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  • australia

    Lessons from our failure to build a constitutional bridge in the 2023 Referendum

    • Frank Brennan
    • 27 May 2024

    Following the failure of the Voice referendum, many believed that the path to constitutional recognition is closed for Indigenous Australians. But they may be wrong. 

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  • australia

    Budget balancing act fails working poor

    • David Halliday
    • 23 May 2024

    In light of the gains made in lifting people out of poverty during the pandemic, it seems critics are justified in viewing this year’s budget with more than a little disappointment. I wonder, when it comes to the federal budget, who are we trying to serve?

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  • religion

    Pope against the machine

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 23 May 2024

    When Pope Francis delivered a message for the World Day of Social Communications, he focused on AI. The pope posed a wide range of questions including how to regulate its development and use in order to avoid the manipulation of truth and the inevitable centralisation of wealth and power.

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  • australia

    The Punisher

    • Barry Gittins
    • 24 May 2024

    In the latest Quarterly Essay profile of Peter Dutton, author Lech Blaine may well describe his work as character delineation, rather than character assassination. But we seem to be at an impasse in Australian market of ideas, and scorn gives greater bang for the buck than dialogue.

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  • arts and culture

    The strange case of Australian noir

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 24 May 2024

    What's the appeal in Australian noir crime fiction? The genre has always been popular in Australia, and Australian writers of crime fiction have always had plenty of material to draw on. Led by authors like Garry Disher and Jane Harper, it has experienced something of a renaissance during the last decade.

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  • arts and culture

    Nursing our health carers

    • Michele Frankeni
    • 21 May 2024

    As someone who lately has been closer to witnessing the work of nurses and medical professionals than I’ve really wanted to be, I do not need persuading of their benefit to society. Perhaps every day should be ‘Hug a nurse day’. 

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  • Tangled up in Prussian Blue

    • Warwick McFadyen
    • 23 May 2024

    The reissuing of a record is not just news for the record, it’s also a reissuing of that part of the life of the listener who knew the original. Thus it is with Richard Clapton, his debut album Prussian Blue, and me.

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  • Realities

    • Paul Williamson
    • 16 May 2024

    Could a storm burst / because butterfly wings beat / a thousand miles away / to tip dominos of change / so the future emerges / like in the Chaos theory we use / to estimate future weather?

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  • What's the deal with Unfrosted?

    • David Halliday
    • 14 May 2024

    Jerry Seinfeld makes his directorial debut Unfrosted, a gleefully silly family comedy about the invention of the Pop-Tart. But the problem with this film is whether the sheer weight of comedic talent involved translates to actual laughs. Packed with countless cereal-based gags, it raises the question: Are disposable, pointless things worth anything?

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  • The two worlds of Eurovision

    • Michael McVeigh
    • 16 May 2024

    Millions around the world tune in for Eurovision each year, making it one of the world’s most-watched non-sporting events. It’s a mess of all that is funny, camp and bizarre. And yet instead of exploring the boundaries of our collective imagination, it's often overshadowed by regional politics and conflict. 

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  • Can Australian diplomacy temper Chinese bravado?

    • Jeremy Clarke
    • 13 May 2024

    The recent mid-air encounter between an Australian naval helicopter and a Chinese fighter jet over the Yellow Sea had the usual reactions, but ultimately failed to strain economic relations between the two states. 

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  • An indelicate balance: Israel and Iran exchange blows

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 01 May 2024

    For decades, the major powers of Israel, Iran and Saudi Arabia have kept a restraint on their hostile engagements, with preference given to battle waged via proxies. A recent Israeli air strike on Iranian offices in Syria and Iran's subsequent attack on Israel with 185 drones, 110 ballistic missiles and 36 cruise missiles suggested that calculated restraint had been finally abandoned.

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  • Simple fixes not enough to protect domestic violence victims

    • Ulrike Marwitz
    • 20 May 2024

    Domestic violence is not a simple or straightforward issue, and we know that not all cases have the same dynamics or the same causes. Rather than applying one size fits all responses, we need to begin with addressing the diverse underlying causes. 

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  • Under pressure from High Court and Dutton, government rushes immigration bill

    • Frank Brennan
    • 13 May 2024

    The Albanese government’s refugee and asylum policy is in a mess. When Minister Giles introduced his Migration Amendment Bill, they bypassed typical parliamentary procedures, wanting to be seen as tougher than Peter Dutton in getting unvisaed non-citizens out of the country. It’s time for the government to return to due process in this whole field. 

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  • Advocating against the wind

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 08 May 2024

    With the Queensland Government changing the Youth Justice Act, detention of children will no longer be seen as a last resort, causing widespread dismay among youth justice advocates. It invites reflection on what we should expect when we advocate for a cause, ranging from climate change to perceived injustice, and how we should evaluate our efforts.

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  • How Jung turned grief into a philosophy of life

    • Barry Gittins
    • 21 May 2024

    When friends faced a heartbreaking loss, they found solace in Carl Jung's writings, granting them permission to grieve and hope. Given his life of contradictions, how should we evaluate Jung's contributions and his complex relationship with religious faith?

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  • Can today’s church overcome division?

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 16 May 2024

    The Week of Christian Unity encourages the healing of divisions between churches, and is intended to restore unity among Christians. However, we should wonder at how realistic that vision is in a society where division provides most of the news of the day.

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  • The Greens, the Church and freedom of religion

    • John Warhurst
    • 01 May 2024

    The relationship between the Catholic church and the Greens has been one marked by near constant antagonism. Are there any consequences from this for either the church or the party?

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