• Feature Article

    The Goodes, the bad and the ugly

    1 Comment
    Fiona Katauskas |  View this week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.
  • Feature Article

    Why we aren’t more shocked by Nauru revelations

    2 Comments
    Tim Robertson |  The politicians have an excuse: they have vested interests. But what about the rest of us? Has the rape and torture of asylum seekers, many of them children, in institutions established at the behest of Canberra, become so commonplace that it no longer shocks? It's not that empathy is an emotion particularly lacking in Australia. But there remains a disconnect between 'us' and asylum seekers.
  • Feature Article

    Goodes, Gillard, and Australia's sick culture of victim-blaming

    16 Comments
    Megan Graham |  Someone yells a racial slur at you while you were just trying to do your job. Then you get booed for months for publicly celebrating your cultural heritage. You might think, how can anyone say this is okay? With the evidence brought to light, how can it be denied or, worse, condoned? But the truth is that siding with the bully or perpetrator is psychologically far easier for your average self-serving person.
  • Feature Article

    Should Labor break ties with the unions?

    14 Comments
    John Warhurst |  The formal link between trade unions and the Labor Party is sacred in many quarters, and has sustained both sides of the relationship for 120 years. The revelations of the Royal Commission into Trade Union Governance and Corruption, despite its anti-Labor political origins, may eventually generate change. But the question has been around for decades, and any move to break the link would be vigorously opposed.
  • Feature Article

    All deaths great and small

    Brian Matthews |  Many deaths of course are not small deaths. They evoke distinction, achievement, leadership, innovation, creativity or, in some cases notoriety, quixoticism or eccentricity. Yet placing some names above many, some in a class of their own, others in a ruck of the scarcely memorable, one indispensable criterion unites all the characters and places them beyond our imaginative, intellectual or descriptive reach: they are dead.
  • Feature Article

    Speaking for others in the public square

    4 Comments
    Frank Brennan |  Walking towards the courthouse, I heard a cry, 'Hey, Father Frank, over here! You've got to support us mob.' I was torn. I was chairing a national consultation at the request of the Commonwealth Government. I did not want to politicise our presence in town. But then again, I did not want to abandon Ben and his colleagues in their hour of need. They all stood in front of an Aboriginal flag. Some were crying out for justice for their deceased loved one.

Why we aren’t more shocked by Nauru revelations

Tim Robertson | 05 August 2015

Thomas Paine's Rights of ManThe politicians have an excuse: they have vested interests. But what about the rest of us? Has the rape and torture of asylum seekers, many of them children, in institutions established at the behest of Canberra, become so commonplace that it no longer shocks? It's not that empathy is an emotion particularly lacking in Australia. But there remains a disconnect between 'us' and asylum seekers.

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  • Greece's lonely season

    Jena Woodhouse | 04 August 2015

    PomegranateA tarnished pomegranate warms the chill niche of the windowsill, mottled like a faded kilim, mellow rose, dull gold; the island in the autumn thrums to lyres of the bourini, the pagan tongues of log fires in the chimneys; ancient ferries plying the Aegean in the winter run the gauntlet of the gales like emissaries of reason. It is the lonely season.

  • Goodes, Gillard, and Australia's sick culture of victim-blaming

    16 Comments
    Megan Graham | 04 August 2015

    Adam GoodesSomeone yells a racial slur at you while you were just trying to do your job. Then you get booed for months for publicly celebrating your cultural heritage. You might think, how can anyone say this is okay? With the evidence brought to light, how can it be denied or, worse, condoned? But the truth is that siding with the bully or perpetrator is psychologically far easier for your average self-serving person.

  • Australian academics right to resist respected global warming skeptic

    7 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 03 August 2015

    Bjorn LomborgLomborg's profile was built by a book on global warming in which he accepted its reality, but argued its effects would not be as catastrophic as predicted. He is a good media performer whose métier is not scholarship but popularisation. Universities, which claim that their activities are characterised by depth, appoint people with higher scholarly credentials and research experience to lead their research centres.

  • Should Labor break ties with the unions?

    14 Comments
    John Warhurst | 03 August 2015

    Australian Labor PartyThe formal link between trade unions and the Labor Party is sacred in many quarters, and has sustained both sides of the relationship for 120 years. The revelations of the Royal Commission into Trade Union Governance and Corruption, despite its anti-Labor political origins, may eventually generate change. But the question has been around for decades, and any move to break the link would be vigorously opposed.

  • Rich retirees may need the aged pension

    4 Comments
    David James | 31 July 2015

    Chris Johnston artworkThere has been great pressure on both of the major political parties to stop giving so-called rich retirees partial pension income. The conventional view has become that retired millionaires should not be feeding off the public teat. But in terms of income, many of those 'rich retirees' would actually be better off on the pension.

  • Celebrity fury not enough to tame lion killers

    5 Comments
    Catherine Marshall | 31 July 2015

    Hunter Walter James Palmer, left, with another lion he killed.The epidemic of African wildlife poaching returned to the headlines this week with news that an American hunter had killed a much-loved lion, Cecil, in Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park. Such 'leisure activities' speak to a base instinct to control, brutalise and defeat. Yet the outpouring of fury at Cecil's killer by celebrities and the public on social media platforms feels somewhat hypocritical and opportunistic.

