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Keywords: Money

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • AUSTRALIA

    Australia's dysfunctional housing quagmire

    • Peter Mares
    • 12 April 2024

    The ABC’s recent Q+A housing special left many questions unasked and unanswered. Labor, Coalition and Green MPs all say they want more people to be able to buy their own homes. The most obvious way to achieve that would be to reduce the price of housing. Yet no politician will make that an explicit policy aim.

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  • ECONOMICS

    Where does nuclear fit in Australia's zero-carbon future?

    • David James
    • 04 April 2024

    Big changes are occurring in the financial sector that suggest the climate change agenda is starting to lose crucial support with the world’s largest fund managers. As support for ESG goals wane, the conversation is shifting to nuclear energy. But does it make any financial sense? 

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Will AUKUS lead Australia down the nuclear path?

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 04 April 2024

    Nuclear energy has snuck its way onto the table of Australian public policy. Given that Australia is a country that hosts military nuclear platforms, the impetus to translate it into a civilian context is proving powerful.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Americans look after each other because their government won't

    • Sarah Klenbort
    • 03 April 2024

    Americans, facing high healthcare costs, frequently resort to crowdfunding for essential treatments, highlighting a reliance on volunteerism to fill government gaps. Meanwhile, Australians, benefiting from a higher tax-funded safety net, donate less to charity. So how do differing approaches to social welfare influence the spirit of community and generosity?

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  • RELIGION

    Flowers for Father Rahner

    • John Honner
    • 02 April 2024

    Karl Rahner, a Jesuit priest whose ideas helped modernize the Church, left an indelible legacy on contemporary Catholicism. On the 40th anniversary of his death, what can a flower left at his niche tell us about the lasting bonds between belief, memory, and the enduring search for human connection?

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  • ECONOMICS

    Review: The Shortest History of Economics

    • David James
    • 22 March 2024

    Economics may be useless for forecasting, and its assertions can be overly simplistic. But it is a language that should be understood, and here is a good place to start. In simple and clear prose, Leigh spans the history of human economic activity, beginning in prehistoric times and ending with the modern day.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    We must work so that all can rest

    • Andreana Reale
    • 18 March 2024

    In today's 24/7 Grind Culture, rest has become rare. Rebuilding a healthy culture of rest will involve supporting workers with decent wages, campaigning against companies that exploit employees, and investigating supply chains that use slavery and exploited labour to produce their products. 

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Setting a higher price on democracy

    • Michael McVeigh
    • 18 March 2024

    The Federal Government looks set to bring in legislation which would make it more difficult for new candidates to put themselves forward in future elections. In a nation where more than a third of voters opted not to vote for one of the two major parties, this should concern everyone.

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  • ECONOMICS

    The economy is in worse shape than you think

    • David James
    • 07 March 2024
    1 Comment

    The aggregate picture of the economy may seem healthy enough after two years of heavy immigration, over 800,000, and the return of students and tourists. But the elephant in the room remains. Australia is a two-tiered society sharply divided between people who own homes and people who do not. The generational divide is worsening.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Charity begins at the microphone

    • Barry Divola
    • 06 March 2024

    A documentary about the making of 1985’s We Are The World holds many surprises, while raising questions about charity singles. These stars were rich and privileged and largely out of touch with how most of the public lived. But at least they were using their fame for something good, and wasn’t that something to be encouraged?

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Why the choice revolution let us down: In conversation with Mark Considine

    • David Halliday
    • 28 February 2024

    The main purpose of government is to promote the welfare of its people. And yet over the last few decades, through numerous inquiries, it’s become clear that the Australian government has failed to provide services for the Australian population as well as might be expected. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Why we keep coming back to Groundhog Day

    • Paul Mitchell
    • 22 February 2024
    1 Comment

    Since its release, audiences, critics and philosophers have grappled with Groundhog Day’s take on time and eternity. Like all great art, Groundhog Day resists easy categorisation and is a story that, in a wonderful irony, we can go to again and again.

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