• Policing the Crisis — Mugging, the State, and Law and Order, Stuart Hall et al.
    australia

    African gang beat-up plays us all for mugs

    • Celeste Liddle
    • 17 July 2018

    Through last week's Sunday Night report on Channel 7, we were treated to another round of fear mongering. Never mind that just last year police admitted that the so-called 'Apex Gang' did not exist. As an Aboriginal woman, I'm tired of being told by politicians and newspapers which other people of colour I'm supposed to scared of.

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  • Archbishop Julian Porteous
    religion

    Let's talk about the Catholic bishops

    • John Warhurst
    • 17 July 2018

    The constitutional position of bishops is best illustrated by the Wilson case. The media releases of the hierarchy revealed their impotence. They explained their inaction by pointing out that only the Pope could force a bishop to resign and were reduced to conveying the impression of working behind the scenes to influence Wilson's decision.

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  • Duterte
    religion

    Duterte vs God

    • Erin Cook
    • 13 July 2018
    3 Comments

    To mark two years as president of the Philippines, Duterte has taken on his biggest sparring partner yet. God now joins the likes of Barack Obama and the UN as targets in Duterte's ranting. It would be laughable if he hadn't spent his presidency turning the country into Revelations, where even priests are being gunned down in the streets.

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  • Australian shaped watering can nourishes global refugee resistance. Cartoon by Chris Johnston

    The global push against refugees

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 12 July 2018
    9 Comments

    Cometh the time, cometh the exploitable prejudice. With millions of globally displaced persons, states are retreating from the business of actually treating the condition as one of dysfunction inflicted by war, famine and poverty. It has morphed from a matter of humanitarianism to one of social ill and unease.

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  • xxxxx

    Lessons in compassion from Thai cave rescue

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 12 July 2018
    18 Comments

    Their resilience speaks of a strong Buddhist culture in which the boys were used to struggle, found meaning in attending to the welfare of others rather than their own, and drew strength from meditative practices that set their perilous predicament within a broader human horizon.

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  • The Geneva Refugee Convention was adopted on 28 July 1951 and opened for signature. ©UNHCR/UN Archives/ARNI

    Whatever happened to 'kindness to strangers'?

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 11 July 2018
    14 Comments

    It has become clear that the brutal Australian treatment of people who seek protection is part of an international punitive policy. This is sometimes attributed to a failure of political leadership. But it may reflect a deeper cultural change in the Western attitude to strangers, seen in migrant and refugee policy, penal policy, international relations and the scope of the rule of law.

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  • Illustration of Jack Cade

    The Complaint of the Poor Commons of Oz

    • Brian Matthews
    • 10 July 2018
    3 Comments

    The same sense of grievance and outrage that drove Jack and his rebels 500 years ago has sent Trump to the White House, propelled the United Kingdom out of the European Union, resurrected the poisonous 'Irish question' and legitimised Senator Pauline Hanson. She, with Cade-like empty bravado, claims to be for the 'battlers'.

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  • Uluru Statement From the Heart

    Aboriginal participation before recognition

    • Dani Larkin
    • 09 July 2018
    4 Comments

    We already know most Australians will support a referendum that would recognise Indigenous Australians within the constitution. What we now need is to examine how the constitutional reform procedures can themselves be reformed to support Indigenous political advancement. This includes reforming electoral laws and processes that limit Indigenous political participation.

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  • Executive with backwards E on his forehead takes the last Tim Tam from his colleagues. Cartoon by Chris Johnston

    Why powerful people behave badly

    • Conor Wynn
    • 06 July 2018
    12 Comments

    Pinning all the blame for poor behaviour on deliberate individual choice is a fundamental attribution error. We need to rise above the salacious gossip and the spectacle of corporate beheadings to understand what drives behaviour in powerful people, take a more reasoned approach and achieve sustainable change.

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  • Archbishop Philip Wilson

    The sentencing of Archbishop Wilson

    • Frank Brennan
    • 04 July 2018
    65 Comments

    Philip Wilson has been sentenced to 12 months' detention for concealing child sexual abuse. It's very likely that he will appeal his conviction and sentence. An appeal may well succeed, but that's not the end of the matter. This has been a six-year saga relating to events which occurred more than 40 years ago. Emotions are running high.

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  • Anthony Bourdain

    What religions really say about suicide

    • Rachel Woodlock
    • 15 June 2018
    13 Comments

    Amid the shock and grief for Anthony Bourdain's death, one blue-tick Twitterer attempted to capture five minutes of shameful fame, declaring that religious people believe hell or purgatory is his afterworld destination. While all the great religious traditions generally proscribe suicide, they also contain nuanced views of the suicide's fate.

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  • The 'Save the 8th' Rally held on 10 March 2018 in Dublin City Center, which drew around 100,000 protesters. Credit: Life Institute / Save the 8th

    Do pro-life Australians need a new approach?

    • Ann Deslandes
    • 04 June 2018
    56 Comments

    The result in Ireland is a timely reminder to political and/or church leaders in Australia who like to use Irish Catholic heritage as a way to defend their conservative views. On nearly all issues that have been debated by Australian Catholics against their religious obligations, the motherland is, clearly, no longer the source of moral legitimacy.

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  • Plastic bags

    Don't bag plastic bans

    • Fatima Measham
    • 05 July 2018
    10 Comments

    We can speculate on the reasons for the recent rage against plastic bag bans. We don't like change. We don't like being told what to do. We don't like having to think about alternatives and solutions. But at the heart of it, being mad about this particular inconvenience is about refusing to accept one's part in improving the collective lot. This is the one planet we have. There is no Plan B.

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  • Poinciana tree

    Us and them: reconceiving trees

    • Cristy Clark
    • 04 July 2018
    7 Comments

    Grieving the death of a tree seems a common experience, but I had rarely heard about it. We share stories of the loss of loved ones or pets, but not of specific trees. Are we less comfortable acknowledging the depth of this relationship? Does it challenge our cultural understanding of the natural world and our place within it?

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  • Chris Johnston cartoon contrasts a fat, bloated meat-eating world with a trim, lush and green 'vegan' world

    Will veganism save the planet?

    • Cristy Clark
    • 08 June 2018
    13 Comments

    Researchers from Oxford concluded that consumers have significant power to 'deliver environmental benefits on a scale not achievable by producers' by excluding animal products from their diets. Interestingly, this report comes at a time when the uptake of veganism is growing significantly, both globally and in Australia.

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  • Wave Rock

    Cycling rhythms of eternity

    • Deanne Davies
    • 16 July 2018
    1 Comment

    Movements of time — Farewell to ancient granite. Greetings to gleaming streams and striating ribbons of colour.

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  • The Permament Resident by Roanna Gonzalves

    Tales of the modern migrant

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 11 July 2018

    'In the Beginning Was the Word' opens with Angelina D'Costa, 'five years to the day after she stopped being a Catholic', entering a church, determined to confront a popular priest who is known to have covered up for another priest who abused children; only to be moved to submission by the familiar beauty of the Mass.

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  • patchwork blanket

    A snatch of memory

    • Elaine Barker
    • 09 July 2018

    She was in her eighties then. And I was thirteen. Now eighty, I've retrieved that memory of hers and hold it as I would my own.

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