Search Results: waste

If there are more than 100 matches, only the first 100 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Olympics silver whining

    • Various
    • 06 August 2012

    Our species believes it progresses without limitation. We shout when a swimmer wins silver, 'That's no inspiration'. As humans pound forward, no 'burden of care' limitation ... We deserve only winners, our species the sole inspiration.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    The Olympics and business world need to grow up

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 05 August 2012
    9 Comments

    The Olympic Games see many thousands of mainly young athletes from all around the world competing for a hundred or so medals. So the point of the exercise can't be to win. It is to lose. Or rather the Games are a school for learning how to lose and so grow in humanity.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Teen girl's post-traumatic guilt trip

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 20 June 2012
    2 Comments

    A self-absorbed teenager contributes to the road death of a pedestrian, then seeks to assuage her guilt without actually accepting responsibility. One teacher attemps to mentor the girl in her dilemma but is too accepting of her flirtatious advances to be considered a disinterested advisor.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Syria's massacre of innocence

    • Various
    • 18 June 2012

    The hands which pressed triggers, wielded knives at innocent throats, were once the gentle sons of others playing in sand pits, shadowed from scorching winds, while I ferried my own to schoolyard bunkers and safe horizons.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Vietnam mates' post-war suicides

    • Karl Cameron-Jackson
    • 11 June 2012
    9 Comments

    My dad and his RSL mates repeatedly told us 'Vietnam was a toy-boy war, only 501 died' as though numbers are a marker of grief. My tears often fall in an unremitting flood for eight mates who committed suicide soon after they arrived back home.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Getting personal with Anzac Day

    • Philip Harvey
    • 24 April 2012
    16 Comments

    Should I even be saying all this to people I have never met? What do I say? How far do I go? My paternal grandfather, Edgar, was not only an Anzac but among those who landed nearly 100 years ago at the Turkish cove. Even among my family his experiences are still largely passed over in silence.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Easter in detention

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 05 April 2012
    13 Comments

    Over many years I have celebrated Christmas and Easter in places where people are locked up — in refugee camps, prisons and detention centres. To be in these places at such times is hard. It is also a privilege.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Investment bankers and other monsters

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 21 March 2012
    1 Comment

    The action takes place in 2008 on the eve of the GFC, at an investment bank loosely modelled on Lehman Bros. The CEO is monstrous; a kind of sinewy bishop to capitalism, gaunt and vicious. Yet even the most principled characters are shown to compromise to varying degrees in the name of self-interest.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Prodigal son's shoeless stroll

    • Mark Austin
    • 19 March 2012
    2 Comments

    A drink from the sole is more refreshing than any bottled river. I felt the cushion of grass. It did not exclude, but wrapped its spines around me, tickled my dying ankles to rattle, greasing the bearings of my toes.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    When my kids believed in Santa and God

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 21 December 2011
    5 Comments

    My daughter, at seven, imagines a Barbie doll that does not exist, one that has 'a very cool gun and real lipstick'. My son, at five, asks for 'a Jeep, a hot air balloon and real false teeth'. These preserved Christmas lists record my children's growth more accurately than their physical measurements.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Giving ice-cream to strangers

    • Phoebe Marsh
    • 20 December 2011
    3 Comments

    I spied a boy in school uniform. 'These ice-creams are about to melt, would you like one?' He looked up from his phone, shook his head and grunted. I tried a woman nearby: 'They'll only go to waste!' 'No thank you.' I was the weirdo on the platform offering sweets to strangers. It was not a good look.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Tribute to the non-defeatist graffitists

    • Philip Harvey
    • 29 November 2011
    14 Comments

    I harbour a quiet pleasure at seeing dull square buildings of grey concrete slabs scintillatingly covered with outlandish swirls of colour. We know why they do it: to resist boredom, to challenge conformity, to strike out at a world that is not listening, to leave a mark when all other avenues are closed.

    READ MORE

We've updated our privacy policy.

Click to review