• Feature Article

    Why the seal of the confessional will remain

    Frank Brennan |  The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse has published a 2000-page three volume Criminal Justice Report. One of its recommendations is that the states and territories 'create a criminal offence of failure to report targeted at child sexual abuse in an institutional context'.
  • Feature Article

    Getting some perspective on Charlottesville

    8 Comments
    Fatima Measham |  Instead of refining his initial remarks about a Nazi rally in Charlottesville, which brutally claimed the life of a counter-protester, Donald Trump has doubled down. At a heated news conference in New York, he demanded that journalists define 'alt-right', invoked the idea of an 'alt-left', and lay blame on 'both sides'.
  • Feature Article

    The renewables debate is won, but we may still lose the war

    1 Comment
    Greg Foyster |  In the last few years, vested interests have changed their strategy for opposing action on climate change. Where they once focused on denying the problem, they’re now putting their efforts into sabotaging the solutions. Instead of funding fake experts to say the ‘science isn’t settled’, fossil fuel companies and their political backers have been running a smear campaign against renewable energy technologies like wind turbines, solar panels and batteries.
  • Feature Article

    Of murderers, bastards and inequality: neo-liberalism's failure

    13 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton |  Cometh the hour, cometh the third murderer. So now inequality is in the spotlight and is being booed off the stage. It is blamed for the rise of populist politics, and more fundamentally for economic stagnation. The economic neo-liberal orthodoxy, that so implausibly claimed that economic competition unfettered by government regulation would benefit all of the citizens, has produced the gross inequality that hinders economic growth.
  • Feature Article

    David v Goliath in the beautiful British countryside

    Megan Graham |  One lone man daring to interfere with the evil plans of the rich and powerful: it’s not exactly a new angle, but there are a few scraps of satisfaction to be found in Joel Hopkin’s latest film Hampstead – just not in the realm of originality. It’s a sleepy story that meanders along with a mildly pleasant mediocrity.
  • Feature Article

    The high political stakes of same sex marriage

    33 Comments
    John Warhurst |  The same sex marriage postal plebiscite will be as intense as most referendum and election campaigns. Indeed, the special characteristics of this subject, advanced by the government as the reason for going beyond parliamentary means to resolve the issue, mean that the campaign may be more intense than most referendums have been.
  • Why the seal of the confessional will remain

    Frank Brennan | 20 August 2017

    xxxxxThe Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse has published a 2000-page three volume Criminal Justice Report. One of its recommendations is that the states and territories 'create a criminal offence of failure to report targeted at child sexual abuse in an institutional context'.

  • The lessons learned from charitable work

    Mariana James-Techera | 19 August 2017

    xxxxxWe students go to school to learn. But one of the best learning experiences for me has happened outside school: helping the less fortunate by serving them food at the Sacred Heart Mission and collecting food necessities for the charity.

  • The renewables debate is won, but we may still lose the war

    1 Comment
    Greg Foyster | 17 August 2017

    xxxxxIn the last few years, vested interests have changed their strategy for opposing action on climate change. Where they once focused on denying the problem, they’re now putting their efforts into sabotaging the solutions. Instead of funding fake experts to say the ‘science isn’t settled’, fossil fuel companies and their political backers have been running a smear campaign against renewable energy technologies like wind turbines, solar panels and batteries.

  • Getting some perspective on Charlottesville

    8 Comments
    Fatima Measham | 17 August 2017

    xxxxx

    Instead of refining his initial remarks about a Nazi rally in Charlottesville, which brutally claimed the life of a counter-protester, Donald Trump has doubled down. At a heated news conference in New York, he demanded that journalists define 'alt-right', invoked the idea of an 'alt-left', and lay blame on 'both sides'.

  • Of murderers, bastards and inequality: neo-liberalism's failure

    13 Comments
    Andrew Hamilton | 16 August 2017

    xxxxxCometh the hour, cometh the third murderer. So now inequality is in the spotlight and is being booed off the stage. It is blamed for the rise of populist politics, and more fundamentally for economic stagnation. The economic neo-liberal orthodoxy, that so implausibly claimed that economic competition unfettered by government regulation would benefit all of the citizens, has produced the gross inequality that hinders economic growth. 

