• Feature Article

    World woe

    1 Comment
    Fiona Katauskas |  View this week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.
  • Feature Article

    Dubious heroes of Wikipedia

    2 Comments
    Philip Harvey |  Swedish physicist Sverker Johansson has reportedly written over 2.7 million articles on Wikipedia since 2001, at an average of 10,000 articles a day. Phil Parker is purported to be the most published author in history, successfully publishing over 85,000 physical books, each of which takes less than an hour to 'write' — 'patented algorithms enable computers to do all the heavy lifting'. But the real work begins after they have finished.
  • Feature Article

    Central American ganglands spark child refugee crisis

    Antonia Castillo |  The exodus of thousands of unaccompanied and undocumented children from Central America countries to the US — via Mexico's unforgiving northern border — has become a humanitarian crisis of unprecedented dimensions. While organised crime continues, economic violence remains unresolved and the US doesn't get its migration policy right, such children will keep risking their lives.
  • Feature Article

    Australia's diplomatic role amid MH17 fallout

    7 Comments
    Tony Kevin |  Initially I was uneasy about Abbott's strong anti-Putin rhetoric. Why was Australia so upfront, so early? I thought he was jumping to conclusions too soon. It is clear now though that his response was based on the same satellite imagery intelligence that John Kerry and Hilary Clinton cite as evidence that it was a Russian missile fired from Russian-supported insurgent territory. He was right, and Bill Shorten is correct to support him.

Central American ganglands spark child refugee crisis

Antonia Castillo | 23 July 2014

A Special Forces officer of the Grupo Reacion Policial guards an alley during a raid against gang members in El Salvador.The exodus of thousands of unaccompanied and undocumented children from Central America countries to the US — via Mexico's unforgiving northern border — has become a humanitarian crisis of unprecedented dimensions. While organised crime continues, economic violence remains unresolved and the US doesn't get its migration policy right, such children will keep risking their lives.

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  • Beware of political posturing after MH17 tragedy

    7 Comments
    Justin Glyn | 22 July 2014

    MH17 wreckageThe horror of the crash that killed 298 people was not a day old before blame was being vigorously assigned by all sides. Not only is this deeply unhelpful and disrespectful, it obscures the fact that, whatever actually happened, a terrible tragedy is at risk of being compounded by the hot-heads on all sides calling for more war and escalation of a conflict in which both Russia and the United States have acted with rank opportunism.

  • Abbott Government blind to social capital

    7 Comments
    Michael Mullins | 21 July 2014

    Human capital imageThe Coalition glorifies business entrepreneurship, which is promoted as a good that trumps social inclusion. It is paradoxical that there is more appetite for social entrepreneurship in the USA, which is known as the land of the self made man. The explanation is that investing in social capital ultimately makes good business sense.

  • Bittersweet victory for the Mothers of Srebrenica

    1 Comment
    Binoy Kampmark | 21 July 2014

    Women hold a banner that reads SrebrenicaLast week the Dutch Supreme Court found that the Netherlands was liable for the deaths of over 300 Bosnian Muslim men and boys at Srebrenica in Bosnia-Hercegovina in July 1995. They had been part of a group of 5000 refugees, who had been sheltering with Dutch UN peacekeepers known as Dutchbat and were handed over to Serb forces in exchange for 14 Dutch peacekeepers. A historical arrangement had been writ in blood.

  • Time to break from Gaza reruns

    10 Comments
    Raff Piccolo | 18 July 2014

    Gaza invasion is 'Likely', The AgeThe latest round of attacks on Gaza is not an isolated incident or bout of violence. It is part of a larger ongoing trend that has persisted for over 60 years. Thus it will come to an end soon, and the Palestinians will begin the process of rebuilding their lives. Like the violence, it is a process to which they have unfortunately grown unaccustomed. To break the cycle Israel must abandon the rhetoric of 'national security' and find a new approach.

  • Abbott and co. working from Orwell's playbook

    20 Comments
    Brian Matthews | 18 July 2014

    Orwell's 1984Life in Orwell's Airstrip One is graceless, demeaning and inhumane for all but those entitled to preferment. Surveillance is increasing, ruling-party secrecy and monopoly on information is rigid, refugees are demonised and language is reduced to sound bites and slogans. The leadership is disjoined from and cynical about the natural world. Just as well it's fiction because it sounds awful doesn't it?

  • The false bottom of the magician's hat

    13 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 17 July 2014

    Magician pulls rabbit out of hatMy response to government reports is often like that of a small boy watching a magician. You know that a rabbit will be produced out of the hat, but you can’t quite work out how it will be done. For a Government set on cutting costs the McClure report into Australia's welfare system will be easy to cherry pick by further depriving the already deprived. The risk is that it will not pull a white rabbit out of the hat, but a ferret.

