• Feature Article

    Youth are speaking, we're just not listening

    Katie Miller and Caitlin Meyer |  'I'm doing it for my kids.' This is how some supporters of Brexit explained their position before the referendum. Yet 75 per cent of voters aged 18 to 24 voted to Remain. It seems the message from 'the kids' to older voters was 'thanks, but no thanks'. The same can be seen in domestic politics here in Australia. We often hear politicians and voters talk about the effects of a policy on future generations. Yet the issues of concern to young people themselves simply don't get much attention.
  • Feature Article

    Operation Proactive Citizen: Tales of a first-time voter

    2 Comments
    Neve Mahoney |  Honestly, I could talk all day about how growing up with Rudd/Gillard/Rudd followed by Abbott/Turnbull turned a generation away from politics. I could talk even longer about how seeing (mostly) white, (mostly) male politicians is its own form of alienation. But if I'm going to be the possible swing vote, the homogenous 'youth vote', I'm going to make it count. I know that I can't afford to disconnect; if for nothing else, I need to vote for the people who can't.
  • Feature Article

    Beyond Brexit doomsday myths

    David James |  Had Greece decided to exit the EU last year the consequences would have been far greater than Brexit, because Greece uses the euro, whereas Britain has the pound. British interest rates are not set in Brussels, they are set by the Bank of England. And it has an independent fiscal and budgetary system, to the extent that it is possible. The British government has been imposing 'austerity' measures because it subscribes to neoliberal orthodoxy, not because it is being told to do so by Brussels or Germany.
  • Feature Article

    'War on business' rhetoric echoes '07 union bashing

    13 Comments
    Brendan Byrne |  Whether or not the person in the now notorious 'fake tradie' ad is or isn't a 'real' tradie is irrelevant. What is relevant is that it is a primary example of the co-option of the language of class struggle and economic justice that has so thoroughly poisoned economic debate in the industrialised West. Implicit within it is a patronising view of the working class that dismisses them as gullible dupes who can be made to entrench the privilege of the few in return for the paltry crumbs of consumer hedonism.
  • Operation Proactive Citizen: Tales of a first-time voter

    2 Comments
    Neve Mahoney | 29 June 2016

    Young votersHonestly, I could talk all day about how growing up with Rudd/Gillard/Rudd followed by Abbott/Turnbull turned a generation away from politics. I could talk even longer about how seeing (mostly) white, (mostly) male politicians is its own form of alienation. But if I'm going to be the possible swing vote, the homogenous 'youth vote', I'm going to make it count. I know that I can't afford to disconnect; if for nothing else, I need to vote for the people who can't.

  • Youth are speaking, we're just not listening

    Katie Miller and Caitlin Meyer | 29 June 2016

    Former YMCA Victoria Youth Parliament participants'I'm doing it for my kids.' This is how some supporters of Brexit explained their position before the referendum. Yet 75 per cent of voters aged 18 to 24 voted to Remain. It seems the message from 'the kids' to older voters was 'thanks, but no thanks'. The same can be seen in domestic politics here in Australia. We often hear politicians and voters talk about the effects of a policy on future generations. Yet the issues of concern to young people themselves simply don't get much attention.

  • Beyond Brexit doomsday myths

    David James | 28 June 2016

    British poundHad Greece decided to exit the EU last year the consequences would have been far greater than Brexit, because Greece uses the euro, whereas Britain has the pound. British interest rates are not set in Brussels, they are set by the Bank of England. And it has an independent fiscal and budgetary system, to the extent that it is possible. The British government has been imposing 'austerity' measures because it subscribes to neoliberal orthodoxy, not because it is being told to do so by Brussels or Germany.

  • Happy hour reverie

    Dougal Hurley | 28 June 2016

    Beer pintsAmber brethren unified over glazed tables, cracked leather chairs groaning under the burden of another weary apprentice. Here's to the blackened crust on a Parma special and to being pricked by an unofficial entry tithe ... Douse me in the balm of mellifluous chatter. Let me move amorously down through this molten journey until I am left suckling at the dregs in my comfortably reduced environ, tending towards something that approaches what some might call contentedness.

  • 'War on business' rhetoric echoes '07 union bashing

    13 Comments
    Brendan Byrne | 27 June 2016

    Still from the fake tradie adWhether or not the person in the now notorious 'fake tradie' ad is or isn't a 'real' tradie is irrelevant. What is relevant is that it is a primary example of the co-option of the language of class struggle and economic justice that has so thoroughly poisoned economic debate in the industrialised West. Implicit within it is a patronising view of the working class that dismisses them as gullible dupes who can be made to entrench the privilege of the few in return for the paltry crumbs of consumer hedonism.

  • No 'one size fits all' solutions to youth unemployment

    8 Comments
    Julie Edwards | 27 June 2016

    Map of Sydney shows areas of disadvantageBoth major parties offer 'one size fits all' approaches to youth unemployment. This ignores the huge difference in experiences - and employability - between different categories of young person. Not all have completed high school and live at home in a supportive environment. For young people at risk of homelessness, those experiencing mental illness or substance abuse problems, or those who have had contact with the criminal justice system, the initiatives of both parties simply won't be effective.

  • There's nothing fair about Australia's tax on sickness

    6 Comments
    Tim Woodruff | 24 June 2016

    Doctor and patientMy patients who earn $36,000 a year pay $36 for most prescriptions. My patients who earn $360,000 pay the same, and those on $3 billion pay the same. Usually, these prescriptions are for conditions which can't be avoided - it's just bad luck. This government imposed co-payment is a tax on illness. It is not noticed by those on $360,000 but for those struggling on $36,000, it does affect their small disposable incomes. It is a regressive tax, and its effect on patient behaviour is well documented.

