Search Results: cancer

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Brother of a suicide and war dead

    • Ian C. Smith
    • 12 July 2011
    1 Comment

    His mother quoted Shakespeare, preferred her husband to their children, placing her faith in him, gin, and ghosts ... When she turned up breast cancer's card she hugged her suffering to herself.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Sketching an icon of refugee resilience

    • Vacy Vlazna
    • 06 July 2011
    11 Comments

    I first saw Handala in a painting in the wretched Bourj al Barajneh Palestinian refugee camp in Beirut. In Palestine, Handala is loved and cherished as a symbol of steadfast resistance. But he transcends Palestine: he represents every suffering child.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    My refugee friend

    • Kerry Murphy
    • 08 June 2011
    9 Comments

    Tuc was an officer in the South Vietnamese army. After the war ended in 1975 he was interned by the North Vietnamese for many years, locked up in a hole in the ground. I asked him how he survived. He smiled and pointed to his picture of the Madonna.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Sydney's crazy car culture

    • Greg Foyster
    • 06 April 2011
    14 Comments

    Before being elected Premier, Barry O'Farrell described Sydney's new 200km bike network as 'crazy' and an 'inconvenience' to motorists. Given cycling's overwhelming benefits to society, what's really crazy is O'Farrell's populist pledge to keep Sydney car-dependent into the future. 

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    A tale of two funerals

    • Arnold Zable
    • 22 February 2011
    6 Comments

    SIEV X survivor Amal Basry died of cancer in 2006. By then she had received her permanent visa and was able to return to see her children, grandchildren and father in the Middle East one more time. When she returned, she expressed a wish to be buried in Australian soil.

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  • MEDIA

    Best of 2010: The dignity of Carl Williams

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 06 January 2011
    4 Comments

    When celebrities who have treated people violently suffer themselves from violence, their suffering is approved because it is an expected part of the plot. The death of Carl Williams has been covered as if it were an episode of Underbelly. Williams deserves better than this.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Vinnies' revolutionary president

    • John Falzon
    • 17 December 2010
    4 Comments

    Syd Tutton, national president of the St Vincent de Paul Society in Australia, died on Sunday. He was a fighter for social justice, uninterested in personal recognition, making light, for example, of the Papal Knighthood he received in 2009, threatening to ask the Vatican for a horse to go with the title.

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  • MEDIA

    Losing Mikayla

    • TIm Kroenert
    • 16 December 2010
    6 Comments

    The mainstream media dons a benevolent face. 3AW talkback radio, The Herald Sun, Channels Nine and 7 News carry Mikayla into Melbournians' homes. It's easy to be cynical about their motives. In an ideal world every sick child would be noticed in this way.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Thirty years of Jesuit Refugee Service

    • Mark Raper
    • 17 November 2010
    3 Comments

    May I tell you about one refugee whom I met during the 20 years I lived and worked JRS? The story has no happy outcome, indeed far from it. But it may help to communicate some of the feelings that inspire many who accompany the refugees.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Human stories of IVF

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 07 October 2010
    17 Comments

    In seeking to fill a mother's empty womb, Nobel Prize winning biologist Robert Edwards developed a solution. In so doing he confirmed what all innovators know: that progress doesn't occur in a neat and orderly vacuum, and nor should it be halted for fear of what it might produce.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Remembering the other 9/11

    • Antonio Castillo
    • 14 September 2010
    24 Comments

    At least those of us who survived Chile's 9/11 didn't have to stomach the phoney sombre Australian journalists 'live from New York' or the sight of a former Prime Minister crossing the Brooklyn bridge wearing an ACB tracksuit. But more than 30 years on, the Chilean people are still waiting for the United States' admission of guilt.

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  • RELIGION

    Father James Chesney and Ireland's religious war

    • Frank O'Shea
    • 31 August 2010
    7 Comments

    Throughout more than 30 years of killing and maiming in Northern Ireland, the media and governments maintained that the unrest was a political conflict. Though virtually everyone on one side was Catholic and those on the other were Protestant, nobody dared call it a religious war.

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