section: Arts And Culture

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In search of Henry Lawson's mother's birthplace

    • Brian Matthews
    • 27 June 2007
    3 Comments

    A literary pilgrimage to rural lands near Wellington, NSW, while writing a book about Louisa Lawson. You never arrive: there is no pub, no post office, no CWA; no change in the benign parquetry of land ploughed, harvested, under crop, straggling with native scrub.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Knowing where the bodies are buried

    • Tony Smith
    • 27 June 2007

    But for its indubitable basis in reality, Shane Maloney's political thriller Sucked In would be fine therapy for those jaded Australians hoping to see an election year eruption of idealism in the affairs of state.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Grave notes

    • James Waller
    • 13 June 2007

    A selection of 31 one-line poems.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Inconvenient truths and crude awakenings

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 June 2007
    1 Comment

    A shocking new documentary with compelling economic and cultural arguments that add weight to the warning environmentalists have been issuing for years. When the oil runs out—and it has to, eventually—it will drastically, permanently change our world.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A short note on secrets

    • Brian Doyle
    • 13 June 2007
    5 Comments

    Women and secrets led me to murky confusion where I have lived ever since. The first girl I ever kissed swore me to secrecy, but we were fourteen years old then and I didn’t actually have anyone to tell the secret to, since my brothers and friends would have fallen down laughing at the very idea that a girl had kissed me.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Grubby oil grab that left a tiny country gasping

    • Christine Kearney
    • 13 June 2007
    1 Comment

    Ugly. Rapacious. Bruising and governed by the narrowest definitions of national interest. These are a few of the descriptions that spring to mind after reading this devastating portrait of Australia’s negotiations over oil and gas resources in the Timor Sea.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Greenhouse mafia's scorching approach to climate change

    • John Button
    • 13 June 2007
    11 Comments

    No wonder people hope for arguments which suggest climate change will go away. The discussion about climate change has become increasingly feverish, polemical and downright dishonest.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In the Dreams of Whales & The Muses

    • Grant Fraser, L.K.Holt
    • 13 June 2007
    2 Comments

    In the dreams of whales we are the sons of Ishmael, / Fleet of limb, / Sheened with droplets of water, droplets of air, / Crammed with kindnesses.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Aloofness the price for master critic's knowledge and incisiveness

    • Clive O'Connell
    • 13 June 2007

    2003 Nobel Literature prizewinner and Adelaide research fellow J.M. Coetzee, offers even-handed judgements about arcane authors. He assesses their work with an understanding assurance that abstains from proclaiming genius where there is only fitful talent.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Redemptive Romulus a film for the ages

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 June 2007

    Romulus, My Father should be remembered as one of the great Australian films of 2007. It should also be the film that cements Eric Bana’s place as a serious actor of considerable ability.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Deeply buried emotions of the Stolen Generations

    • Brian McCoy
    • 18 May 2007
    5 Comments

    This month marks the tenth anniversary of the Bringing Them Home report. A new book celebrates the efforts of the late Aboriginal activist and leader Rob Riley to redress a litany of wrongs and injustices towards his people.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A brief history of the car bomb

    • Gary Pearce
    • 18 May 2007

    A new book shows how the history of a technology can be used for exploring some of the key forces and events of an age. The future could have us all living in red zones, and subject to surveillance, police checks and suspended civil liberties.

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up