• Feature Article

    What the sharia is all the fuss about?

    1 Comment
    Rachel Woodlock |  Once upon a time, a proud dad in Dandenong could name his son Jihad, with its ancient meaning of 'striving' in the path of God. Now he might choose a different name to avoid future discrimination. 'Shari'a' has come to mean the forced imposition of medieval punishments on cowering populations, while 'halal' is the torture of sheep and cows. These words have been stolen from ordinary Muslims, the vast majority of the world's second largest religion. I blame three groups for this.
  • Feature Article

    Food waste in the age of hunger

    Francine Crimmins |  This week the UN announced that more than 20 million people across four African countries face starvation in the coming months. As the World Food Program struggles to feed the starving, they are also reminding people that where there is great need in the world, there is often great waste. In Australia, the Department of Environment and Energy estimates food waste is costing households $8 billion every year. This is twice what the UN predicts it needs to cease a famine in four nations.
  • Feature Article

    Sports Illustrated's plus-sized push is deeply sexist

    Catherine Marshall |  Women everywhere are celebrating Sports Illustrated's 2017 Swimsuit Edition for including among the innumerable images of slender young models a picture of a voluptuous woman wearing a bikini which doesn't conceal the stretch-marks on her stomach. This is Denise Bidot - a so-called plus-sized model, though probably average-sized in reality. This response is problematic, for it salutes a publication that objectifies women for widening the definition of those it is willing to objectify.
  • Feature Article

    Turnbull's coal pitch is a Trojan Horse for gas

    Greg Foyster |  Australia's most politically contentious rock is back in the limelight after Prime Minister Turnbull spruiked 'clean coal' power stations in early February, and Scott Morrison brought a lump of the stuff to parliament. It was a juvenile act, but an effective one: here we are again, still talking about coal weeks later, when the real energy policy battle is over gas. But that's how it goes - a pitch for a new coal-fired power station in Australia is actually a clever exercise in repositioning gas as a greener fuel.
  • How to survive the crucible of school bullying

    Barry Gittins | 24 February 2017

    Sad school studentSquarely back into the school year, dinner conversations with our kids have included strategies for dealing with bullies. A 2016 survey of 20,000 Australians students found one in four respondents reported being bullied, and bullying 'was more common for year 5 students and year 8' - the grade levels of our boy and girl respectively. I'd love to be the 'parent nonpareil', with the right words and advice, but it's not that simple. The variables of personality and situation mean there is no easy, perfect answer.

  • The power of persuasion in confronting fascism

    Daniel Nicholson | 24 February 2017

    Reclaim Australia protestorsIn the footage of one violence protest, I was shocked to see a handful of my homeless clients, draped in Australian flags, engaged in street battles with anti-racists. These young men had experienced alienation, exploitation and poverty - all the things the Left is supposed to fight against. Long, uncomfortable conversations don't make for good social media content, yet if Australia is to stare down the threat of a rising alt-right it won't be done by yelling at right wing fringe groups across a police barricade.

  • What the sharia is all the fuss about?

    1 Comment
    Rachel Woodlock | 24 February 2017

    Yassmin Abdel-Magied on QandAOnce upon a time, a proud dad in Dandenong could name his son Jihad, with its ancient meaning of 'striving' in the path of God. Now he might choose a different name to avoid future discrimination. 'Shari'a' has come to mean the forced imposition of medieval punishments on cowering populations, while 'halal' is the torture of sheep and cows. These words have been stolen from ordinary Muslims, the vast majority of the world's second largest religion. I blame three groups for this.

  • Food waste in the age of hunger

    Francine Crimmins | 24 February 2017

    Sudanese childThis week the UN announced that more than 20 million people across four African countries face starvation in the coming months. As the World Food Program struggles to feed the starving, they are also reminding people that where there is great need in the world, there is often great waste. In Australia, the Department of Environment and Energy estimates food waste is costing households $8 billion every year. This is twice what the UN predicts it needs to cease a famine in four nations.

  • Sports Illustrated's plus-sized push is deeply sexist

    Catherine Marshall | 24 February 2017

    Denise BidotWomen everywhere are celebrating Sports Illustrated's 2017 Swimsuit Edition for including among the innumerable images of slender young models a picture of a voluptuous woman wearing a bikini which doesn't conceal the stretch-marks on her stomach. This is Denise Bidot - a so-called plus-sized model, though probably average-sized in reality. This response is problematic, for it salutes a publication that objectifies women for widening the definition of those it is willing to objectify.

  • Cultural memory points the way through the Trumpocalypse

    Brigitte Dwyer | 24 February 2017

    The Tetrapylon, one of the most famous monuments in the ancient city of Palmyra, before it was destroyed by Islamic State group militants.To many in the West, we are living in a time of despair, an era of nihilism and meaninglessness, signified by growing violence, environment degradation and, most importantly, political chaos. This combination of events, and the sense of hopelessness that accompanies them, can easily be seen as markers of doom, a sign that the era of Western culture is in terminal decline. But it's also possible to interpret them as indicators of the malaise that marks the very peak of life.

  • Turnbull's coal pitch is a Trojan Horse for gas

    Greg Foyster | 23 February 2017

    Cartoon by Chris JohnstonAustralia's most politically contentious rock is back in the limelight after Prime Minister Turnbull spruiked 'clean coal' power stations in early February, and Scott Morrison brought a lump of the stuff to parliament. It was a juvenile act, but an effective one: here we are again, still talking about coal weeks later, when the real energy policy battle is over gas. But that's how it goes - a pitch for a new coal-fired power station in Australia is actually a clever exercise in repositioning gas as a greener fuel.

