• Feature Article

    Questions for sub happy Australia

    1 Comment
    Justin Glyn |  If Australia knows who its enemies are, presumably these putative enemies have a fairly good idea who they are as well. How are they likely to respond to a purchase of submarines? By initiating military countermeasures? By exacting trade sanctions? By diplomatic reprisals? These questions are vital, not just for military planners but also for anyone who is likely to be affected by Australian foreign policy as well as those who want to know more generally how their tax dollars are to be spent.
  • Feature Article

    A reply from an advocate to Peter Dutton about self-harm

    2 Comments
    Di Cousens |  I talk to those on Manus at all times of the day and night and make sure they are okay. Of course, they are not okay, but so far all of my friends are still alive We keep their spirits up by sending them clothes, games and keeping their phones paid-for so they can talk to their families. We keep them informed about what is going on in Australia. We do not encourage them to hurt themselves in order to put pressure on the government. We do everything possible to stop them from hurting themselves.
  • Feature Article

    Changed by faith in a miraculous child

    Tim Kroenert |  Despite its epic scope it is also deeply intimate and, dare I say, spiritual. Roy regards his son with a mixture of stern, protective love, and helpless wonder. They are joined in their quest by Roy's childhood friend Lucas, a state trooper converted to Alton's cause after literally seeing the light in his eyes. Also by Alton's mother, Sarah, who of all the cohort has the most direct experience of the 'sense of awe' that ultimately unfolds from the 'mystery' of Alton's story.
  • Feature Article

    Strong women as self-agents in remote communities

    Jasmeet Sahi |  Doreen, a women's leader from the community in Kalumburu, said, 'it is our dream for us women to get up and make the community stronger'. Such determination ought to be facilitated. What this means is making avenues where Indigenous culture and cultural life are at the centre of the conversation to effect change. Instead of adopting a 'helping' attitude, there needs to be a shift towards facilitating self-agency as an economically rational approach when it comes to Indigenous Australians.
  • Questions for sub happy Australia

    1 Comment
    Justin Glyn | 09 May 2016

    Cartoon Australia shaped submarine by Chris JohnstonIf Australia knows who its enemies are, presumably these putative enemies have a fairly good idea who they are as well. How are they likely to respond to a purchase of submarines? By initiating military countermeasures? By exacting trade sanctions? By diplomatic reprisals? These questions are vital, not just for military planners but also for anyone who is likely to be affected by Australian foreign policy as well as those who want to know more generally how their tax dollars are to be spent.

  • A reply from an advocate to Peter Dutton about self-harm

    2 Comments
    Di Cousens | 09 May 2016

    Peter Dutton's face in shadowI talk to those on Manus at all times of the day and night and make sure they are okay. Of course, they are not okay, but so far all of my friends are still alive We keep their spirits up by sending them clothes, games and keeping their phones paid-for so they can talk to their families. We keep them informed about what is going on in Australia. We do not encourage them to hurt themselves in order to put pressure on the government. We do everything possible to stop them from hurting themselves.

  • Strong women as self-agents in remote communities

    Jasmeet Sahi | 06 May 2016

    Clare Wood with members of Kalumburu communityDoreen, a women's leader from the community in Kalumburu, said, 'it is our dream for us women to get up and make the community stronger'. Such determination ought to be facilitated. What this means is making avenues where Indigenous culture and cultural life are at the centre of the conversation to effect change. Instead of adopting a 'helping' attitude, there needs to be a shift towards facilitating self-agency as an economically rational approach when it comes to Indigenous Australians.

  • Election budget fiddling

    1 Comment
    John Warhurst | 06 May 2016

    Australian dollarsIt was a political budget in a special sense, given the forthcoming election. Yet it turned out to be neither an election-winning nor election-losing budget. It was more continuity than change. In that sense it probably was the best the government could hope for given the nation's economic and financial circumstances. However it falls far short of the sort of budget that might have been expected from a prime minister like Malcolm Turnbull whose image is one off a 'big picture man'.

  • Changed by faith in a miraculous child

    Tim Kroenert | 06 May 2016

    Despite its epic scope it is also deeply intimate and, dare I say, spiritual. Roy regards his son with a mixture of stern, protective love, and helpless wonder. They are joined in their quest by Roy's childhood friend Lucas, a state trooper converted to Alton's cause after literally seeing the light in his eyes. Also by Alton's mother, Sarah, who of all the cohort has the most direct experience of the 'sense of awe' that ultimately unfolds from the 'mystery' of Alton's story.

  • Anna Burke: 'It's time for a rational debate about refugees'

    3 Comments
    Di Cousens | 06 May 2016

    Anna Burke'We have now got a world wide refugee problem. We don't have one here but we do have one world wide. It is now time to start having a rational debate about what we do with these people as opposed to playing the race card.' Interview with Anna Burke, who has represented the seat of Chisolm in the House of Representatives for the ALP since 1998. Burke was the first female Speaker of the House (2012–2013), and has been a consistent advocate for asylum seekers. She will retire at the next election.

  • Another Coalition budget for the well-off

    16 Comments
    Marcelle Mogg | 05 May 2016

    One scruffy foot, one neat and polished footEven the International Monetary Fund recognises that the best way to grow an economy is to reduce the divide between rich and poor, ensuring that all people have a chance to participate in the social and economic life of a country. The Coalition government remains resolutely opposed to this growing body of evidence, continuing to rely on economic structures that entrench disadvantage, then blame the poor for their fate. The Budget provides tax cuts to the rich and service cuts to the rest.

