• Feature Article

    Getting off gas not so easy for renters

    Greg Foyster |  Standard electric heaters turn roughly one unit of electricity into one unit of heat. A reverse cycle air conditioner, however, uses electricity to 'pump' heat from one place to another and is incredibly efficient. Using electricity from the grid creates more pollution than burning gas, but the electric reverse cycle air conditioner is so efficient it's still less damaging overall. That's great news for households with air con, but galling for anyone who can't afford one, or isn't allowed to install it.
  • Feature Article

    Philippines coming full, sordid circle

    2 Comments
    Fatima Measham |  None of what continues to unravel in the Philippines is a shock. In August last year, barely more than a month from inauguration, Duterte mentioned the prospect of martial law in relation to his drug war. Duterte is the sixth president since the 1986 People Power revolution that overthrew Marcos. He is a close associate of the dictator's children. Martial law was long in play before the incidents in Marawi this week, and is in character for an ex-mayor with alleged links to 'death squads'.
  • Feature Article

    Gonski in an age of budget repair

    12 Comments
    Frank Brennan |  The level of consultation prior to the announced changes was appalling. But that is water under the bridge. It's time to enunciate some clear principles, and for respectful consultations to take place investigating how those principles can be best applied. This must be done within the realistic political environment in which we find ourselves. At the same time the Catholic system should ensure its schools are more available to the poor, enacting Pope Francis's desire for 'a Church which is poor and for the poor'.
  • Feature Article

    Still fighting for our rights 50 years after the referendum

    4 Comments
    Dani Larkin |  An interesting aspect was the shift in the mindset and understanding among non-indigenous Australians regarding Aboriginal rights. To note the way in which one dominating western culture moved toward recognising the rights of another culture that was oppressed by it is quite remarkable. We should consider those aspects of the mentality shift (from both cultures and their understanding of what the 1967 referendum meant) if we are ever to revisit that type of federal movement again.
  • Feature Article

    The work of disobedience

    14 Comments
    Susan Leong |  As adults we deal with KPIs every day at work, targets defined apparently for one's benefit so we all know what needs to be achieved if our jobs are to be secured. Sadly, they also determine what, how and where we focus our efforts as these targets are internalised over time. If there is to be a future for work, it is to be found in such disobedience, a rejection of the primacy of paid labour for work as 'pleasure in the exercise of our energies'.
  • Getting off gas not so easy for renters

    Greg Foyster | 26 May 2017

    Gas burnerStandard electric heaters turn roughly one unit of electricity into one unit of heat. A reverse cycle air conditioner, however, uses electricity to 'pump' heat from one place to another and is incredibly efficient. Using electricity from the grid creates more pollution than burning gas, but the electric reverse cycle air conditioner is so efficient it's still less damaging overall. That's great news for households with air con, but galling for anyone who can't afford one, or isn't allowed to install it.

  • Don't turn away from dire child abuse stats

    4 Comments
    Barry Gittins | 25 May 2017

    Child on wet footpathAustralian kids are being bashed, raped, starved, scorned and otherwise treated with no dignity or kindness. The study states it is not simply a case of one-off abuse, noting that 'research has demonstrated that maltreatment sub-types seldom occur in isolation (e.g. sexual abuse is often accompanied by psychological maltreatment or physical abuse)'. That is difficult reading. It makes me sick to write it. But the paper should, in a just society, serve as a catalyst for a national conversation.

  • Preserving and pillaging privacy

    6 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 25 May 2017

    Padlock computer keyIn each of us is a personal centre able to reflect, to wonder, to explore the world and to evaluate it, to long and to love, to make decisions, and to engage freely with other human beings. Privacy is the gate that allows us to leave and others to enter the garden of our deepest selves. If it is torn off its hinges we shall live on a shallow level, preoccupied with defending ourselves. That is why the invasion of our privacy by governments and corporations in order to control our lives is unjustifiable.

  • Philippines coming full, sordid circle

    2 Comments
    Fatima Measham | 25 May 2017

    DuterteNone of what continues to unravel in the Philippines is a shock. In August last year, barely more than a month from inauguration, Duterte mentioned the prospect of martial law in relation to his drug war. Duterte is the sixth president since the 1986 People Power revolution that overthrew Marcos. He is a close associate of the dictator's children. Martial law was long in play before the incidents in Marawi this week, and is in character for an ex-mayor with alleged links to 'death squads'.

  • Gonski in an age of budget repair

    12 Comments
    Frank Brennan | 24 May 2017

    Study notesThe level of consultation prior to the announced changes was appalling. But that is water under the bridge. It's time to enunciate some clear principles, and for respectful consultations to take place investigating how those principles can be best applied. This must be done within the realistic political environment in which we find ourselves. At the same time the Catholic system should ensure its schools are more available to the poor, enacting Pope Francis's desire for 'a Church which is poor and for the poor'.

