section: Arts And Culture

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The earth we are made of

    • Lucy Alexander
    • 23 March 2020

    The floodplain is full of the black earth we are made of. All of the world’s particles pass through this zone: yours, too. Have them arranged so your heart can weigh in. Have them in order, crystallised and formatted. The light frothing up will hold your new name.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Language and prejudice

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 22 March 2020
    15 Comments

    I have been bemused to read the result of a recent poll taken in Britain. It suggests that 26 per cent of people feel ‘uncomfortable’ when hearing foreign languages spoken. Me, I feel envious, simply wishing that I was more of a linguist.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Home is where the work is

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 19 March 2020
    4 Comments

    Overnight, my workplace has doubled in size. This once quiet space, filled with just the click-clacking of a keyboard and the occasional waft of classical music, now rumbles with the sound of my husband’s voice. He goes from one call to the next, discussing spreadsheets and renewals, holding conference calls and informal chats and performance reviews.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Stateless and the inhumanity of detention

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 18 March 2020
    12 Comments

    I've been watching Stateless, the ABC drama about Australia’s immigration detention system, with some reluctance. Not because it is poor, but because it is so powerful. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The treachery of sand

    • Les Wicks
    • 16 March 2020

    Anchored in the treachery of sand, wearing waves until the snip of a certain comber shreds them landward. They call this weed. There are people here too busy in their pleasure. They stare further out across the stolid hungers of tankers queued to feed national necessity, rapacity.  

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Resilience and trust, in crisis

    • Deborah Singerman
    • 15 March 2020
    2 Comments

    I still mainly look back. The bushfire legacy lives on. It acts as a benchmark for assessing tragedy and hope. I cannot get the searing images out of my head of red, angry skies, of flames raging frighteningly, embers flying, and firefighters miraculously persevering against the odds.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Heart sparks

    • Diane Fahey
    • 09 March 2020
    3 Comments

    I remember, in the small hours, a spill of arcane patterns on the glass — heart-sparks treasuries of hallowed grief, of yet-to-be-lived hope, sequestered in the infinite.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Managing mental health is an ongoing job

    • Katherine Richardson
    • 09 March 2020
    5 Comments

    I have always been a very black or white person, and it’s taken me a long time to allow myself to see the shades of grey that so often permeate our lives. Thinking of managing my mental health all the time felt like such a foreign concept to me at first.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The ecology of words

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 04 March 2020
    8 Comments

    To speak of the ecology of words can be illuminating because it evokes the wide range of relationships that words embody. It also invites us to ask broad questions about the healthy and unhealthy use of words in a society.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    That pastoral edge

    • Chris Wallace-Crabbe
    • 02 March 2020
    1 Comment

    From just up here, on the lip of mountain mileage, that pooling river mouth below, half salt but also hill-fresh, could seem a lagoon.  On its low point, surmounting asphalt and breaking waters, sits the verandaed pub, a focus once of holiday shorescape.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Stop bombarding us with military metaphors

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 26 February 2020
    22 Comments

    One of the most popular, and largely counterproductive, metaphors in public conversation is the military one. It suggests that the project commended is a war in which there is an enemy, a campaign to be begun, forces to be mobilised, a public whose support is to be won, and weapons to be used. They commit us to do whatever it takes to win the war.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    No stranger now

    • Earl Livings
    • 24 February 2020
    2 Comments

    I circle the huge granite standing stone sunwise three times, as my ancestors did long before the designs of cranes and coins, of theory. ‘Tell me how and what they thought.’ No answer but the wheeling murmuration of a thousand starlings. A stubble field.

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