• Feature Article

    Indigenous citizenship rights 40 years after the referendum

    7 Comments
    Dani Larkin |  In the face of historically low levels of Indigenous representation in our parliaments, the Indigenous caucus between Commonwealth, State and Territory Labor representatives points to some progress. It is aimed at increasing Indigenous voter engagement figures, increasing Indigenous Labor candidacy, and developing strategic plans that encourage Indigenous students to become young leaders in Parliament. Those are all necessary and noteworthy causes. But we have a long way to go.
  • Feature Article

    Don't underestimate the politics of hate

    14 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton |  The Prioress in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales had a brooch alluding to Virgil's phrase, 'love conquers all'. In her case, her love for her two lapdogs beat her affection for mere people. But in public life one wonders about the truth of the epigram. Indeed a good case could be made that hatred conquers all, and that it is stronger than love. The advent of Donald Trump with his individual style has occasioned lament that the public world is now dominated by hatred and contempt. But there is nothing new in it.
  • Feature Article

    Asian women breaking free of the stereotype straitjacket

    6 Comments
    Tseen Khoo |  Last week, an interview by the BBC with a scholarly expert on Korea was interrupted by the scholar's young family. What fascinated me most was the assumption in certain commentaries that the woman in the video was the nanny. Or, even when that was resoundingly countered, that there would be trouble for her when the interview was over. Because she is Asian, and her husband is white. And we all know what that means, right? Whether she's the nanny or the wife, she must be oppressed.
  • Feature Article

    Towards a more inclusive religious curriculum

    16 Comments
    Sophie Chalmers |  The Dalai Lama is turning 82 this July, and he may be the last in his line. The religious and political ramifications of this are often lost on the general public. Many people in largely Christian Australia don't know the significance of a Mikveh in Judaism, can't explain why the Buddhist Middle Path is so important, or recite what the Five Pillars of Islam are. There are as many diverse interpretations of Hinduism as there are for Christianity, and as many insightful Buddhist stories as there are in the Bible.
  • Rethinking and reconstructing youth justice

    Terry Laidler | 24 March 2017

    Silhouette of boy and barsMany of the kids in the juvenile justice system have been abused, come from dysfunctional families or state care, or have untreated behavioural or mental health problems. Warehousing them in punishing idleness and expecting passive compliance, let alone any recovery, is fanciful. I have begun to think about how we could respond to these kids in a holistic way, with a strong emphasis on prevention and diversion. These proposals relate to current the system in Victoria, but generalise easily.

  • Indigenous citizenship rights 40 years after the referendum

    7 Comments
    Dani Larkin | 23 March 2017

    Front page of Abo Call newspaperIn the face of historically low levels of Indigenous representation in our parliaments, the Indigenous caucus between Commonwealth, State and Territory Labor representatives points to some progress. It is aimed at increasing Indigenous voter engagement figures, increasing Indigenous Labor candidacy, and developing strategic plans that encourage Indigenous students to become young leaders in Parliament. Those are all necessary and noteworthy causes. But we have a long way to go.

  • Gambling on the fat dollar

    2 Comments
    Rachel Woodlock | 23 March 2017

    Model wearing Nike's plus-size rangeElite athletes wear Nike. Celebrities wear Nike. Beautiful people. People who take their sports seriously. Well, that's what decades of advertising around the little swooshy tick and 'Just Do It' trademark told us. Fat girls don't deserve to wear Nike because they are supposed to feel ashamed of their ample girths. They should exercise, of course, but in sackcloth and ashes, with downcast faces, signalling they understand their moral depravity. Some people, it seems, still feel that's the way it should be.

  • Don't underestimate the politics of hate

    14 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 22 March 2017

    Face expressing hatredThe Prioress in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales had a brooch alluding to Virgil's phrase, 'love conquers all'. In her case, her love for her two lapdogs beat her affection for mere people. But in public life one wonders about the truth of the epigram. Indeed a good case could be made that hatred conquers all, and that it is stronger than love. The advent of Donald Trump with his individual style has occasioned lament that the public world is now dominated by hatred and contempt. But there is nothing new in it.

  • A life in song for the working class

    4 Comments
    Tony Smith | 22 March 2017

    Danny SpoonerDanny sang of farm labourers, poachers, mariners, union martyrs and miners. He did not simply perform the songs - that would be too much like exploiting them. His aim was to help preserve them. When he introduced a song it was clear that he had great respect for the tradition in which he fitted and that he had done extensive research into the song's provenance. The songs were important because of how they recorded aspects of working class life which mainstream histories might neglect.

