Welcome to Eureka Street

back to site

Keywords: Montaigne

  • INTERNATIONAL

    Boris, Brexit and taking it up to political bull

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 03 June 2019
    2 Comments

    An enduring memory of the 2016 Brexit campaign was the claim by pro-leavers that the EU was extracting some £350 million a week. The claim, ignoring EU subsidies, returns and contributions to Britain, was so outrageously proud and inaccurate, it stuck. Which leads us to a novel citizen's experiment on the issue of lying in politics.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Learning how to die with chimera Montaigne

    • Patti Miller
    • 14 October 2015
    13 Comments

    I have always felt guilty about an inability to commit to any belief system. So when Montaigne said 'Only fools have made up their mind', I felt an enormous sense of relief. He knew that those who are certain are the ones to shut down newspapers, lop off heads, blow up planes, burn books. There is a thread throughout his essays, too, of him finding sex undignified and therefore unfitting for grown men and women. It is one of his many contradictions and confronts me with my own contradictory attitude.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Election year food, sex and meaning

    • Barry Gittins and Jen Vuk
    • 08 February 2013

    David Marr's withering piece on Tony Abbot completes the political trinity. These writers manage the impossible: they have me feeling sorry for politicians. Well, almost. I'm not sure if such magnanimity is allowed in an election year. But what a pleasure to discover those grey Canberran corridors harbouring such a chiaroscuro of emotion.

    READ MORE
  • MARGARET DOOLEY AWARD

    The ethics of getting a job

    • Patrick McCabe
    • 27 July 2011
    11 Comments

    Ignatius of Loyola and Michel de Montaigne both had privileged upbringings. But where Montaigne was committed to personal fulfillment, Loyala was devoted to service. I, too, had a privileged upbrining and education. I'm not yet sure whose example is best to follow. 

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    'Best' essays merit book title's reckless superlative

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 13 December 2007

    The recurrence of the ‘big' issues of politics, religion, and sexuality in Best Australian Essays 2007 is predictable enough. But the essays become more interesting when we see particular trends, such as surveillance and the individual's right to privacy, emerge in each.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Models for a good life and an honest death

    • Clive O'Connell
    • 16 October 2006

    Historian Inga Clendinnen's reviews, childhood recollections, multi-coloured reminiscences of her working career, and informed discourse on simple events or complex ideas, are collected in a way that reveals a tempered tolerance seemingly inherited from her favourite essayist, Montaigne.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The human as such

    • Peter Steele
    • 08 July 2006

    Peter Steele reviews Terry Eagleton’s Sweet Violence: the Idea of the Tragic.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Language so lovely

    • Chris Wallace-Crabbe
    • 18 June 2006

    Chris Wallace-Crabbe on After Shakespeare: An Anthology and The Oxford Book of Aphorisms, both edited by John Gross.

    READ MORE
  • MEDIA

    The doyen of dissent

    • Robert Hefner
    • 25 April 2006

    Robert Hefner meets the outspoken editor of Harper’s Magazine, Lewis H. Lapham.

    READ MORE