section: Australia

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • AUSTRALIA

    What Paris did next

    • James Massola
    • 13 June 2007
    7 Comments

    The big news recently has been Paris Hilton, the heiress and celebrity who is famous for being famous. Hilton has been in the news because she was sent to jail for drink driving. One wonders what all this has contributed to the sum of human existence.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    'History wars' propel local yarns into big picture

    • Susan Aykut
    • 13 June 2007

    Organisations that commission the writing of their history know that they must speak to their own people. But they should also engage with big picture debates that put people's stories into a larger context.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    No place for truth in citizenship training school?

    • Erasmus
    • 13 June 2007
    4 Comments

    It’s an ordinary day at the Citizenship Traditional School. Citizenship questions are about Australian values – fair go, mateship, correct use of English, etc. Take the questions home and memorise the right answers.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Rabbit proof fence not Jigalong's only barrier

    • Jack Waterford
    • 13 June 2007
    2 Comments

    Jigalong is a remote community in WA, best known for its association with the Rabbit Proof Fence. Remote Aboriginal communities suffer greatly from undeveloped nature of their economies, and the institutional barriers created to prevent them developing.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Why is it so hard to say sorry?

    • Ursula Stephens
    • 13 June 2007
    16 Comments

    This year's anniversaries are reminders of the importance of "sorry" in the reconciliation process. Why is it so hard to admit that most human of qualities, fallibility? Regret, atonement and forgiveness lie very much at the core of spiritual values.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Justifying civil disobedience

    • Michael Mullins
    • 13 June 2007
    3 Comments

    Rural landowners are planning a day of "civil obedience" on 1 July to assert what they believe is their right to clear native vegetation from their land. How is this different from the civil disobedience of anti-war protestors such as the Pine Gap Four?

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Muddy ovals under threat from climate change

    • Colin Long
    • 13 June 2007
    1 Comment

    Those of us who played school or local footy in our youth remember bitterly cold days, ankle-deep mud and finding it difficult to tell team mates from opposition through the layers of mud caked on jumpers. My twelve year old has already played for more than five years, but has not experienced one of those afternoons.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Election year strategies for bleeding hearts

    • Tony Kevin
    • 05 June 2007
    3 Comments

    It is looking more and more that Labor will win, and that the present unforeseen Coalition government majority in the Senate may be lost too. There are interesting moral questions arising from this analysis for us "bleeding hearts", among whom I am happy to count myself.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Aboriginal dignity rooted in beliefs subverted but subversive

    • Jojo Fung
    • 05 June 2007
    1 Comment

    This paper calls for a retrospective recognition that the Aboriginal dignity does not depend a priori on a referendum of the dominant white society.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Two models for educating our children and ensuring our future

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 05 June 2007
    5 Comments

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Building blocks for a compassionate society

    • Barry Jones
    • 05 June 2007
    9 Comments

    Tackling the problem of terrorism by the application of force is unlikely to succeed. Pouring blood on the Iraqi desert produced an upsurge of terrorism where none had been before: cruelty, genocide even, but not terrorism, let alone fundamentalist terrorism.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    A comfortable nation afraid to get off the couch

    • Scott Stephens
    • 05 June 2007
    3 Comments

    John Howard’s "relaxed and comfortable" approach to national life, then, was not simply a rejection of Paul Keating’s aggressive, deliberate reforms. It represented a vile pandering to our cultural inertia, an affirmation of our basest tendencies.

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