• Feature Article

    Religious media cuts undermine harmony

    1 Comment
    Kasy Chambers |  There has been a slow trickle of news outlets in Australia winding back their coverage of religion over recent years. Some might argue that this is a good thing in a secular democracy, and that discussion of religion creates division. This however flies in the face of the overwhelming good that religious belief, and religious-based organisations, do in this country. Not to mention the fact that religion and ethics are a major part of the narrative of society, of how we live together and how we form a community.
  • Feature Article

    Watching the 'mixed bag' Senate cross bench at work

    John Warhurst |  To say the Senate cross bench is a mixed bag is an understatement. All that is really lacking is an extreme left senator unrestrained by Labor/Green discipline. Amid all the controversy I've grown comfortable with their place in the Senate and appreciative of their collective presence in an otherwise party dominated chamber. They each have their flaws, but they make a generally positive contribution to public discussion and to ultimate legislative outcomes. We are better off for their presence.
  • Feature Article

    Aboriginal workers still slipping through the gaps

    5 Comments
    Celeste Liddle |  Indigenous workers of previous generations struggled and undertook strike actions so that their descendants would not be exploited and abused in the same way that they had been. While we may have many more Aboriginal people achieving and attracting higher waged work than we did in the years gone by, the exploitation of the most vulnerable in our community continues. The years may have ticked over, but the government's attitude to the value of Indigenous workers has not.
  • Watching the 'mixed bag' Senate cross bench at work

    John Warhurst | 05 December 2016

    Derryn HinchTo say the Senate cross bench is a mixed bag is an understatement. All that is really lacking is an extreme left senator unrestrained by Labor/Green discipline. Amid all the controversy I've grown comfortable with their place in the Senate and appreciative of their collective presence in an otherwise party dominated chamber. They each have their flaws, but they make a generally positive contribution to public discussion and to ultimate legislative outcomes. We are better off for their presence.

  • No vacancy at the inn (or anywhere else in Australia)

    Marlene Marburg | 05 December 2016

    No Vacancy signPlease god of the fit and strong, forbid we should become 'the un-lucky country'. Help us to conjure the nerve to say, There is no room for you here in Australia. No vacancies. All full up. You will be turned away while you are trying to give your family respite from poverty or war. We have no room for you. We are using our space for shops. And Christmas trees.

  • Religious media cuts undermine harmony

    1 Comment
    Kasy Chambers | 05 December 2016

    John ClearyThere has been a slow trickle of news outlets in Australia winding back their coverage of religion over recent years. Some might argue that this is a good thing in a secular democracy, and that discussion of religion creates division. This however flies in the face of the overwhelming good that religious belief, and religious-based organisations, do in this country. Not to mention the fact that religion and ethics are a major part of the narrative of society, of how we live together and how we form a community.

  • Why the seal of the confessional should remain in tact

    1 Comment
    Frank Brennan | 05 December 2016

    ConfessionalOne distinctively Catholic practice is personal confession in which an individual confesses to God their sins and seeks forgiveness in the presence of and at the hands of a priest. Some groups and individuals are proposing to the royal commission that the seal of the confessional no longer be inviolable. I was quoted in The Australian saying, 'If a law is introduced to say that a priest should reveal a confession, I'm one of those priests who will disobey the law.' Being also a lawyer, let me explain.

  • Aboriginal workers still slipping through the gaps

    5 Comments
    Celeste Liddle | 02 December 2016

    Cartoon by Chris JohnstonIndigenous workers of previous generations struggled and undertook strike actions so that their descendants would not be exploited and abused in the same way that they had been. While we may have many more Aboriginal people achieving and attracting higher waged work than we did in the years gone by, the exploitation of the most vulnerable in our community continues. The years may have ticked over, but the government's attitude to the value of Indigenous workers has not.

  • How to relieve poverty in India without endangering the planet

    7 Comments
    Frank Brennan | 02 December 2016

    Frank Brennan delivers Tata lectureNeither India nor Australia can go it alone when confronting a global issue such as climate change. India cannot disregard the effects on other nations when it adopts laws and policies for alleviating the poverty of the poorest of the poor. Australia cannot disregard the effects on other nations when it considers restricting the availability of resources for export such as coal which might help provide electricity for the world's poorest citizens.

  • Learning self-respect in newborn baby hell

    2 Comments
    Suvi Mahonen | 01 December 2016

    Crying babyFrom the moment my newborn daughter woke me, my day became a litany of bodily requirements. Pee, drink, change nappy, feed, burp, feed, drink, soothe, pump breasts, change nappy, feed, burp, feed, soothe, eat, drink, soothe. As for healthy living? Forget it. I sucked on spoonfuls of peanut butter and ate family-sized blocks of chocolate. And if I was lucky enough to snatch a yoga stretch in between bouts of colic, it was to the tinkling melodies of her play gym rather than Sanskrit mantras.

  • Our first female High Court chief justice is first class

    10 Comments
    Moira Rayner | 30 November 2016

    Susan KiefelSo the High Court finally has its first woman chief justice. Mainstream media have seized upon this as a remarkable achievement for the legal profession and as 'a fair go' for the empowered woman of 2016. Kiefel's attainment of her highest goal should be recognised as no such lesser win. It is right and proper recognition of the suitability of a solidly trained and experienced lawyer, and the product of this individual human being's commitment to the law and its customs, protocols and conventions.

