keywords: Covering Climate Now

  • AUSTRALIA

    Diagnosing the great Australian sickness

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 03 March 2016
    9 Comments

    Who better to consult than Dr Hippocrates and his humours? Before Tony Abbott's deposition the choleric element dominated in Australia, full of sound and fury. This has been followed by the preponderance of the sanguine humour, expressing itself in that sunny optimism that makes light of problems. But more recent events suggest that the humours are again in chronic imbalance. The core weakness in the Australian constitution has not been removed with the accession of Malcolm Turnbull.

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  • MEDIA

    A fascist by any other name

    • Jeff Sparrow
    • 17 November 2015
    15 Comments

    In journalism, 'he said, she said' often functions as an evasion. Reporters' loyalty should be to accuracy, which isn't about compromise between extremes. When denialists and climate scientists take diametrically opposed stances, the truth doesn't lie somewhere in the middle. Sometimes, one side's right and the other's just wrong. The same can be said of reporting about the rightwing United Patriots Front. While they deny being fascists, that's what they are, and that's what we should call them.

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  • RELIGION

    Church and ordained ministry in the 21st century

    • Frank Brennan
    • 23 May 2013
    2 Comments

    Fr Frank Brennan's keynote address at the Archdiocese of Canberra and Goulburn Clergy Assembly, St Clement's, Gaylong, on 22 May 2013

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  • RELIGION

    On Jesuit collaboration

    • Frank Brennan
    • 26 April 2012
    4 Comments

    'This Jesuit network will not succeed where Copenhagen failed, but it is an incremental contribution to one of the great moral challenges of our age [climate change].' Text from Frank Brennan's paper 'An interpretation and a raincheck on GC 35's call to develop international and interprovincial collaboration', Boston College, 28 April 2012.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Beyond the global storytelling crisis

    • Colm McNaughton
    • 29 March 2010
    10 Comments

    It is becoming clear that we are probably not going to avert cataclysmic forms of climate change. The foundational Greek and Hebraic imaginaries, the mythical narratives that frame western civilisation, can no longer contain, inform and explain what we experience. We need new stories.

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  • EUREKA STREET/ READER'S FEAST AWARD

    People are the answer, not the problem

    • Ruth Limkin
    • 02 December 2009
    7 Comments

    There are those who argue that the fight to stave off the negative impacts of climate change is a fight to save the world from humans themselves. Dialogue from population-control advocates fails to recognise the dignity of each person.

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  • ECONOMICS

    Bankers conspire to cover their assets

    • Les Coleman
    • 22 October 2008
    3 Comments

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that during the past few weeks we have seen a massive manipulation of monetary policy to support US bank stocks. The manipulation has been played out in plain view, which, of course, is the best place to hide a secret.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Gay 'justice' suits pragmatic pollies

    • Deborah Singerman
    • 07 October 2008
    9 Comments

    Gay equality is a touchstone by which to measure politicians' moderate credentials. Turnbull's support is not totally altruistic: the inner-Sydney seat he represents has one of Australia's largest gay and lesbian populations.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Examining the remains

    • Deborah Gare
    • 10 July 2006

    Geoffrey Blainey’s Black Kettle and Full Moon: Daily life in a vanished Australia is a welcome discovery for Deborah Gare.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Curiouser and curiouser

    • Tim Thwaites
    • 19 June 2006

    Curiosity may have been the death of the cat, but it is the lifeblood of science. Recently Archimedes came across two delightful examples of how  human the events leading to advances in scientific research can be.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Tastes of the Orient

    • Christine Salins
    • 14 May 2006

    An interview with Asian culinary master, Rosemary Brissenden, by Christine Salins.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Around the world and back again

    • Matthew Lamb
    • 21 April 2006

    Matthew Lamb on John Ralston Saul’s The Collapse of Globalism: And the Reinvention of the World.

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