  • Faith is torture in Scorsese's Silence

    6 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 22 February 2017

    It is the story of two 17th century Portuguese Jesuits who travel to Japan to locate their former mentor, who is said to have renounced his faith, and to spread Catholicism. They find the local Christian populations have been driven underground, under threat of torture and execution. The lesson they come to learn against this fraught backdrop is that the living out of religious faith and the strengths and limitations of ordinary humanity cannot be considered in isolation from each other.

  • Scorsese misses the depths of the 'Japanese swamp'

    4 Comments
    Jeremy Clarke | 22 February 2017

    Andrew Garfield and Japanese actor in SilenceWe are treated at length to Rodrigues' reflections upon the face of Christ, yet the beautiful inculturated image 'Madonna of the Snows' passes us quickly by. There are haunting local hymns yet the missionaries speak halting Japanese. The local church is served by a respected un-ordained head, who leads his fellow villagers in prayer and good works. The survival of the Japanese Catholic community rested on the feeble, faith-filled shoulders of the local women and men who kept praying even unto death.

  • Clarity beyond clericalism: Bishop Long at the Royal Commission

    28 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 22 February 2017

    Bishop Vincent LongThe most thought provoking testimony given during the Royal Commission's Catholic 'wrap up' was that by Vincent Long, Bishop of Parramatta. It was notable for its directness, honesty and the awareness it displayed of the importance of church culture. Bishop Long grew up in the Vietnamese Catholic Church and was afterwards chosen to lead the Australian Church. In his responses he focused particularly on clericalism and its role in giving license and cover to clerical abuse.

  • Netanyahu visit drives the Palestine wedge deeper

    7 Comments
    Andra Jackson | 22 February 2017

    Benjamin NetanyahuIsraeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's visit to Australia this week is having precisely the opposite impact to what he no doubt intended. Instead of shoring up support for Israel's flagrant disregard for United Nations resolutions condemning its continual annexation of Palestinian land, it is driving a deep wedge into what was previously unflagging bipartisan Australian political party support for Israel. Australia's connection with Palestine actually predates the creation of the state of Israel.


Featured Writers

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "It is not a woman's job to be beautiful or sexy. It is not her responsibility to remove her clothes so as to prove that she is beautiful or sexy."
     read more

     

  • David James

    David James headshot

    "Inequality now tends to be determined by whether or not you belong to the elites within a country, or a well rewarded job type, or have capital to invest."
     read more

     

  • Frank Brennan

    Frank Brennan headshot

    "The Royal Commission has less than a year to run. Once it reports, the Australian Church will need to change radically, or become a despised, diminishing sect."
     read more

     

  • Gillian Bouras

    Gillian Bouras

    "Babies do bring their love with them, but there has to be someone there, ready to receive that love."
     read more

     

  • Justin Glyn

    Justin Glyn

    "This is not the way power in a democracy is exercised ... and things don't appear to be on a good trajectory."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "We can only hope real change will follow this inquiry, backed by genuine commitment at all levels of government."
     read more

     

  • Looking for light amid Royal Commission's Catholic wrap-up

    15 Comments
    Frank Brennan | 06 February 2017

    Listening to the media and our church leaders in recent days, we know that there is plenty of darkness ahead for our Church in the weeks ahead with the Royal Commission's so-called 'Catholic wrap-up'. We're told that the statistics will be terrible and we expect that some of our church leaders will appear, looking stunned and helpless. This morning, I think we need to reflect on these stark realities in the light of the scriptures. And this can be done only by holding the victims clearly in focus.

  • Ten movies that really got to us this year

    3 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 14 December 2016

    Still from AnomalisaAmid the noise of Batman battling Superman, the Avengers turning against each other, and middle aged fanboys whingeing about the Ghostbusters franchise being revitalised with an all-female lead cast, 2016 has actually been a pretty solid year for movies, both in and outside of Hollywood. We haven't had time to see them all (we have a magazine to publish, after all) but nonetheless here is a list of our ten favourite films reviewed in Eureka Street this year.

  • History comes to strife in Stratford-upon-Avon

    3 Comments
    Patrick McCabe | 29 November 2016

    Stratford-upon-AvonSomeone I read in high school, so probably Shakespeare, once said 'The past is a foreign country, they do things differently there.' Well, whoever it was clearly hadn't been to Stratford-upon-Avon (so maybe not Shakespeare then). Here, you truly can visit the past, without a passport. As one peruses the shops, houses, supermarkets and ATMs, one cannot help but speculate as to the links between Shakespeare's works and what must have been the commonplaces of his everyday life.

  • Coffee and birdsong

    17 Comments
    Mary Manning | 09 November 2016

    Woman barista'Pull the levers, scoop the coffee, flatten it, steam fragrant liquid into white cups. My lever-pulling right arm has huge muscles from my coffee ballet. Around me: the buzz of conversations about people's plans for their day. No one knows I am lonely.' Short story by former Eureka Street editorial assistant Mary Manning, who died on Tuesday 8 November 2016.

  • New Jesuit General's feeling for the political periphery

    6 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 07 November 2016

    Fr Adolfo Nicolas SJ with Fr General Arturo Sosa SJOrdinarily I wouldn't dare to say political leaders have anything to learn from Jesuits. But these are the kind of extraordinary times of anxiety and flux that led ancient rulers to consult oracles, read tea leaves and look at the flight of birds. People fret because their future and pockets rise and fall on the tide of of would-be presidents. In the sour slurry of discontent and puzzlement the election of a Venezuelan political scientist as international leader of the Jesuits provides material for broader reflection.


WEEK IN POLITICS



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Fiona Katauskas

Dirty coal comes out clean from the PR machine. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


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