• Feature Article

    Teaching boys to respect girls

    Peter Hosking |  Young people flirt and explore sexuality but this should always involve trust, respect and consent. Right relationships rely on trust, and the more sensitive something is then the greater the responsibility we have to protect people's dignity. It is concerning that some young men presume to exercise power so callously. In objectifying others and treating sex as a commodity, they betray the fundamental aspects of good relationships. Young women are not sexual commodities and young men are not entitled to request and circulate these kinds of intimate images.
  • Feature Article

    SA power play backfires

    6 Comments
    Greg Foyster |  On 7 July, South Australia experienced a cold snap. As residents turned on their heaters, the still and cloudy conditions meant wind and solar power couldn't contribute much to meeting electricity demand. The last coal plant had closed a few months before, pushed out of the market by renewable energy. As if on cue, the spot electricity price spiked. Instead of a lesson about the danger of too much wind power, it's about the danger of too much market power in the hands of a few big players.
  • Feature Article

    Antiheroes of the Bush-Cheney arms boom

    Tim Kroenert |  War Dogs is the latest in a string of films from the past few years that are custom made for our cynical times; deeply ironic black comedies and dramas featuring antiheroes who profit to the point of excess off the misery of others. Where those films dealt with the finance industry and gained relevance from the backdrop of the Global Financial Crisis, this one shifts focus to the grimier world of arms dealing, in the context of Bush era conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • Feature Article

    Luckily for Australia, winning really isn't everything

    8 Comments
    Michael McVeigh |  Australia appears likely to fall well short of its pre-games medal target. This has led to criticism of the government's funding strategy, which has seen money poured into elite sports where Australia has traditionally been most successful or where medals seemed most likely. This approach inevitably leads people to calculate whether Australia has received 'value for money' for its investments. But it doesn't have much to do with what people actually get out of watching or being part of the Olympics.
  • The case for pill testing at music festivals

    Susie Garrard | 29 August 2016

    Music festival crowdAs tickets go on sale for this year's round of music festivals - Falls, Defqon, Bluefest, Lost Paradise, to name a few - organisers still have no means to counteract unsafe drug use. Recent years have seen an increase in drug related injuries and fatalities at festivals. The debate as to how to counteract this worrying trend is ongoing, and tricky to navigate due its subjective nature. Yet when zero tolerance policies clearly haven't worked, it's time to turn to harm minimisation measures.

  • Teaching boys to respect girls

    Peter Hosking | 29 August 2016

    Adolescent boy and girl share headphonesYoung people flirt and explore sexuality but this should always involve trust, respect and consent. Right relationships rely on trust, and the more sensitive something is then the greater the responsibility we have to protect people's dignity. It is concerning that some young men presume to exercise power so callously. In objectifying others and treating sex as a commodity, they betray the fundamental aspects of good relationships. Young women are not sexual commodities and young men are not entitled to request and circulate these kinds of intimate images.

  • SA power play backfires

    6 Comments
    Greg Foyster | 26 August 2016

    Pollution distribution system, cartoon by Greg FoysterOn 7 July, South Australia experienced a cold snap. As residents turned on their heaters, the still and cloudy conditions meant wind and solar power couldn't contribute much to meeting electricity demand. The last coal plant had closed a few months before, pushed out of the market by renewable energy. As if on cue, the spot electricity price spiked. Instead of a lesson about the danger of too much wind power, it's about the danger of too much market power in the hands of a few big players.

  • A society that forgives wins

    11 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 25 August 2016

    Russia's Yuliya Efimova looks on as America's Lilly King celebrates winning the women's 100m breaststrokeAlmost all public conversation quickly turns to transgressors. Olympic competitors growled about proven and suspect drug users. Many wanted people found to have used drugs shamed and shunned. This insistence that transgressors should definitively lose their good name and the right to participate is not confined to sport. If inflexibility and exclusion become the rule in dealing with aberrant speech or behaviour we find unacceptable, they will impose heavy burdens on individuals and society.

  • Antiheroes of the Bush-Cheney arms boom

    Tim Kroenert | 25 August 2016

    War Dogs is the latest in a string of films from the past few years that are custom made for our cynical times; deeply ironic black comedies and dramas featuring antiheroes who profit to the point of excess off the misery of others. Where those films dealt with the finance industry and gained relevance from the backdrop of the Global Financial Crisis, this one shifts focus to the grimier world of arms dealing, in the context of Bush era conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  • The world we choose to live in

    4 Comments
    Jim McDermott | 24 August 2016

    Stylised Trump portraitMaybe standing there we weren't afraid about the fight that was happening across the street, but the fraying at the edges that it represents, the insecurity that the gospel both of Trump and against Trump seems to be creating in our society. It echoes the insecurity we hear in the Brexit vote, and the treatment of both ethnic British citizens and immigrants that followed. Likewise, the resurrection of Pauline Hanson and her One Nation party. None of it sounds good and where is it all going?

