keywords: Baby Doc

  • EUREKA STREET/ READER'S FEAST AWARD

    Migrant myths and memories

    • Julie McNeill
    • 24 August 2011
    4 Comments

    Sociologist Eva Cox heard all the vitriol about boat people when, as a five-year-old Jewish girl, she fled Nazi Germany and headed to Australia. My nine-year-old mother was a different kind of boat arrival: one of 135,000 'child migrants' imported under the 'Populate or Perish' policy.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hating hipsters and bogans

    • Ellena Savage
    • 04 March 2011
    14 Comments

    We wear op-shop outfits, read classics, watch Q&A and sip lattes. There are puerile vanities here, but who doesn't entertain such vanities? Bogans, of course. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Stable bleatings

    • Various
    • 21 December 2010
    2 Comments

    Look at her, at the child cradled across her arm, replete in milky sleep, perfectly composed; At how her fingers fuss over his perfumed skin, The cool heal of her palm. 

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Burmese refugees' Christmas story

    • Duncan MacLaren
    • 13 December 2010
    3 Comments

    Outside: the fish factory that never sleeps. The people working in it are illegal migrants, paid a pittance and treated as sub humans. Only the strong return from the fishing trips. If you are ill and cannot work, you can be tipped into the sea along with the other rubbish for the seagulls.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Tony Windsor's Murray-Darling prescience

    • Tony Kevin
    • 19 October 2010
    7 Comments

    Irrigated agriculture systems, like electric grids and city roads, trigger a government's duty of care to the human communities that they sustain. Particularly when they were built with the blood, sweat and tears that went into building our Murray-Darling Basin irrigation communities.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Human stories of IVF

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 07 October 2010
    17 Comments

    In seeking to fill a mother's empty womb, Nobel Prize winning biologist Robert Edwards developed a solution. In so doing he confirmed what all innovators know: that progress doesn't occur in a neat and orderly vacuum, and nor should it be halted for fear of what it might produce.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Choosing the sex of your child

    • Kevin McGovern
    • 08 April 2010
    3 Comments

    The media has reported that Australia's ban on couples using IVF to choose the sex of their children might soon be lifted. Some of the supporters of sex selection for non-medical reasons are fertility doctors for whom there is a considerable financial incentive.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    The Western origins of Hati's 'curse'

    • Adele Webb
    • 04 March 2010
    3 Comments

    The story of Haiti, even from the earliest decades of its independence, is one of a downward spiral into debt and underdevelopment. It has been at the short end of the stick, time and time again, in its relationships with richer and powerful countries. Haiti, it turns out, never stood a chance.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Haiti needs to be free

    • Aurelien Mondon
    • 05 February 2010
    7 Comments

    The Haitians need help, but are not a failed people. Two hundred years ago, Haiti became a beacon of light and freedom for all oppressed people. Colonialism was defeated, and the myth of white supremacy dealt a mortal blow. For this, the little country would pay.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Irish radical Jesuit's life down under

    • Val Noone
    • 04 September 2009
    7 Comments

    At the height of Willam Hackett's republican involvements, the Jesuit provincial offered him a choice of silence or appointment to Australia. Through a combination of personal memoir and public history, Brenda Niall unravels the riddles of Hackett's life.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    How Rafters had its pro-choice cake and ate it too

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 09 July 2009
    5 Comments

    When Julie learned she was pregnant, Dave advocated termination. Julie could see his logic, but was also overcome by powerful mothering urges. The writers of Packed to the Rafters are adept at unpacking every skerrick of emotional baggage.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Outsourcing care

    • Michael Mullins
    • 23 March 2009
    5 Comments

    The Victorian bushfires forced people to think about the costs and values associated with living in the bush. The financial meltdown will in turn make us consider our care for the needy, and how, and indeed whether, we must pay for it.

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