Section: Australia

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • AUSTRALIA

    Musharraf throws dice in bid to hold power

    • Suzanna Koster
    • 11 July 2007

    This week's operation against the radical clerics has prompted messages of support for Pakistan's General Musharraf from western allies. But in the eyes of the common Pakistanis the president has lost credibility forever.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    JI's Al Qaeda link a myth

    • Dewi Anggraeni
    • 11 July 2007

    There may be ideological sympathy on the part of Indonesia's Jemaah Islamiyah for Al Qaeda, but there has been no direct affiliation between between the two groups since 2003. Al Qaeda, it seems, has dismissed JI as ineffectual—they keep getting caught.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    East Timor's continued uphill battle to secure a future

    • Paul Cleary
    • 11 July 2007
    3 Comments

    A potentially unstable coalition government with few detailed policies and weak administrative ability is now certain to emerge following the fragmented result in the recent election. But grounds for hope remain.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Tariq Ali's Latin American "axis of hope"

    • Rodrigo Acuña
    • 11 July 2007

    Since 1998, the Bolivarian revolution in Venezuela has brought Hugo Chávez to world attention as a major challenge to American foreign policy in the region. Novelist and historian Tariq Ali sees a lot of positives, such as the Banco del Sur (Bank of the South) joint venture that involves six Latin American countries.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Brendan Keilar points the way to a better world

    • Michael Mullins
    • 27 June 2007

    See Judge Act forms the template of a strand of Catholic social activism. Brendan Keilar, the Melbourne good Samaritan who was fatally shot this month, did exactly this, in very fast motion.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Boots on the ground cannot replace faces in a community

    • Jack Waterford
    • 27 June 2007
    5 Comments

    Three decades ago, a task force was commissioned by the Commonwealth to tackle a national disaster among Aborigines. Today's is much more problematic, with cops, then with army officers, then some doctors not yet consulted or organised, and no sense of engagement with the service providers on the ground, let alone the objects of the attention.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Ben Cousins not alone in the wasteland of addiction

    • Barbara Chapman
    • 27 June 2007

    "John" shares the same city and roughly the same age as Ben Cousins. Uneducated and unsupported, he successfully fought his drug addiction with inner resolve, but eventually alcohol caused him more grief than the 'hard stuff’.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Who has the fairest IR policy?

    • Keith Harvey
    • 27 June 2007
    2 Comments

    The Government’s "fairness" Bill provided that new agreements should compensate employees for loss of particular award conditions. Since individual agreements remain the cornerstone of the Government’s laws, the fundamental right of employees to bargain collectively and be represented by their union remains absent.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    No place for truth in citizenship training school?

    • Erasmus
    • 13 June 2007
    4 Comments

    It’s an ordinary day at the Citizenship Traditional School. Citizenship questions are about Australian values – fair go, mateship, correct use of English, etc. Take the questions home and memorise the right answers.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Rabbit proof fence not Jigalong's only barrier

    • Jack Waterford
    • 13 June 2007
    2 Comments

    Jigalong is a remote community in WA, best known for its association with the Rabbit Proof Fence. Remote Aboriginal communities suffer greatly from undeveloped nature of their economies, and the institutional barriers created to prevent them developing.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    'History wars' propel local yarns into big picture

    • Susan Aykut
    • 13 June 2007

    Organisations that commission the writing of their history know that they must speak to their own people. But they should also engage with big picture debates that put people's stories into a larger context.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Why is it so hard to say sorry?

    • Ursula Stephens
    • 13 June 2007
    16 Comments

    This year's anniversaries are reminders of the importance of "sorry" in the reconciliation process. Why is it so hard to admit that most human of qualities, fallibility? Regret, atonement and forgiveness lie very much at the core of spiritual values.

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