  • In defence of judges

    18 Comments
    John Ellison Davies | 16 July 2014

    JudgeJudge Garry Neilson is in a spot of bother after comparing incest and paedophilia to homosexuality. He is not the first judge to find himself in this situation and he will not be the last. Judges enjoy a life of privilege and status. In their own courtroom they are feudal masters. But when one of them makes a mistake, the media jumps all over them. Politicians rant. The controversy is always out of proportion to the alleged error. 

  • My father's reign of mathematical precision

    14 Comments
    Nick Gadd | 16 July 2014

    Civil engineerHe was a civil engineer. His professional life was a matter of mathematics and rules. Driving over a bridge, he’d quote the equations that ensured it was safe and stable. There were formulae in his domestic life too. Strict rules about stacking the dishwasher. Knives and forks pointed downwards, to avoid careless stabbings.

  • He taught me how to somersault

    1 Comment
    Susan Fealy | 15 July 2014

    SomersaultShamed me with his arithmetic, built me a balance beam... Let me practise, practise, practise:My body weighted all its edges, open to his eyes, the air, the sun.

  • Thorpe comes out but homophobia is alive and well

    41 Comments
    Peter Maher | 15 July 2014

    Michael Parkinson interviews Ian ThorpeIan Thorpe’s interview with Michael Parkinson on Sunday revealed the self silencing he believed was necessary to protect his integrity, his sporting career, and his relationship with friends, family and fans. It is still a challenge to be open about sexual orientation. Some parents blame their children for ‘insisting in being gay’, and a few priests continue to advise young people coming out to seek medical and psychological help for their ‘problem’.

  • A case of the Ramadan blues

    12 Comments
    Irfan Yusuf | 11 July 2014

    We’re in Ramadan, a time when you’re supposed to be nicer than you normally are. In recent times my mob hasn’t received much niceness from certain quarters. Some of the nasties have been inspired by hysteria related to a proposal to build a mosque in Bendigo. I’m not quite sure what Bendigo’s largely university-based Muslim community did to deserve so much vitriol. 


  • Rules won't restore the Church

    Chris McGillion and Damian Grace | 23 July 2014

    'Reckoning' by Chris McGillionIt is widely assumed that rules are the solution to transgressions such as those being investigated by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. Rules are useful. They can be framed to aid compliance and deter wrongdoing. It is no argument against them to say that people will still offend, but if rules are more legal requirements than the expression of genuine morality, they will have limited effectiveness.

  • Dubious heroes of Wikipedia

    2 Comments
    Philip Harvey | 23 July 2014

    Robots churning out Wikipedia entriesSwedish physicist Sverker Johansson has reportedly written over 2.7 million articles on Wikipedia since 2001, at an average of 10,000 articles a day. Phil Parker is purported to be the most published author in history, successfully publishing over 85,000 physical books, each of which takes less than an hour to 'write' — 'patented algorithms enable computers to do all the heavy lifting'. But the real work begins after they have finished.

  • No longer thumped

    1 Comment
    Isabella Fels | 22 July 2014

    Young people kissFirst kiss was kind of crass. Like a big bite on the bottom. Not bliss. Not my idea of a wish. I could have crossed it off the list ... You only get one life. For some women it's all about being a wife. I stay away from the conventions of life.

  • Clive Palmer's world of surprises

    9 Comments
    Michael Mullins | 14 July 2014

    Clive PalmerClive Palmer is thwarting some of the inequities in the Coalition’s Budget and legislative program. He appears to stand for policy that is confused and inconsistent, and possibly self-interested. But in joining hands with Al Gore he has shown himself capable of forging alliances with business and other entrepreneurs, for the common good of humanity. Fellow mining magnate Twiggy Forrest got together with Pope Francis to promote the abolition of slavery. Perhaps the Pope is on Clive’s list.

  • Film compounds real life drugs tragedy

    1 Comment
    Tim Kroenert | 17 July 2014

    Still from 'All This Mayhem'Ben and Tas Pappas, from Melbourne’s working-class north, take the skating world by storm in the 1990s. This film doesn’t skimp on the drugs-and-sex-addled reality in which they found themselves, fuelled by massive sponsorship dollars and the anarchic skating culture. But this is not the film's greatest tragedy. 


WEEK IN POLITICS



World woe

Fiona Katauskas

In Fiona Katauskas' cartoon 'World woe' the world tells a counsellor 'Lately I just feel so conflicted'

View this week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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