Welcome to Eureka Street

back to site

Keywords: Adaptation

  • AUSTRALIA

    The changing self

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 20 March 2024

    Times are changed and we are changed with them. As societal norms evolve, from fashion to expressions of freedom and political attitudes, how does each of us adapt while preserving our core selves? 

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Re-building the commons: In conversation with Joshua Lourensz

    • Michael McVeigh
    • 06 February 2024

    In a world that has become increasingly more divided in the aftermath of the pandemic, Executive Director of Catholic Social Services Victoria Joshua Lourensz is questioning how we might best re-develop a sense of the commons to reignite our communities and foster social responsibility?

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Best of 2023: The heat will kill you first

    • David Halliday
    • 11 January 2024

    How will a warming planet impact us? In conversation with Eureka Street, longtime climate journalist and contributing editor for Rolling Stone Jeff Goodell discusses two decades of covering climate change, examining the effects a superheated world, and how humanity will need to adapt. 

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A Christmas Carol and the making of a miser

    • David Halliday
    • 30 November 2023
    2 Comments

    Why another Christmas Carol and why now? This version takes a detour from Dickens’ original delving deeper into Scrooge’s past, painting him not just as a villain, but as a victim of circumstances. It suggests that behind every act we hastily label as ‘cruel’ lies a story of fear and anxiety, and a flesh-and-blood human being. And forgiveness, then, becomes an acknowledgment of our shared human frailty.

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    The heat will kill you first: In conversation with Jeff Goodell

    • David Halliday
    • 11 August 2023

    How will a warming planet impact us? In conversation with Eureka Street, longtime climate journalist and contributing editor for Rolling Stone Jeff Goodell discusses two decades of covering climate change, examining the effects a superheated world, and how humanity will need to adapt. 

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The disquieting lessons of Ian McEwan

    • Peter Craven
    • 14 June 2023

    Ian McEwan's Lessons marked a sharp twist in a five-decade literary career, and presents an opportunity to reflect on his expansive body of work. The one-time literary rogue and Booker laureate now stands as the unquestioned doyen of modern English fiction, his audacious work perpetually navigating undercurrents of unease.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The book corner: The Jane Austen Remedy

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 10 March 2023
    1 Comment

    It's a truth universally acknowledged that a book can change a life, but can certain books help a reader live more fully at any age? Ruth Wilson, a 90-year-old author, thinks so. Her book, The Jane Austen Remedy, explores the belief that books can cure an ailing soul. 

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Storm brewing over Pacific nations as climate and debt crises collide

    • Cardinal Soane Patita Paini Mafi
    • 06 March 2023
    4 Comments

    Increasingly frequent and severe weather events are leaving Pacific Island nations struggling to rebuild. The region needs nearly US $1 billion per year in financing to adapt to climate change but with lengthy delays and complex grant applications, accessing funds is a challenge.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    When Robodebt came knocking was anyone home?

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 23 February 2023
    8 Comments

    The Robodebt Scheme's Royal Commission revealed ethical insensitivity and a disregard for the rule of law by administrators. Suicides of vulnerable people were ignored in the quest for revenue, which may indicate a more extensive corruption of government and administration.

    READ MORE
  • INTERNATIONAL

    Born to rule and crowned in prison

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 14 July 2022
    1 Comment

    The leaders of the past are often referred to as a measuring stick for evaluating the present. Australian prime ministers are routinely compared to John Curtin or Robert Menzies. This coming week calls to mind another leader against whom we might measure others. July 18 marks Mandela Day, an annual international day in honour of  Nelson Mandela, the first Black President of South Africa. Mandela had the quality, rare today, of being born to rule.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Memory and Austen

    • Juliette Hughes 
    • 14 July 2022
    1 Comment

    History is on my mind at the moment, all because of yet another awful Austen adaptation. The latest cinematic mud-pie thrown at her in the new Persuasion movie may even be the worst one yet, which is something, because there’s a lot of competition. Who can forget Gwyneth Paltrow in the 1995 Emma driving a carriage in a yellow ball gown as though she were doing the time trial in Top Gear?

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Best of 2021: Not just climate adaptation, but genuine transformation

    • Cristy Clark
    • 11 January 2022
    1 Comment

    On a superficial level, it makes no sense to commit so strongly to managing the impacts of climate change (adaptation) on the one hand while refusing to significantly reduce emissions (mitigation) on the other. On the other hand, when you start to unpack the logic of so much adaptation policy, this contradiction fades away.

    READ MORE