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Section: Arts And Culture

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Sixty-five South

    • Geoff Page
    • 09 May 2024

    Today we leave Antarctic proper; /we’ve seen the penguins and the whales, /the icebergs in their convolutions /and thought about the Age of Sail /whose heroes nosed around down here /sniffing out a sort of fame. /Or was it just the golden oil  /that burned with such a lambent flame?

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Courtship rivalry

    • Eddie Hampson
    • 08 May 2024

    What at first appears to be a light-hearted romantic comedy glosses over the dark intensity of Challengers. The tangled and obsessive nature of the relationships within a love triangle mirrors the sport at the centre of Luca Guadagnino's latest. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Here we are now, entertain us

    • Barry Gittins
    • 01 May 2024

    The raw power of ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ blasted Nirvana past the mainstream and into the realm of music immortality. So what was it about Cobain’s music that resonated with young people in the early 90s and continues to find vast audiences 30 years later?

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Vanity and grace in the return of Priscilla

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 29 April 2024

    What are we to make of the enthusiasm that led to the discovery of the bus once used in The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert and the plan to restore it for a remake, thirty years later? 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Courting: An intimate history of love and the law

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 19 April 2024
    1 Comment

    Love is a creature of its time, and so ideas, attitudes and conduct of affairs of the heart change and evolve as time passes. Courting explores breach of promise cases in Australia from 1788 until the 1970s, and in doing do, documents the development of Australian society from a penal colony to a free and much more individualistic one.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Freud's last session

    • Neil Jeyasingam
    • 18 April 2024
    2 Comments

    Freud’s Last Session pits the famous psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud against Christian apologist and author C.S. Lewis, a powerful concept, given the sheer cultural heft of the two historical figures. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Escaping expectations

    • Michele Frankeni
    • 15 April 2024

    What is so desirable about erasing our experiences from our faces? After all, they’re not called character lines for nothing. Shaw may have said youth is wasted on the young, but really youth is wasted on the aged.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Between sense and sensation

    • Nathan Scolaro
    • 11 April 2024
    2 Comments

    Can a chatbot write a poem? The answer reveals something about the heart of human interaction. True connection, like true poetry, requires discomfort, vulnerability and a richness of experience that defies the simplicity of algorithms.  

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The Dinner Guest

    • Damian Balassone
    • 09 April 2024
    4 Comments

    The rhetoric of elites / sets off his built-in shit detector. He much prefers to eat / with hookers, drunks and tax collectors.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Nam Le's 36 Ways of Writing a Vietnamese Poem

    • Peter Craven
    • 05 April 2024
    1 Comment

    Nam Le is one of the strangest writers in the history of Australian literature and is also one of the most incandescently brilliant — which is very weird if you bear in mind that his primary claim to legendary status is a book of short fiction published in 2008. With 36 Ways of Writing a Vietnamese Poem, Le returns with a new work that encapsulates the brilliance and complexity that fans and critics have come to expect.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Sins of the fathers

    • Ken Haley
    • 29 March 2024
    2 Comments

    Recent years have made clerical child sexual abuse a badge of shame within Australia’s Catholic hierarchy, and rightly so. But Anne Manne’s new book, Sins of the fathers, will give pause to those who blame these offences on the rule of hieratic celibacy.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Easterwards

    • John Kelly
    • 28 March 2024

    Dante and Hopkins named it lavishly: Christ’s vita nuova, shared to Easter in us;  Ignatius of Loyola called it: magnanimity . . . How could we then, receiving,  hoard or dispense it stintingly, like Scrooge before his Christmas haunting?

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