  • David v Goliath in the beautiful British countryside

    Megan Graham | 16 August 2017

    xxxxxOne lone man daring to interfere with the evil plans of the rich and powerful: it’s not exactly a new angle, but there are a few scraps of satisfaction to be found in Joel Hopkin’s latest film Hampstead – just not in the realm of originality. It’s a sleepy story that meanders along with a mildly pleasant mediocrity.

  • The high political stakes of same sex marriage

    33 Comments
    John Warhurst | 16 August 2017

    John CoatesThe same sex marriage postal plebiscite will be as intense as most referendum and election campaigns. Indeed, the special characteristics of this subject, advanced by the government as the reason for going beyond parliamentary means to resolve the issue, mean that the campaign may be more intense than most referendums have been.

  • What Philippines' president Duterte is telling us about China

    4 Comments
    Daniel Kleinsman | 16 August 2017

     

    xxxxxReckless machoism is the trademark of President Rodrigo Duterte. He has vowed to stop at nothing in his bloody war against drugs and dissidents, and is unapologetic about increasing casualities incurred. Meanwhile, he demonstrates a terrifying disregard for anyone who opposes his agenda, and he delights in doing so.

  • The rationality of Kim Jong Un

    11 Comments
    Justin Glyn | 15 August 2017

    xxxxxThe ongoing talk of war with North Korea and the threat of nuclear weapons has everybody dusting off their copies of Dr Strangelove and rewatching that classic black farce of innuendo, misunderstanding and paranoia in an age of Mutually Assured Destruction.


Featured Writers

  • Catherine Marshall

    Catherine Marshall headshot

    "For the traveller, these ever tighter-restrictions have already turned a commonplace activity into one riddled with fear and mistrust."
     read more

     

  • Fatima Measham

    Fatima Measham headshot

    "It is not a sordid rite of passage, a shadow cost of higher learning."
     read more

     

  • Greg Foyster

    Greg Foyster headshot

    "It's another example of how clean, green and efficient technologies still aren't accessible to everyone. This is a massive injustice in the making."
     read more

     

  • Kate Galloway

    Kate Galloway

    "Failing to adhere to these basic norms of good governance puts our system at risk."
     read more

     

  • Andrew Zammit on sensible ways to think about terrorism

    Podcast | 15 August 2017

    Chattersquare logo

    Is there a way to think about terrorism without politics? Do counter-terrorism responses make us safer? What are sensible ways to sift through news reports about acts of terror? Andrew Zammit takes us through these and other questions. He is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne and has worked on terrorism-related research projects at Monash University and Victoria University.

  • What's a little lie between friends?

    6 Comments
    Barry Gittins | 11 August 2017

    truth lie‘Would I lie to you? Would I lie to you honey? Now would I say something that wasn't true?’ The Eurythmics’ hit from 1985 has been played repeatedly in my head of late as I negotiate life as a Dad.

  • Massimo Faggioli on the dimensions of Catholic political culture

    2 Comments
    Podcast | 08 August 2017

    Chattersquare logo

    Dr Massimo Faggioli is a prominent Catholic historian and theology professor at Villanova University in Philadelphia. He shares insight into the conservative responses to Pope Francis, the papal shift toward a less abstract understanding of being Catholic, and the political binaries within the US Catholic Church. He also explains why Vatican II is not just unfinished business but an orientation and method for doing things.

  • ChatterSquare: Kate Galloway on lawyers in a tech-driven world

    Podcast | 01 August 2017

    Chattersquare logo

    What are the implications for the legal profession as blockchain technologies, smart contracts and apps shift our approach to matters of law? Where do lawyers fit into algorithm-driven decisions and digital access to information? Kate Galloway discusses how tech is disrupting the way we think about lawyering, and the ethical problems it poses. 

  • ChatterSquare: Greg Foyster on conservative arguments for climate action

    Podcast | 25 July 2017

    Chattersquare logoClimate change continues to be politically charged in Australia, even as other countries ramp up their renewable energy investments. It raises questions around salesmanship. Evidence and expertise seem to only be part of the argument for action – so how can we build momentum? Do conservatives in fact have a role? Greg Foyster walks us through the language and approaches that have fallen short, and the conservative arguments that could potentially lead to breakthroughs.


WEEK IN POLITICS



White is the new black

Fiona Katauskas

 


     This week's offering from Eureka Street's award winning political cartoonist.


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