keywords: Idealism

  • AUSTRALIA

    APEC echoes in World Youth Day idealism

    • Tony Smith
    • 18 April 2008
    2 Comments

    In both the Olympic Games and the Catholic Church's World Youth Day, young people advance ideals that could benefit the world. It should not surprise if people committed to international understanding are also committed to universal human rights.

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  • RELIGION

    Now is the moment for political leadership

    • Frank Brennan
    • 06 February 2008
    8 Comments

    Even senior traditional hard men of the Liberal Party like Bill Heffernan and Shane Stone have indicated that it is time to act. It is time for Brendan Nelson to draw the line so that we can move on, committed to reconciliation and improvement in Aboriginal health, education, and life expectancy.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Idealists don't own cricket

    • Tony Smith
    • 20 January 2008
    2 Comments

    Cricket is a microcosm of society and the furore over sportsmanship reflects the division of Australia into two classes — the venal, whose ultimate measure of success is the potential for profit, and the naïve, who believe in higher values.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Russians voting against democracy

    • Ben Coleridge
    • 12 December 2007
    1 Comment

    Russia's apathetic young people assert that even if they vote, nothing will change. They don't actually want things to change. They compare Russia with the troubled Yeltsin years. The economy and lifestyle have boomed, so why worry about free speech?

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Further challenge to historical record on Aboriginal massacres

    • Tony Smith
    • 11 July 2007
    2 Comments

    A 19th century dispute over rights to whale on Victoria’s western coast saw a massacre of local Aboriginal people. The image of uniformed, white officers appearing in Aboriginal communities, supposedly to restore order and protect children, gives eerie timeliness to an uncompromising new account by Bruce Pascoe.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Knowing where the bodies are buried

    • Tony Smith
    • 27 June 2007

    But for its indubitable basis in reality, Shane Maloney's political thriller Sucked In would be fine therapy for those jaded Australians hoping to see an election year eruption of idealism in the affairs of state.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Book reviews

    • Jess Low, Sally Cloke, Rachel Hewitt, Lee Beasley
    • 18 May 2007

    Reviews of the books The Sparrow Garden; The Pyjama Girl Mystery; Stargazing: Memoirs of a young lighthouse keeper and Sacred Space, The prayer book 2005.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Saint Sophie of the German resistance movement

    • Michael Ashby
    • 07 August 2006

    For anybody who thinks that Germans were all willing or silent co-conspirators during the dreadful years of World War II, The Last Days of Sophie Scholl is a powerful and apparently accurate narrative of youthful martyrdom, a story that is redemptive for Germans.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Not another word

    • Jim Davidson
    • 10 July 2006

    Jim Davidson’s verdict on Don Watson’s Death Sentence: The Decay of Public Language.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    New tricks

    • Jack Waterford
    • 26 June 2006

    Labor’s leadership problems have been a dream for the Liberal Party, not least by obscuring the fact that the real victor in leadership games over recent months has been the prime minister, John Howard.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Book reviews

    • Miriam Bugden, Andrew Hamilton, Chris O’Connor, Tom Rigby
    • 26 June 2006

    Reviews of Western Horizon: Sydney’s heartland and the future of Australian politics; Body and Soul: A Spirituality of Imaginative Creativity; One Fourteenth of an Elephant: A memoir of life and death on the Burma–Thailand Railway; What’s Right? and Giving it Away: In praise of philanthropy.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Blair whiching

    • Brian Matthews
    • 19 June 2006

    Tony Blair was in trouble. Grey-faced, uncharacteristically faltering, he could only reiterate under siege in the press, on television and in parliament that the Weapons of Mass Destruction which had convinced him to take Britain to war really did exist and would be found.

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