  • The time-traveller's strife

    Tim Kroenert | 22 March 2017

    All stories that deal with time travel will come up against paradoxes. Generally the success of the story will come down to how capably these paradoxes are dealt with, and how consistently with the story's internal logic. Otto Bloom turns on the concept of time as an extension of the physical dimensions. If time is as tangible as physical space, then all events in time are occurring simultaneously. That we perceive time as moving in a particular direction is a feature of our human consciousness.

  • Towards a more inclusive religious curriculum

    16 Comments
    Sophie Chalmers | 21 March 2017

    Children of different faiths sharing. Illustration by Chris JohnstonThe Dalai Lama is turning 82 this July, and he may be the last in his line. The religious and political ramifications of this are often lost on the general public. Many people in largely Christian Australia don't know the significance of a Mikveh in Judaism, can't explain why the Buddhist Middle Path is so important, or recite what the Five Pillars of Islam are. There are as many diverse interpretations of Hinduism as there are for Christianity, and as many insightful Buddhist stories as there are in the Bible.

  • Asian women breaking free of the stereotype straitjacket

    6 Comments
    Tseen Khoo | 21 March 2017

    Prof Robert E Kelly keeps his cool during an interview about South Korean politics when his two children interrupt him, live on air, on BBC World News. Last week, an interview by the BBC with a scholarly expert on Korea was interrupted by the scholar's young family. What fascinated me most was the assumption in certain commentaries that the woman in the video was the nanny. Or, even when that was resoundingly countered, that there would be trouble for her when the interview was over. Because she is Asian, and her husband is white. And we all know what that means, right? Whether she's the nanny or the wife, she must be oppressed.

  • The rule of law applies to government too

    15 Comments
    Kate Galloway | 20 March 2017

    Centrelink officeACTU secretary Sally McManus' comments about the rule of law have sparked a lot of chatter on news and social media. While the rule of law arguably does assume citizens will obey the law, it also assumes government will behave lawfully. Further, it might be argued that the rule of law encompasses the principled application of government power. In this respect, the Australian government is itself falling well below adhering to the rule of law. I offer Centrelink #notmydebt as a case study.


Featured Writers

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "Perhaps it is enough to remember that the rule of law is often invoked by those who benefit from the status quo."
     read more

     

  • Francine Crimmins

    Francine Crimmins

    "This is not just an Irish struggle, but one endured by Indigenous Australians and anyone else affected by colonial disruption."
     read more

     

  • Frank Brennan

    Frank Brennan headshot

    "Simply leaving 18C unamended is not a sensible option. It's broke, so fix it!"
     read more

     

  • Tseen Khoo

    Tseen Khoo

    "For Asian women in Australia, this can mean a very particular kind of creepy fetishisation and erasure of the self."
     read more

     

  • ChatterSquare S01E04: Weatherill, the Snowy and neutrality

    Podcast | 21 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we touch on energy, infrastructure and the political lens through which we receive nation-building ideas. We talk about Jay Weatherill, the South Australian Premier, who gave a master class this week in how to make federal ministers squirm. We also ask whether it is possible for journalists to remain neutral, a quarter into the Trump presidency.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Is Justin Trudeau really all that?

    Podcast | 14 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoJustin Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada in 2015, taking the Liberal Party to a strong majority after nearly a decade of Conservative rule. He signaled many things that were seen as progressive. But is he really all that? In this episode of ChatterSquare Extra, we catch up with Neal Jennings, Canadian politics nerd, who joins us from Vancouver.

  • ChatterSquare S01E03: Turnbull, catharsis and scapegoating

    Podcast | 07 March 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we feel a bit sorry for Malcolm Turnbull and wonder whether the electorate even cares who is leader anymore. We also discuss scapegoating and how attempts to discriminate lead to indiscriminate effects.

  • ChatterSquare Extra: Reading history in the age of Trump

    Podcast | 28 February 2017

    Chattersquare logoIn this episode, we chat with Dr Evan Smith, from the School of History and International Relations at Flinders University, Adelaide. We go over some of the historical analogies being made about the Trump administration, why people are drawn to them, and the pitfalls of reaching into the past to make sense of the present.

  • ChatterSquare S01E02: Hansonism, fear and fantasy

    Podcast | 21 February 2017

    Chattersquare logoIs there an upside to Hansonism? In this episode, we try to figure out what One Nation actually has to offer. We also talk about fear and how some Americans are dealing with the Trump era by turning to fantasy literature. Is this just escapism?


WEEK IN POLITICS



It's all in the timing

Fiona Katauskas

Opponents of 18C chant for the right to be bigots on Harmony Day. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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