• Feature Article

    The last Anzac's bullshit detector

    4 Comments
    Michael Mullins |  We can judge the exuberance of the Anzac commemoration against the nonchalance of the last Anzac Alec Campbell. He said he went to Gallipoli for adventure and, to him, 'Gallipoli is Gallipoli'. John Howard argued Anzac defined our 'sense of self', although he did acknowledge that Anzac is something that was made up. It's better to let historians rather than politicians select events that define the nation, even if they opt for the frontier wars of the 19th century that depict white Australians as violent and racist rather than heroic and virtuous.
  • Feature Article

    Anzac Day a jarring experience for migrant Australians

    7 Comments
    Fatima Measham |  Since John Howard promoted the memory of 25 April 2015 in the years after 9/11, it has become entrenched in the public imagination as the definitive Australian moment. I look upon it from a distance, in awe, and as the deification of the white male soldier continues apace, with a deeper sense of alienation. As a non-white Australian who migrated to this country from the Philippines, I did try to make it relevant for myself for a while.
  • Feature Article

    The root cause of IS extremism

    14 Comments
    James Fry |  I was 14 years old and angry. My mind was fertile ground for an extremist ideology, like today's IS recruits. One day I met 30 year old Mal, whose chosen brand of neo-Nazi whackery presented a simplistic view of the world. Through my own experience, and my ongoing work with troubled youth, I shudder when I hear politicians talk of their commitment to national security yet at the same time defund community programs working with marginalised young people.
  • Feature Article

    Hope I die before I get (really) old

    12 Comments
    Brigitte Dwyer |  Economists and politicians see productivity as our only hope for the future. We continually assess the productivity of people we meet, with the default question 'What do you do?' The worth of a person can be tied to their productivity, particularly that of older people. Those who advocate legal euthanasia can find it hard to accept that an unproductive life might be worth living.
  • Feature Article

    Abuse victim's post traumatic horror

    Tim Kroenert |  The manner in which Hugh drugs and binds Jay has strong overtones of 'date rape'. More than this, though, there is inherent violence in his having had sex with her at all, knowing that her consent hinged on her ignorance of the real consequences. Now, to be fair, there are men in the film who suffer, too. But the objectification of women by the male gaze and the predatory dynamic this entails is too pervasive to ignore.
  • Feature Article

    The burning of a tainted church

    62 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton |  The burning of a church offers possibilities. It would be a bold and noble gesture, exactly measured to the destruction done to the Catholic Church by priests' sexual abuse, to leave the ruined walls of St James as a shrine to the victims, a record of the evil that was done, and a pledge that never again will children be unprotected in the Catholic Church.

Anzac Day a jarring experience for migrant Australians

Fatima Measham | 20 April 2015

Anzac imagerySince John Howard promoted the memory of 25 April 2015 in the years after 9/11, it has become entrenched in the public imagination as the definitive Australian moment. I look upon it from a distance, in awe, and as the deification of the white male soldier continues apace, with a deeper sense of alienation. As a non-white Australian who migrated to this country from the Philippines, I did try to make it relevant for myself for a while.

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  • The last Anzac's bullshit detector

    4 Comments
    Michael Mullins | 20 April 2015

    Alec CampbellWe can judge the exuberance of the Anzac commemoration against the nonchalance of the last Anzac Alec Campbell. He said he went to Gallipoli for adventure and, to him, 'Gallipoli is Gallipoli'. John Howard argued Anzac defined our 'sense of self', although he did acknowledge that Anzac is something that was made up. It's better to let historians rather than politicians select events that define the nation, even if they opt for the frontier wars of the 19th century that depict white Australians as violent and racist rather than heroic and virtuous.

  • Hope I die before I get (really) old

    12 Comments
    Brigitte Dwyer | 17 April 2015

    Elderly womanEconomists and politicians see productivity as our only hope for the future. We continually assess the productivity of people we meet, with the default question 'What do you do?' The worth of a person can be tied to their productivity, particularly that of older people. Those who advocate legal euthanasia can find it hard to accept that an unproductive life might be worth living.

  • The root cause of IS extremism

    14 Comments
    James Fry | 17 April 2015

    James Fry memoir coverI was 14 years old and angry. My mind was fertile ground for an extremist ideology, like today's IS recruits. One day I met 30 year old Mal, whose chosen brand of neo-Nazi whackery presented a simplistic view of the world. Through my own experience, and my ongoing work with troubled youth, I shudder when I hear politicians talk of their commitment to national security yet at the same time defund community programs working with marginalised young people.

  • The burning of a tainted church

    62 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 16 April 2015

    Fire at St James' GardenvaleThe burning of a church offers possibilities. It would be a bold and noble gesture, exactly measured to the destruction done to the Catholic Church by priests' sexual abuse, to leave the ruined walls of St James as a shrine to the victims, a record of the evil that was done, and a pledge that never again will children be unprotected in the Catholic Church.

  • Abuse victim's post traumatic horror

    Tim Kroenert | 16 April 2015

    Maika Monroe and Lile Sepe in It FollowsThe manner in which Hugh drugs and binds Jay has strong overtones of 'date rape'. More than this, though, there is inherent violence in his having had sex with her at all, knowing that her consent hinged on her ignorance of the real consequences. Now, to be fair, there are men in the film who suffer, too. But the objectification of women by the male gaze and the predatory dynamic this entails is too pervasive to ignore.

