keywords: Afl

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Harris statue marks a turning point for AFLW

    • Erin Riley
    • 12 September 2019
    4 Comments

    It felt like a turning point. Female athletes and their supporters were saying no, we will not stand by while this happens. That sexual harassment has no place in our game. That female athletes should be able to do their jobs without abuse.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Women still fighting for territory in unequal AFL

    • Erin Riley
    • 19 August 2019

    The AFL's announcement that AFLX would be scrapped after two seasons, despite heavy media coverage, was a strong indication of the league's commitment to women's football. It now needs to follow up with commitments that reflect the increasing scale and importance of the women's competition to the league.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    AFL must take a serious stand against sexist sledging

    • Paul Mitchell
    • 18 May 2017
    7 Comments

    I was 16 and playing senior football for my local team the first time I doubted whether it was the sport for me. At training, the men's talk turned to the various ways they liked to 'take' their wives. They spoke as if the women in their lives were of a different species. I looked at my friend. We had girlfriends and had never spoken to each other about them in this way. That was in 1984. The abuse of Marc Murphy's wife in the Carlton vs St Kilda match last Saturday shows not much has changed.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    AFL women's league may threaten not boost diversity

    • Erin Riley
    • 05 September 2016
    4 Comments

    The lower wage for players in the AFL women's league has serious equity implications, beyond the clear discrepancy between men's and women's wages. In order to train three times a week, many players will be required to relocate closer to their clubs. This puts their day jobs in jeopardy, meaning only those who can afford to change jobs or take time off can afford to play. This has the potential to seriously skew the playing group towards those who are from higher socio-economic status.

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  • MEDIA

    Channel 7 needs to get with AFL's non-violence program

    • Garry Westmore
    • 02 May 2016
    4 Comments

    Arguably, as a society, Australia's tolerance for violence is waning, and both the AFL and the NRL have been proactive in diminishing the prevalence of deliberate and reckless violence that might endanger players' safety. Unfortunately, despite the AFL's desire to stamp out the more dangerous incidents, many televised football commentators are hindering the cause by making excuses for players, playing down the severity of their actions, and failing to condemn them.

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  • MEDIA

    'Jilted' Brownless saga shows AFL sexism still runs deep

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 17 March 2016
    7 Comments

    It's time someone called out this whole Billy Brownless/Garry Lyon saga for what it is. These former AFL footballers and sports media colleagues have fallen out over the past few months, over a reported affair between Lyon and Brownless' ex-wife, Nicky. This is not merely a salacious non-story. It is the nadir of a grubby grain of sports journalism that serves as the mouthpiece for an industry that has a long way to go before it leaves accusations of racism, homophobia and misogyny in its wake.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Second chances for AFL's Indigenous prodigal sons

    • Mike Bowden
    • 16 April 2014
    5 Comments

    Some think AFL football is like a trampoline catapulting young Indigenous footballers into a fairytale life. But the recent resignation of young Indigenous player Dayle Garlett reveals again that success depends on more than talent. The contrasting stories of Liam Jurrah and Xavier Clarke in Darwin offer a salient lesson to players like Garlett and Marley Williams, the young player of Maori descent recently convicted on assault charges.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Holy Feast of the AFL Grand Final

    • Michael McVeigh
    • 27 September 2013
    3 Comments

    The Feast of the Grand Final has a great deal in common with celebrations in other religious traditions. Events such as Christmas and Easter are celebrations of the stories that help fashion the identity of Christians. Telling these stories each year helps us create our own new stories about the values or beliefs we follow. The Grand Final has its own stories that tell us about ourselves, as well as rituals that personalise those stories for each of us.

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  • RELIGION

    AFL Demons hope last really will be first

    • Kylie Crabbe
    • 22 May 2008
    2 Comments

    The Melbourne Demons might have something to say about Jesus' claim 'the first will be last and the last will be first'. He wasn't talking about some new magic-bullet draft system, but a way of looking past social ladders to human equality.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Cousins story proves AFL is more than a game

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 08 November 2007
    2 Comments

    Ben Cousins is likely to be charged with bringing the game of AFL football into disrepute. But even though a broad group of people have an interest in football, how can their interest legitimately demand such a strong responsibility on the part of players and clubs that they can be penalised heavily if they fail to exercise it?

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Just do something about NT homelessness

    • Mike Bowden
    • 06 December 2019
    7 Comments

    The stats are chilling. The rate of homelessness in the Northern Territory is 12 times the national average. Six per cent of all Territorians are experiencing homelessness. More than 16 per cent of Territorians under 16 are homeless. Twenty per cent of Aboriginal people in the NT are homeless. It's time to do something.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Hypocrisy and hysteria over Chinese influence

    • Tim Robertson
    • 16 October 2019
    8 Comments

    Chinese interference in Australian politics is an issue of genuine concern. But why is the hysteria exclusive to China? Like the outrage surrounding the awarding of the 2012 Nobel Prize for Literature to Mo Yan, accused of working within the bounds of China's censorship program, why don't we hold our own government to the same level of scrutiny?

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