutability of the creative process.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The Chaser's Just War on celebrity worship

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 31 October 2007
    11 Comments

    The Chaser's 'Eulogy' was less about the celebrities whose deaths it celebrated, than it was about public perceptions of those celebrities. The desire to puncture the 'cult of celebrity' is a major plank in the Chaser's War.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In search of sanctuary

    • various
    • 31 October 2007

    Their lives are anchored at the verge of loss, | Like a flipped coin assurance is unlikely.| Refugees endure a prolonged journey of conflict

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Biopic avoids venerating troubled artist antihero

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 31 October 2007
    6 Comments

    The 'troubled artist', creative but self-destructive, looms large in pop culture. The film Control offers sympathy for the artist's love ones, who are left bruised and bleeding.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    What Richard Dawkins believes

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 31 October 2007
    1 Comment

    For Richard Dawkins, excitement about the visible world leads only to analytical questions. The task of those who oppose this view is to describe the richness of the alternative.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Bob Collins, larger than life Labor minister

    • Frank Brennan
    • 25 October 2007
    6 Comments

    We come to bid farewell to Robert Lindsay Collins, the proud Territorian, the larger than life Leader of the Opposition and Labor Minister, the loving father of Robbie, Libby and Daniel, the faithful spouse of Rosemary, and raucous friend of many of us gathered here today in St Mary's Cathedral Darwin.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Nothing new in cynicism towards politicians

    • Brian Matthews
    • 17 October 2007
    1 Comment

    When reconciliation becomes a last-minute vote catcher, only the deepest, most corrosive cynicism is possible. Trampling on the rights of others for political advantage was the modus operandi of Adelaide's Nomenclature Committee in 1837.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Death and birth set cerebral thriller in motion

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 17 October 2007

    Despite dwelling at opposite ends of the power spectrum, the two characters each know the desire to seek a new life in a new land, and have both experienced first-hand how difficult and painful that transition can be.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Playwrights finger reality missed by politicians

    • Richard Flynn
    • 17 October 2007

    As Australians wait for a Federal election, Hilary Glow’s book is timely evidence that what is wrong with the world is what politicians would have us believe. Contemporary playwrights are wrestling with the issues seen as crucial to the notion of who we really are as Australians in the twenty-first century.

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