section: Arts And Culture

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Riding out the Romantic Storm

    • Philip Harvey
    • 20 April 2006

    Philip Harvey reviews Ann McCulloch’s Dance of  the Nomad:  A Study of the Selected Notebooks of A.  D. Hope.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    On down the line

    • Michele Gierck
    • 20 April 2006

    Michele  M. Gierck reviews Arch and Martin Flanagan’s The  Line:  A  Man’s  Experience  of  the  Burma Railway;  A Son’s  Quest  to  Understand.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A disaster waiting to happen

    • Denis Tracey
    • 20 April 2006

    Denis Tracey on Ronald Wright’s  A Short  History  of  Progress.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Quick reviews

    • Brooke Davis, Merrin Hughes, Kate Chester, Cassy Polimeni
    • 20 April 2006

    Reviews of the books The  Penelopiad;  Saving  Fish  from  Drowning;  No  Place  Like  Home;  and Breastwork:  Rethinking  Breastfeeding.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Film reviews

    • Allan James Thomas, Gil Maclean
    • 20 April 2006

    Reviews of the films Brokeback  Mountain, Jarhead and Munich.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Going to jail

    • Brian Doyle
    • 20 April 2006

    Brian  Doyle on incarceration, American style.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In the eye of the protagonist

    • Tim Kroenert

    The common metaphor to describe feeling empathy is to 'put yourself in someone else's shoes'. In the biopic The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, director Julian Schnabel goes further and places his audience inside his protagonist's eye.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Pulped promises and draining tidal waters

    • Gillian Telford
    2 Comments

    the wood-chip mills with gaping jaws strip chew and spit out forests ... protestors gather in city parks to march with banners — promises are processed — pulped

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The material stretched by the spiritual

    • Peter Steele
    1 Comment

    The Spirit of Secular Art, for all its attention to the work of human hands devoted to festivity, often has an eye on human affairs at large. It can function as a challenge to many of the central themes of contemporary political life in Australia.

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