  • Being popular is not the same as leadership

    3 Comments
    Fatima Measham | 04 May 2016

    Malcolm TurnbullIn democracies, public sentiment is meant to be taken seriously. Describing something as populist is a refusal to engage with the sentiment, including its source and complications, usually because we find it disagreeable. The subtext is: people are wrong about the things they care about. They are not being rational or realistic. It is a brave thing to say these days about support for a royal commission into banks, or softening public attitudes toward detention-bound children.

  • The divisive life of a pacifist priest

    18 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 04 May 2016

    Daniel BerriganBy many United States Jesuits including military chaplains, Dan Berrigan was seen as a divisive figure. I also found his actions challenging. I was still to move from my concentration on the goals of military action to focus on what happens to people who make war and have it made on them. Berrigan and others helped me to see the dishonesty in the conduct of the Vietnam war, the cost to Vietnamese civilians and to soldiers on both sides, and the corruption of ethical sensitivity in both societies.

  • Dumped-on Elders down but not despairing

    10 Comments
    Michele Madigan | 03 May 2016

    Aboriginal elders oppose dumpAs fifth century BC Athenian historian and general Thucydides said: 'The strong do what they can, and the weak suffer what they must.' 'I'm sitting here trying to eat my weetbix and keep my thoughts calm,' said Enice Marsh, Traditional Owner for the Flinders Ranges area of SA. Enice and the other Adynamathanha Elders had just received the news that former Liberal Senator Grant Chapman's property Bardioota is 'at the top of the list' to be the site of Australia's national radioactive waste dump.

  • Five reasons the LNP's carbon scare campaign is doomed

    4 Comments
    Greg Foyster | 03 May 2016

    Malcolm Turnbull and Greg Hunt throws lumps of coal from a bag held by Tony Abbott at Bill Shorten's solar panelsIt was as if Australian politics had regressed four years overnight. No sooner had Labor released its new climate change plan than the Coalition was resuscitating Tony Abbott's 'carbon tax' line. The Coalition's attempt to revive the defining debate of the 2013 federal election won't work. As other commentators have noted, Labor's plan has been carefully crafted to avoid the carbon tax sledge. More importantly, external factors have changed to make a scare campaign less potent.


Featured Writers

  • Andrew Hamilton

    Andrew Hamilton headshot

    "Berrigan made it his business to expose the ethical corruption that afflicts societies that wage war & the human cost to the people whom war supposedly helps."
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  • David James

    David James headshot

    "It has been a world-wide power grab that has created a new form of serfdom."
     read more

     

  • Ellena Savage

    Ellena Savage headshot

    "Sometimes in neighbourhoods like these it's hard to remember that their popularity has stemmed from the grit of their radical and disadvantaged histories."
     read more

     

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "As it turns out, 'populist' things are nothing more than the expectations of the governed."
     read more

     

  • Frank Brennan

    Frank Brennan headshot

    "Australia should cut its losses now, rather than waiting for a royal commission to lay bare the long term cost of what has been done in our name."
     read more

     

  • Kicking corruption in church and police 'closed systems'

    8 Comments
    Paul Coghlan | 05 May 2016

    Hillsborough Stadium disasterHaving worked in closed organisational systems like Victoria Police and various government departments, I have often reflected on how and at what point organisations and their employees become comfortable with the belief that their ideas and attitudes are better informed than those of the general populous - and that their survival is more important. A very stark example of this are the recent court decisions relating to the Hillsborough Stadium disaster in 1989, where 96 people were killed.

  • Francis in Lesbos confronts the unforgivable sin

    10 Comments
    Gillian Bouras | 19 April 2016

    The Power and the Glory by Graham GreenPope Francis recently visited the island of Lesbos, another scene of immigrants' dire suffering, and surprised the world by taking 12 refugees back to Rome with him. Bernie Sanders asserted that the Pope, in his gesture of hope, is surely the greatest demonstration against a surrender to despair. I am still partly persuaded by Graham Greene's view of despair as being the unforgivable sin, but I'm also giving some thought to the distressing matter of indifference.

  • Singing and subverting White American history

    1 Comment
    Tim Kroenert | 14 April 2016

    Lin-Manuel Miranda in HamiltonThe show's implicit subversiveness runs deep. It is embodied in the fact that its cast consists of mostly Black and Latino performers portraying White characters, using a vernacular and musical styles popularly associated with these cultural groups. It thus stands as a riposte to the history of black/brownface and whitewashing in popular entertainment. Crucially, in a show about 'founding fathers', it is the story's women who not only provide its emotional core but are also the most fundamentally heroic.

  • Homeless Persons Union holds state to account

    2 Comments
    Ellena Savage | 15 April 2016

    Homeless Persons Union houseWhen we talk about the 'housing crisis' we are often referring to the plight of young working people and migrants struggling to tap into a property market that has been made a prestige market. This has been incentivised by tax breaks for investors, and is symptomatic of the culture of hoarding family wealth for the purpose of passing down class privilege. The Bendigo Street occupation reminds us that the 'housing crisis' is one and the same as the homelessness crisis; not a crisis of scarcity, but of policy.

  • Queer experience is not limited to trauma

    24 Comments
    Ellena Savage | 18 March 2016

    Young black queer woman, photo from Safe Schools Story Project 'Coming out' is a gesture specifically, politically required of queer people but not of straight people. Another statement demanded of queer people is that they are injured and traumatised by the fact of their sexuality or gender. But why call on individuals to testify when the statistics are heartbreaking enough? This demand on queers to continually deliver narratives of oppression limits their social roles, and even invalidates their voices on matters other than their sexualities and genders.


WEEK IN POLITICS



Tears for Omid

Fiona Katauskas

Malcolm Turnbull and Peter Dutton walk past graves of Reza Berati, Hamid Khazaei and Omid and say 'We wouldn't want to get misty-eyed'. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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