keywords: Ali Winters

  • RELIGION

    Atheist Pratchett's Discworld has lessons for Christians

    • Michael McVeigh
    • 16 March 2015
    4 Comments

    'You can't go around building a better world for people. Only people can build a better world. Otherwise it's just a cage.' When I heard English author Terry Pratchett had died, I immediately jumped online to start looking through some of my favourite quotes from his books. The above, from Witches Abroad, is one of many that have accompanied me over the years.   His 44 Discworld novels could be broadly described as comic fantasy, or fantasy satire, and yet that's really just the starting point for the immense variety of complicated ideas they explored in such a fun, joyous way. Perhaps strangely for someone whose work is so grounded in atheism, Pratchett has had a profound impact on my religious faith. Read more

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The enemy in my kitchen

    • Brian Matthews
    • 10 October 2014
    2 Comments

    I have always prided myself on my capacity to do some heavy labouring in my spare time, but a serious back injury put a stop to most of that. Michael doesn't mind though. I point at the pizza oven and its need for removal. 'Well, mate,' he says, 'it's dressed in black and it's totally masked and unidentifiable. It wouldn't be allowed into Parliament would it?'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Punk's holy fools still putting it to Putin

    • Barry Gittins and Jen Vuk
    • 11 April 2014

    Journalist Masha Gessen describes the members of Pussy Riot as 'Putin's ideal enemies'. In recent months, their nemesis has hosted the Olympics, taken control of Crimea and clamped down on media. For a group born out of 'the repressions of a corporate political system that directs its power against basic human rights', Pussy Riot still has much to roar about, even if its signature 'punk prayer' sounds more than ever like a plea.

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  • RELIGION

    Caravaggio's profane eye for the sacred

    • Luke Walladge
    • 22 July 2010
    6 Comments

    If Caravaggio hadn't been such a drunken, violent, criminal, he may never have been human enough, disturbed enough or repentant of enough sin to produce the most arresting, influential and remarkable sacred art in the history of the Christian West.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Learning how to die

    • Tony London
    • 20 April 2010
    3 Comments

    The old people in the mortuary silence of the doctor’s waiting room, rehearse the look, the patois, become familiar with the creeping symptoms, the medicines of resistance, the gentle small steps on the way.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    How Ted Kennedy changed the world

    • Michael Sean Winters
    • 28 August 2009
    1 Comment

    The final gift of Ted Kennedy to the nation was to pass the torch of liberalism to Barack Obama. It was breathtaking to see this Irish Catholic embrace a black man as his political heir.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    New Zealand's best export

    • Michael McVeigh
    • 19 December 2008
    2 Comments

    Life here leaves characters little time for introspection or philosophy. When politics finds its way into the strips, it's done in typically irreverent country style. Footrot Flats is one thing Australians could never steal from our nearby neighbours.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    A Gen X view of Obama as fiction

    • Bronwyn Lay
    • 06 November 2008
    6 Comments

    If you see some Generation X’s out there in the street, smiling like drunk cats, forgive them their madness - it’s been a long time coming. We are letting our inner lives blend with the polis. We know it might all be fiction but like fiction; it makes us feel less alone inside.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Historical novels

    • Delia Falconer
    • 06 July 2006

    Are we writing too many of them? Is there a crisis of relevance in Austlit? No, argues Delia Falconer.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Returning to place

    • Daniel Donahoo
    • 14 May 2006

    Daniel Donahoo examines the experiences of an expat in Peter Conrad’s Tales of Two Hemispheres.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The impossible dream lives on

    • Anthony Ham
    • 27 April 2006

    Spain is celebrating the 400th anniversary of its most famous novel, Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Quick reviews

    • Brooke Davis, Merrin Hughes, Kate Chester, Cassy Polimeni
    • 20 April 2006

    Reviews of the books The  Penelopiad;  Saving  Fish  from  Drowning;  No  Place  Like  Home;  and Breastwork:  Rethinking  Breastfeeding.

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