  • Tackling porn and alcohol key to family violence responses

    10 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 30 November 2016

    Man threatening womanOne of the weaknesses in our society is its lack of effective regulations governing the marketing and availability of alcohol. A second is the ready availability of pornography, as many young men learn how to behave towards women from sadistic and explicit pornography. In the case of the lack of restrictions on the availability of both, churches concerned to respond to domestic violence will need to meet the libertarian objections to regulating profitable business and individual behaviour.

  • History comes to strife in Stratford-upon-Avon

    3 Comments
    Patrick McCabe | 29 November 2016

    Stratford-upon-AvonSomeone I read in high school, so probably Shakespeare, once said 'The past is a foreign country, they do things differently there.' Well, whoever it was clearly hadn't been to Stratford-upon-Avon (so maybe not Shakespeare then). Here, you truly can visit the past, without a passport. As one peruses the shops, houses, supermarkets and ATMs, one cannot help but speculate as to the links between Shakespeare's works and what must have been the commonplaces of his everyday life.

  • Queering the airwaves for TV diversity

    16 Comments
    Adolfo Aranjuez | 29 November 2016

    Josh Thomas in Please Like MeA recent Screen Australia report determined only 5 per cent of characters in Australian TV dramas could be identified as LGBTQI; less than half the proportion of real-world queer individuals in Australia. Media products are inherently normative, legitimising identities and lived realities through visibility. This is important, given the continuing debates surrounding marriage equality and the pervasiveness of homophobia, the result of which was seen in the suicide of 13-year-old Tyrone Unsworth.


Featured Writers

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "In such a world, it's small wonder that boys grow up into men who believe that women's bodies exist for their pleasure."
     read more

     

  • David James

    David James headshot

    "The issue is not whether or not there will be jobs, but how fair the wages system will be."
     read more

     

  • Ellena Savage

    Ellena Savage headshot

    "How terrible that the body perceives its limitations. How rude that we are dumb carnal things and not pure radiant magic."
     read more

     

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "The fervent response against the Marcos burial reminds us that authoritarian populists are not necessarily invincible."
     read more

     

  • Justin Glyn

    Justin Glyn

    "If this interlocking set of horrors teaches any lessons, it should be to accept media narratives with caution."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "As long as HIV remains a focus of criminal law, in particular in light of the ongoing stigma of HIV-positive people, it remains important to use this law judiciously."
     read more

     

  • Coffee and birdsong

    17 Comments
    Mary Manning | 09 November 2016

    Woman barista'Pull the levers, scoop the coffee, flatten it, steam fragrant liquid into white cups. My lever-pulling right arm has huge muscles from my coffee ballet. Around me: the buzz of conversations about people's plans for their day. No one knows I am lonely.' Short story by former Eureka Street editorial assistant Mary Manning, who died on Tuesday 8 November 2016.

  • New Jesuit General's feeling for the political periphery

    6 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 07 November 2016

    Fr Adolfo Nicolas SJ with Fr General Arturo Sosa SJOrdinarily I wouldn't dare to say political leaders have anything to learn from Jesuits. But these are the kind of extraordinary times of anxiety and flux that led ancient rulers to consult oracles, read tea leaves and look at the flight of birds. People fret because their future and pockets rise and fall on the tide of of would-be presidents. In the sour slurry of discontent and puzzlement the election of a Venezuelan political scientist as international leader of the Jesuits provides material for broader reflection.

  • Margaret Dooley Young Writers Fellowship

    Staff | 31 October 2016

    Young woman writer

    The Margaret Dooley Young Writers Fellowship is offered to support the development of young Australian writers aged 15–25.

  • Seven warnings for Queensland as it considers a human rights act

    1 Comment
    Frank Brennan | 31 October 2016

    'First warning: if you're going to be serious about a Human Rights Act, make sure that your government departments are sufficiently resourced and encouraged to produce meaningful statements of compatibility. Second warning, especially in a unicameral legislature: make sure that your parliamentary committee on human rights has sufficient muscle and status to arrest the progress of any bill until it has been thoroughly scrutinised for human rights compliance.' Frank Brennan's remarks at the Fringe Conference of the 2016 Queensland ALP Convention.

  • Faith and humanism behind Tim Winton's curtain

    1 Comment
    Tim Kroenert | 26 October 2016

    Tim Winton, The Boy Behind the Curtain'When I was a kid I liked to stand at the window with a rifle and aim it at people.' So begins the opening, titular essay. It is a singularly arresting entre to an essay that charts the author's complex relationship with firearms (part awe, part terror), by way of commenting on the place of guns in Australian society. In this collection of essays Winton adopts this mode frequently, weaving (sometimes deeply) personal narratives into stirring, thoughtful commentary on a broad range of social and political issues.


WEEK IN POLITICS



The writing on the wall

Fiona Katauskas

Graffiti artist writes Muslims Out on a wall. The next day someone has changed it to Take Muslims Out To Lunch. Cartoon by Fiona Katauskas


This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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