  • Neoliberal versus Christian notions of the public good

    3 Comments
    Peter Kirkwood | 15 April 2015

    Last week corporate heavyweights including Google, Apple and Microsoft were grilled about the practice of moving profits from Australia to lower tax jurisdictions. Rev Elenie Poulos, director of UnitingJustice, speaks about the public interest and social good as defined by neo-liberals, and how this is opposed to the Christian notion of the common good.

  • Diplomatic lessons for Julie Bishop in Tehran

    9 Comments
    Justin Glyn | 15 April 2015

    Julie BishopThere are few things less palatable – or likely to persuade others to see your point of view – than public humiliation. This week, as Julie Bishop visits Tehran, there are already some signs that these lessons may not have been well learned. If Australia really wants to make a positive difference in the Middle East, it would be better to listen carefully to the many voices than try to push its tired and cruel demands for the boats to stop and for the world to be remade in its own image.

  • As a watched kettle we were boiling

    9 Comments
    Gayelene Carbis | 14 April 2015

    Boiling kettleWe spent a whole childhood outside houses fighting in our father’s car while women served our father (such a nice man) coffee and cake. We wanted our lives to take off, like a train with a clear destination.

  • 'Single person household' slight on working poor

    5 Comments
    Brian Lawrence | 14 April 2015

    Family with financial worriesA fair minimum wage has to be fair to workers with family responsibilities, many of whom are currently working poor and living in poverty. But in its 2014 Annual Wage Review decision, the Fair Work Commission  decided that the 'appropriate reference household for the purposes of setting minimum wages is the single person household'. This was the first time in more than a century of minimum wage setting that an industrial tribunal has decided that minimum wages should exclude the needs of the low paid with families.

  • Non-judgmental remembrance of two gay men and their love for each other

    23 Comments
    Garry Eastman | 09 April 2015

    iconI looked down at the two coffins resting at the edge of the sanctuary and shed a tear for the tragic loss of two great friends. I shed another tear also to see such public recognition of the love these two young men had for each other, to see that it was embraced by the public face of the Church which said clearly, 'Who are we to judge, they are our brothers.'

  • The questionable good that our public policy serves

    4 Comments
    Elenie Poulos | 02 April 2015

    iconHumans have always pursued wealth and the power it affords, but only relatively recently has the world itself become organised around the service of that wealth. The systems and structures which define the way our world works are financial, geared to the making of profit. They are global and buoyed by governments whose domestic and foreign policies ensure their support. ‘Social good’ and the ‘common good’ are assumed to be economic neoliberalism, and what’s in the ‘public interest’ is whatever advances the neoliberal economic agenda.

     


  • Pope Francis' public shaming strategy

    10 Comments
    Michael Mullins | 13 April 2015

    Pope FrancisFrancis is always ready to criticise unbridled capitalism, but he makes a point of not shaming particular tax dodgers or profiteers. Targeting individuals has become a thing in the age of social media, but those who are left alone are more likely to come forward and join the public conversation. Warren Buffett, one of the world's richest persons, did this when he declared that he paid less tax than his employees, and that he and his wealthy friends have been 'coddled long enough by a billionaire-friendly Congress'.

  • Domestic violence a product of our adversarial culture

    11 Comments
    Michael Breen | 13 April 2015

    There is violence in many aspects of our life and culture, including sport and politics. Parliamentary behaviour very publicly involves viciously attacking the person rather than the issue at hand. We cry out for strong leadership, but this often means tough, fearless, dominating behaviour. The psychopath's polish, charm, and cool decisiveness are easily mistaken for leadership qualities.

  • This boy's life on the autism spectrum

    2 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 09 April 2015

    Asa Butterfield in X+YNathan was diagnosed when he was young, and was encouraged by his parents to view the diagnosis as a gift rather than a curse. It manifests in part as a prodigious talent for mathematics. Nathan finds patterns soothing, and so mathematics becomes a refuge as much as an academic interest. He shares a close bond with his father, but his mother, despite her best efforts, struggles to connect in the same way.

  • Can speech be free in the Catholic Church?

    30 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 09 April 2015

    Karl RahnerRecently priests in England drafted a letter about this year's Synod on the Family. They invited other priests to sign it and made it public. In turn, Cardinal Vincent Nichols rebuked them even though Pope Francis has insisted participants in the Synod are free to express opinions. Free speech has long been tendentious topic for discussion in the Church. 60 year ago German theologian Karl Rahner was daring in the approach he took in his pamphlet Free Speech in the Church.

  • Faceless celebrity maintains ownership of her body

    7 Comments
    Megan Graham | 10 April 2015

    SiaGenerally it's regarded as incomprehensible if, as a woman, you don't bolster and promote your looks to enhance your success. What happens when a female artist releases music without selling her beauty as part of the package? Thanks to Australian singer-songwriter and director Sia, we are learning that beauty need not be what makes or breaks your success.


WEEK IN POLITICS



The body politic

Fiona Katauskas

Fiona Katauskas' cartoon Body Politic compares the bodies of the two leaders Tony Abbott and Bill Shorten

View this week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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