  • Strong women heroes of grim abduction parables

    1 Comment
    Tim Kroenert | 24 May 2017

    If two current Australian films are anything to go by, then one social issue weighing on local filmmakers in 2017 is the danger to women of emotionally and physically violent men. Neither film is a mere portrait of victimhood. The heroes of Cate Shortland's recent Berlin Syndrome and Ben Young's upcoming Hounds of Love - in the former, an Australian traveller in Europe, in the latter, a teenage school girl in suburban Perth - are ordinary women with both the will and capacity to fight back against their assailants.

  • Catholic citizens needed within the Church

    36 Comments
    John Warhurst | 23 May 2017

    Kristina Keneally, Marilyn Hatton and Francis Sullivan presented at the public forum for Concerned Catholics of Canberra-Goulburn, and are pictured here with John Warhurst (far left).Catholics have a proud record of exercising their democratic rights within Australian democracy as voters, members of political parties and lobby groups, and as elected representatives. But within their own church they have been taught to leave their democratic rights at the door. Now is the time to challenge that norm in parishes, dioceses and the wider church. In responding to the royal commission the church needs an infusion of democratic values, including transparency and accountability.

  • Still fighting for our rights 50 years after the referendum

    4 Comments
    Dani Larkin | 22 May 2017

    Protestors march for Aboriginal citizenship rightsAn interesting aspect was the shift in the mindset and understanding among non-indigenous Australians regarding Aboriginal rights. To note the way in which one dominating western culture moved toward recognising the rights of another culture that was oppressed by it is quite remarkable. We should consider those aspects of the mentality shift (from both cultures and their understanding of what the 1967 referendum meant) if we are ever to revisit that type of federal movement again.

  • If you vote for me

    2 Comments
    Bill Rush, Marlene Marburg, Maureen O'Brien, John Cranmer | 22 May 2017

    CloudsCars will be turned into flutes; sheep graze in public parks. Trams will be lined with books; prisons, wisteria-walled. Politicians will sing in choirs; accountants taught to tango. The old will have honour and cake and a licence for practical jokes. The middle-aged will lie on grass and watch the procession of clouds. The young will be loved and learn that to live is to be slowly born.


Featured Writers

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "For the traveller, these ever tighter-restrictions have already turned a commonplace activity into one riddled with fear and mistrust."
     read more

     

  • Greg Foyster

    Greg Foyster headshot

    "It's another example of how clean, green and efficient technologies still aren't accessible to everyone. This is a massive injustice in the making."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "It only took a few paragraphs in this article for the miraculous, life-saving device to become a futuristic dystopian tool of oppression."
     read more

     

  • Tseen Khoo

    Tseen Khoo

    "I have never felt as uneasy in Australia as I do now."
     read more

     

  • S01E08: Comey dismissal and the Australian federal budget

    Podcast | 16 May 2017

    Chattersquare logoWe come to grips with the dismissal of FBI director James Comey. Is this about optics, process or something else? Then we turn to a more sedate pace in Australia, where the federal budget has neither damaged or boosted the Turnbull government. We finish with a few ways to stay intact in a tumultuous world.

  • ChatterSquare S01E07: Good or bad debt, the first 100 days of Trump, and Pope Francis talks TED

    Podcast | 02 May 2017

    Chattersquare logoIs there such a thing as bad debt when it comes to national budgets? Is infrastructure spending a great idea by default? We also take a glance at the first 100 days of the Trump presidency. As an antidote, we finish with a quick reflection on the latest moves by Pope Francis.

  • ChatterSquare S01E06: John Clarke, the federal budget, United Airlines

    1 Comment
    Podcast | 20 April 2017

    Chattersquare logoOn this episode, we take a moment to remember satirist John Clarke. Then we do an initial read of the story that the Australian federal budget might tell. We also break down that United Airlines incident. There might be detours, so stick close.

  • ChatterSquare S01E05: Moscow connections and the persistence of coal

    Podcast | 06 April 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we try to take a knife through Donald Trump's entanglements with Russia. We also discuss coalcare, which is like government insurance for terminal fossil fuel industries. We finish with a quick note on a couple of films that have not been well-received.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Democracy (for better or worse)

    Podcast | 30 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoWe turn to the Philippines, nearly a year from the elections that made Rodrigo Duterte president. Along with other ructions from 2016, his presidency continues to raise questions about the nature of democracy. To help us make sense of the current moment, we talk to Christopher Tan, a Manila-based lawyer with a public policy background.


WEEK IN POLITICS



Elementary

Fiona Katauskas

Sherlock Holmes tries to discover which isn't fake: the refugee application form, the news according to Peter Dutton, or the ALP moral compass. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


» View full size



Trending on Eureka Street


Support us

Eureka Street is completely free of charge – however it costs a significant amount of money to provide our unique content.

If you are a regular reader and are able to support us financially, please consider making a donation.

Donate »