  • The ethical consequences of making the ALP electable

    27 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 30 July 2015

    Anti-turnbacks rallyLabor's National Conference endorsement of boat turnbacks does raise questions, as policies are not merely pieces of paper. They are statements of value, in this case about vulnerable and desperate humans. If, under our policies, we inflict pain for other purposes, it will come back to haunt us.

  • Skank-shaming Amy Schumer

    3 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 30 July 2015

    Amy Schumer and Bill Hader in TrainwreckIt's not hard to see why Amy Schumer was offended. Last week, Melbourne KIIS FM breakfast co-host Matt Tilley earned the ire of the proudly feminist comedian by suggesting one of her characters is a 'skank'. The sleight comes not just from Tilley apparently missing the fact that the story is semi-autobiographical. It sits far too easily in a tradition of harmful double standards regarding male and female sexuality.

  • Political donations reform is not so easy

    5 Comments
    Jack Maxwell | 29 July 2015

    Suited man holding dollar signPolitical donations give privileged access to powerful public officials to those who are wealthy. But public funding does little to reduce parties’ reliance on private money and radical control measures can fall foul of the Constitution. A 2013 High Court judgment finding that a ban on donations infringed the constitutional freedom of political communication.

  • Booing Adam Goodes

    31 Comments
    Michael McVeigh | 29 July 2015

    Adam GoodesWhat is the difference between people who boo Goodes because they disagree with his statements on Aboriginality, and those who lined the streets of Selma to abuse Martin Luther King and his companions on their marches? What they are doing is designed to further marginalise and alienate Aboriginal voices brave enough to speak out against the status quo. The actions of those booing Goodes need to be called out for what they are - racism.

  • The problematic 'saving lives at sea' argument

    35 Comments
    Kerry Murphy | 28 July 2015

    Bill Shorten at ALP National Conference 2015When refugee advocates criticise harsh policies such as boat turnbacks, they are confronted with claims that the measures are necessary for saving lives at sea. This justification has dominated the debate to the extent that any policy which further restricts refugee rights becomes justifiable on this ground. Imagine a proposal to ban cars because there were too many people killed and injured on the roads.


  • Doogue, Brereton on keeping faith in the face of the abuse crisis

    3 Comments
    Peter Kirkwood | 05 August 2015

    'The question for me is: Is the Catholic Church at it's most authentic when it is covering up child abuse?' asks Adam Brereton, opinion editor for The Guardian Australia. Eureka Street TV's Peter Kirkwood talks to Catholic convert Brereton and 'cradle Catholic' Gerladine Doogue about the effect that the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse is having on Australian believers.

  • Homily for the Feast of St Ignatius Loyola

    1 Comment
    Frank Brennan | 03 August 2015

    Religion blog logoI am one of those Jesuits who sometimes has been perceived as not being sufficiently loyal to the church hierarchy. From time to time, people of good will have urged me to consider Ignatius' rules for thinking with the Church which are appended to his Spiritual Exercises. The stereotypical view of those rules is often summed up by quoting the first sentence of the 13th rule: 'To keep ourselves right in all things, we ought to hold fast to this principle: What I see as white, I would believe to be black if the hierarchical Church would thus determine it.' But life was not ever that simple, even in the time of Ignatius. Feast of St Ignatius homily by Frank Brennan

  • Zen and the art of wealth amassment

    4 Comments
    Ellena Savage | 17 July 2015

    There is a suburban myth about migrant families. The first generation toil, the second become professionals, and the third artists. Like all dynasties, the Rineharts are destined to one day represent the crusty relics of former glory. That's fine. I mean, why would the beneficiaries of other people's obsessive toils and struggle work, if they didn't have to?

  • Carefully burning Scientology

    11 Comments
    Tim Kroenert | 09 July 2015

    Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of BeliefIf you're going to apply a blowtorch to an institution as wealthy and litigious as the Church of Scientology, you might best be advised to first apply a magnifying glass. Alex Gibney details the dark side of the movement: its dubious tax-exempt status; allegations of psychological and physical abuse of current members and harassment of former members. But he is equally interested in unpacking the nature of belief in Scientology: what draws people to it, and also what drives them away.

  • Coal warriors targeting Pope Francis

    28 Comments
    Neil Ormerod | 15 July 2015

    Cover of Laudato SiIt is not surprising that The Australian should be leading the local pushback on the environmental encyclical Laudato Si'. What is surprising is that a Catholic priest - Fr James Grant - should be joining the chorus against the encyclical, initially in an IPA media release. His more recent contribution to The Australian is right out of the briefing notes supplied by the coal industry in its global public relations efforts to shore up its waning reputation. 


WEEK IN POLITICS



The Goodes, the bad and the ugly

Fiona Katauskas

Fiona Katauskas' cartoon 'The Goodes, the Bad and the Ugly' portrays various situations of Aboriginal people being victimised then being blamed for acting like victims


View this week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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