  • I'm not falling for Turnbull's diabetes bribe

    5 Comments
    Catherine Marshall | 24 June 2016

    Insulin injectionFacing his first election as leader of the Coalition, Turnbull announced that, if reelected, his party would spend $54 million on continuous glucose monitors for up to 4000 Type 1 diabetics under the age of 21. This impressive promise was a lightning rod to the children and small number of adults diagnosed each year with Type 1 diabetes. But it comes too late for Donna Meads-Barlow, who has campaigned tirelessly for government funding for CGMs, and upon whose efforts the government has finally taken action.

  • Feminist parable's message for Eddie McGuire and co.

    7 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 23 June 2016

    That McGuire, eventually, and presumably under pressure from the club's board and a major sponsor, offered what seemed to be a sincere apology, barely diminishes the fact that the comments were made in the first place, compensates for the lack of real repercussions, or excuses the time and effort that was required to get the incident on the agenda at all. Like a good parable, Mustang illuminates the ethical deficit of such a scenario, where women can so readily be bulldozed by powerful male voices.

  • Leave Europe arguments betray cultural amnesia

    16 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 23 June 2016

    Union Jack and EU flag divided by crackSome commentators in the Australian media have welcomed the prospect of Britain's leaving the EU. The founders of the union would recognise these commentators' hoped-for changes. They are precisely the conditions that contributed to the wars that they so feared: the xenophobia, disregard for human rights, chauvinism, military adventures entered by individual nations and competitive economic policies that alienated citizens and so bred authoritarian and ideologically inspired leaders.

  • What if the PM went to Manus Island?

    12 Comments
    Samuel Dariol | 23 June 2016

    Turnbull on QandAIt is one thing to sit at a desk and make policies that will impact on individuals across the sea whom you do not know. It is another thing to cross the sea, to look into the eyes of people abandoned there, to meet the children and see the pictures they have drawn, and to see in their eyes terror, despair, depression and contempt. For a prime minister to go to Manus Island would require him to throw off the shroud and stare affrighted at the maggots in the flesh of the body politic.


Featured Writers

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "Turnbull can put the lollies back in his goody bag. Much as I love my son, I won't be selling my soul at the ballot box."
     read more

     

  • David James

    David James headshot

    "Calls for the EU to 'reform' are almost certainly fanciful. It is run for the banks and powerful corporations."
     read more

     

  • Ellena Savage

    Ellena Savage headshot

    "The corporation doesn't choose between petty modes of individual consumption. It drives the insistence that endless earning & endless purchasing is necessary."
     read more

     

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "In the harsh aftermath of Orlando, it is clear that love does not always win despite what rainbow-flagged advocates might say."
     read more

     

  • Justin Glyn

    Justin Glyn

    "Healthy democracies do not stay that way unless they are properly maintained. At some point it is everyone's responsibility to sniff the rot."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "Holding human remains of colonised peoples, and their cultural belongings, as exhibits, whether scientific or cultural, is deeply offensive."
     read more

     

  • 'Australian Muslim' is not an oxymoron

    16 Comments
    Somayra Ismailjee | 15 June 2015

    Australian Muslim girlsThere is a particular anatomy to the process of othering. In any context, the formula consists of propaganda, hatred, division, suppression and control. I'm from Perth. Some people would dispute this due to my brown skin and non-Anglo name. But I was born here, and have lived here for my entire life. Still, people like me are too often considered Australian only by law, and not by sociocultural connotation.

  • War-room of a child's mind

    4 Comments
    Belinda Rule | 21 June 2016

    child's hand holding mother'sI saw a younger girl, blonde hair in pink clips, spiral glitter sneaker laces - baubles of a treasured child that no-one ever bought for me. A girl in a parlour painting, and I the hairy spider hulking in the corner. In the war-room of the mind, I pierced my map with pins. How simple to trick her to some dirty culvert, hold her down, mar her white arms ... Civilisation was a hair draped on the head of a pin, each one of us poised, rigid, clutching our own pin still - I could see I would cramp with the effort all my life.

  • The bleak ballad of Wilson Parking

    11 Comments
    Ellena Savage | 10 June 2016

    Parking garageWhen my friend and I get to the payment station of the car park, it says we owe 70 bucks, which can't be right because we got the early bird special which was a quarter of that, so, nah. We call the parking lot people and they say look at the fine print, it clearly states that the early bird deal only applies if you leave the car park after 3pm. Wilson Parking is a subsidiary of a subcontractor of Transfield Services, which runs security at Nauru and Manus Island. I grow petulant and say I'll wait til 3pm.

  • Losing and finding Dad in dementia

    13 Comments
    Julie Guirgis | 16 June 2016

    Elderly man, head down in shadowsToday I walked past the bathroom and noticed a pale yellow puddle with an odour worse than an unflushed toilet. I cringed at the stench, with the realisation that I had to wash urine off the floor ... Dad's illness sometimes causes ambiguous loss. It is unclear, has no resolution or closure. He is like someone I don't know anymore; he is gone-but-still-there. This leads to complicated grief. I can't look at him without seeing a fading picture of who he used to be, and speak of him in the past tense.

  • One child held my left pinky

    11 Comments
    Brian Doyle | 06 June 2016

    child holding pinkyOne child held onto my left pinky everywhere we went. Never any other finger and never the right pinky but only the left pinky and never my whole hand. To this day sometimes in the morning I stare at my left pinky and suddenly I am in the playground or on the beach or in a thrumming crowd, and there is a person weighing 40 pounds holding onto my left pinky so tightly I am tacking slightly to port. My finger misses her hand this morning. It has been many years since she held my finger.


WEEK IN POLITICS



Armchair hypocrisy

Fiona Katauskas

A man and woman are bored by news about asylum seeker abuse but appalled by live export scandal. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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