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  • Donald Trump at the White House in March 2019 (Photo by Michael Reynolds - Pool/Getty Images)
    international

    Policy, not paranoia, is the antidote to Trump

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 26 March 2019

    The Mueller investigation was meant to be the confirmation of every parochial instance of anti-Trumpism. The mechanism was the supposed Russian connection. It provided a perfect distraction on domestic politics, taking attention away from debates on refugees and borders and discussions on poverty and social reform.

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  • President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (Getty Images)
    international

    Hypocrisy in Australian-Turkish chest puffing

    • Justin Glyn
    • 25 March 2019
    5 Comments

    The stoush between Erdogan (who said New Zealanders and Australians visiting Turkey would leave it 'in coffins ') and Morrison (all options to erase this insult were 'on the table') amounts to less than meets the eye. But it speaks volumes about what a toxic brew hypocrisy and the prospect of a forthcoming election can produce.

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  • Television studio (simonkr / Getty Creative)
    media

    Journalism and ethics after Christchurch

    • Francine Crimmins
    • 22 March 2019
    5 Comments

    The difficulty for journalists reporting emergencies is they're having to make important and hugely impactful ethical decisions right in the moment. In balancing those tough decisions, how often does the common good start drowning in what will draw the most attention from an audience, and away from competing news organisations?

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  • Aerial view of the Amazon Rainforest, near Manaus, the capital of the Brazilian state of Amazonas. Photo by Neil Palmer (CIAT) via Flickr

    Land rights and climate change in Chile, Brazil

    • Ramona Wadi
    • 19 March 2019
    2 Comments

    As climate change continues to take centre stage, stepping away from the drivel spouted by leaders and instead highlighting the legitimacy of anti-colonial struggle as the foundation from which to combat all forms of detrimental land exploitation is not just preferable. It is an obligation.

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  • The National Capitol Building in Havana (photo by Antonio Castillo)

    Cuba's constitutional reforms bring hope

    • Antonio Castillo
    • 15 March 2019
    6 Comments

    Cuba's constitutional referendum in February displayed overwhelming support for the government. More than six million voted yes, while around 706,000 voted no. The new constitution represents a step forward for the democratic, economic and social development of the country.

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  • Adil Ahmed Dar

    Ending the cycle of violence in Kashmir

    • Tim Robertson
    • 15 March 2019
    1 Comment

    The world leaders who rushed to condemn the Valentine's Day attack have long remained silent on state-sanctioned oppression in Kashmir. That's no longer a surprise; nor is the fact that the attack was covered by every major western media organisation, while the daily injustices perpetrated against ordinary Kashmiris go unreported.

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  • Michelle and Stevie Payne in 2014 (Photo by Vince Caligiuri/Getty Images)

    The gifts of poetry and Down syndrome

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 26 March 2019

    To devote the same day to reflection on both Down syndrome and on poetry, though probably unintended, was a very human thing to do. Precisely because one is so commonly regarded as a defect and the other as an idle activity, we need to be reminded that both are a gift.

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  • Lungs diagram

    Opt-out not the answer for organ donation

    • Sandi Parsons
    • 21 March 2019
    3 Comments

    The key deciding factor for both opt-in and opt-out systems requires that next-of-kin provide consent. Without this consent, organ donation will not proceed under either an opt-in or opt-out model. As such, education and awareness, and an understanding of organ donation as a gift, is the best way to raise organ donation rates.

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  • Hand caked with slime

    'Virtue signalling' and other slimy words

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 20 March 2019
    15 Comments

    The slimy words are those that convict their targets of simulating virtue. They include the old favourite 'bleeding hearts', the perennial 'political correctness' and the most recently minted 'virtue signalling'. They are slimy because they purport to be counters in rational argument but dismiss opposed arguments without engaging with them.

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  • Yarralumla mosque

    Yarralumla Mosque, the day after Christchurch

    • Daniel Sleiman
    • 18 March 2019
    3 Comments

    A lady with tears in her eyes asked if I was Muslim. I told her that I am. She asked it if would it be okay if she came in and said a prayer. 'Of course,' I replied. She knelt, quietly sobbing, and said a few words. I also knelt and recited a few verses from the Quran. We were complete strangers sharing a unique and emotional moment.

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  • George Pell arrives at Melbourne County Court on 27 February 27 2019. (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

    Australian Catholics take stock as Pell falls

    • John Warhurst
    • 06 March 2019
    40 Comments

    A conservative within a conservative church he was a divisive figure, not just because of his orthodox views but because of the unbending and assertive style with which he promulgated them. Something died in Australian Catholicism with this verdict and Australian Catholics will have to live with that whatever the future turns out to be.

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  • The Vatican

    Can the Church survive its terminal self harm?

    • Stephanie Dowrick
    • 06 March 2019
    84 Comments

    My relationship to Catholicism can be summed up as: I am on the outskirts, yet close and invested enough to care how the Church evolves. Because, it seems to me, how it evolves and the speed at which those urgent and essential changes take place will significantly determine whether it will survive — and whether it deserves to survive.

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  • Hobart school students strike for climate action in 2018 (Laura Campbell via Flickr)

    Children speak truth to climate inaction

    • Cristy Clark
    • 13 March 2019
    21 Comments

    My children will be walking out of school for the School Strike 4 Climate Action. My eldest says she wants 'to protest that adults should actually do something about this planet that is dying, because we're all going to die with it'. She sees climate change action as a black and white issue.

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  • Some of the fish found dead near Broken Hill

    The great Murray-Darling swindle

    • Greg Foyster
    • 01 March 2019
    10 Comments

    A million dead fish, floating on putrid green water. Images of this ecological catastrophe on the Darling River over summer shocked the nation. Was it the result of drought? Blue-green algae poisoning? After at least four published reports, we know the answers. It's time to state plainly what has been going on, and who is to blame.

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  • A recent photo taken on a site visit to the Gloucester mine.

    Is the legal tide turning on climate change?

    • Cristy Clark
    • 14 February 2019
    7 Comments

    While in many ways this decision was uncontroversial — in that it merely upheld an earlier ministerial decision — Chief Justice Preston's judgment was significant in the Australian context both for its extensive reference to climate change and for his honour's clear acceptance of the science.

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  • Pall bearers carry coffin

    The wake

    • Wally Swist
    • 25 March 2019
    3 Comments

    A child approaches the casket, reaches within to try to lift my folded hands, to make sure, as she tells her mother later, that I am not just sleeping.

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  • J. K. Rowling attends the UK Premiere of Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes Of Grindelwald at Cineworld Leicester Square on 13 November 2018 in London, England. (Photo by John Phillips/Getty Images)

    J. K. needs to stop Harry Potter queerbaiting

    • Neve Mahoney
    • 21 March 2019
    11 Comments

    Rowling still wants it both ways — the kudos for representation that she never explicitly included, with the benefit of no actual risk. Back then, having an openly gay character would have been taking a stand. But now, in 2019, a straight author winking at queerness is just not good enough.

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  • Empty hospital bed lit by sunlight (Roberto Pangiarella / EyeEm)

    Your last day

    • Maureen O'Brien
    • 20 March 2019
    12 Comments

    On the morning of your last day there are eight people, including me and my daughter, who is a music therapist and has played music for people as they die as part of her clinical practice. After discussions during the week, first with you and then with your neurologist, it was decided that she will sing for you and the people with you today.

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