  • Girls are not to blame for their own exploitation

    7 Comments
    Madeleine Hamilton | 24 August 2016

    Stop blaming victims chalk sloganThe response from police and others in authority to recent cases involving the abuse or exploitation of adolescent female sexuality is depressingly reminiscent of attitudes held more than 50 years ago. While it was no defence to argue that the girl had consented, if it could be proven she had had consensual intercourse with other men previously, the offender could be acquitted. Consequently, in carnal knowledge trials, girls were frequently accused of having rich histories of sexual activity.

  • Young George

    3 Comments
    Geoff Page | 23 August 2016

    Young George PellWhat's he doing in my dream, that cardinal from Ballarat? He's in some sort of seventies presbytery or hardwood hall, shirt-sleeved but with collar on and playing ping-pong like a pro, fully-focused, yet relaxed. Forehand, backhand, lob or smash, nothing is beyond his reach. The other player is unseen but plainly worthy of attack. There's just the click of celluloid foreshadowing the rise to Rome. No ball hit that's not hit back.

  • Truth beyond written records of the Wave Hill walk off

    6 Comments
    Moira Rayner | 23 August 2016

    Yijarni: True Stories From GurindjiI had been in WA for exactly a year when the local newspaper reported that a white guy had led about 200 people off Wave Rock station. Coming out of the comfortable myth that my home country of New Zealand was not racist, I was amazed to learn that Australia's Indigenous people were obliged to work without industrial protections. In 1966 it was the British Vesteys Group that had been exploiting Aboriginal people: today it is the State in the guise of 'community development', aka work for the dole.

  • Grandchildren are your children twice over

    5 Comments
    Gillian Bouras | 22 August 2016

    Hands of various agesWhen we were all younger, I wrote about my three sons. In the words of Sir Thomas More, their characteristics strangely tugged at my heart, and like More, I fed them cake, ripe apples and fancy pears. Among other things. But eventually there was a mild rebellion about the writing, in the course of which my eldest threatened to send me a bill. Now I write about my grandchildren, three boys and a girl, who are too young as yet to be so commercially minded.

  • Luckily for Australia, winning really isn't everything

    8 Comments
    Michael McVeigh | 22 August 2016

    Ella NelsonAustralia appears likely to fall well short of its pre-games medal target. This has led to criticism of the government's funding strategy, which has seen money poured into elite sports where Australia has traditionally been most successful or where medals seemed most likely. This approach inevitably leads people to calculate whether Australia has received 'value for money' for its investments. But it doesn't have much to do with what people actually get out of watching or being part of the Olympics.


Featured Writers

  • Andrew Hamilton

    Andrew Hamilton headshot

    "When we exclude people you also exclude the contribution they can make to society."
     read more

     

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "No-one complains, for we all know that it is harder for a poor man to enter an earthly kingdom than for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle."
     read more

     

  • Ellena Savage

    Ellena Savage headshot

    "It was harder to believe that our own tacit faith in the cultural values we lived by produced that suffering, for ourselves, and for others."
     read more

     

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "Allowing Duterte to squander the Philippines' economic and political credibility could thwart the very things that Filipinos want to achieve."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "It is imperative that Australian governments stop the abuse occurring in its name - in our name - and somehow remedy the harms that we have caused."
     read more

     

  • Sex, addicts and religious cults

    4 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 01 November 2012

    Amy Adams, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix faces from The Master movie posterI've never been a member of a cult, but I do have limited fringe experience of one fervent pentecostal church. The Master's portrayal of cult life chimes disturbingly with that experience. The cult members are attracted not just to the promise of meaning and belonging, but also to the eerie comfort of having someone else do their thinking.

  • Liturgy translation prophecy

    24 Comments
    Marlene Marburg | 01 November 2011

    Raw side

    Two blessings, one resurrected, one still in the tomb. We are not pre-Vatican. We think whole, body and soul ... We are not parrots in a pew trembling. 

  • The skeleton dance

    2 Comments
    Margaret Cody | 31 October 2008Dia de los Muertos, Flickr image by Glen's PicsMexico's Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead, is not a gloomy celebration, it is a recognition of death as part of life. Skeletons lean precariously out of every doorway and window, smiling, bejewelled and ready for the party.

  • Tolerance and Islam

    Peter KIrkwood | 01 June 2012

    Reza Shah-Kazemi book coverThe tensions that led to this week's massacre in Syria have their roots in centuries old conflict between Shia and Sunni Muslims. Progressive Shia scholar Reza Shah-Kazemi is esteemed for his vision for tolerance and dialogue with other faiths based on Quranic texts.

  • Coastal communion

    6 Comments
    Gregory Day | 01 June 2011

    White capsIn the tiny church built of ecumenical brick, with barely any aesthetic pleasure to distract from the humility of the message, Patrick and his cohort in both the earlier football match and in the communion to come, sat quietly, though with the telltale legs of novices swinging restlessly under the front pew.


WEEK IN POLITICS



Not-so-free speech

Fiona Katauskas

Andrew Bolt is selective about whose free speech he is defending.  Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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