keywords: Film Reviews

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Cinema: the secular temple

    • Barbara Creed and Richard Leonard
    • 18 March 2009
    3 Comments

    People have stopped going to church, but they still have an eye for and an expectation of the mystical. At the cinema, spectators, primed by the structures of the cinema itself, enter into a mystical experience with the shadow world being played out before them.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The trouble with free speech

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 12 March 2009
    2 Comments

    A French satirical paper was sued for portraying Muslims as terrorists and labelling them 'jerks'. The editors would have us believe it's a case of free speech versus censorship. But there's more to it than that.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Loving George W. Bush

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 05 March 2009
    4 Comments

    Those who expect a portrait of a monster will be disappointed. Stone's Bush is not exactly sympathetic. But he is human. He is even likeable.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Degrees of guilt in Nicolaides' Thai insult case

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 26 February 2009
    2 Comments

    We received an email from an acquaintance of Harry Nicolaides, a journalist and Eureka Street contributor. Harry had been arrested in Bangkok: 'Publish his story. He is in a bad condition. Please help.' We acted immediately.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Weddings, addictions and embarassing afflictions

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 19 February 2009
    5 Comments

    Idiopathic hyperhydrosis is an unpleasant affliction, and discussion of such does not constitute polite conversation. Kym's affliction is more debilitating: she's an addict, home from rehab to help celebrate her sister's nuptials.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    When Leonard Cohen prays

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 February 2009
    13 Comments

    The world of pop music is dominated by prettiness and skin-deep perfection. In that context, Cohen's greatness is not instantly discernable. Lately a Buddhist, he has spent his latter years in study of religion — 'But cheerfulness keeps breaking through.'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Bushfire TV

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 12 February 2009
    3 Comments

    Kevin Rudd controversially told Channel Nine's Today show that the Victorian firebugs had committed 'mass murder'. Grief and anger compete during such times, and for armchair critics it is often all too easy to take the moral high ground.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    How to escape the hell of suburbia

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 05 February 2009
    6 Comments

    Never mind purgatory: suburbia is hell, barbed with tedious career obligations, awash with too-bright light that leaves the skin looking transluscent, and populated with overly-cheerful, deluded demons. I was raised in the 'burbs, and still live there.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Redeeming the all-American racist

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 29 January 2009
    4 Comments

    To be fair, Walt dislikes everybody. He dismisses the local priest as an 'overeducated 27-year-old virgin' and spews vile, xenophobic slander towards his Hmong refugee neighbours. Walt respects those who can give as good as they get.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    All that jazz

    • Grant Fraser
    • 24 January 2009

    To an outsider jazz might seem a mysterious, prowling place because it defies simple definition. This is a journal for slow reading, recommend to those who are not jazz devotees and do not prowl ... yet.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    No cheap shots in clergy abuse drama

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 22 January 2009
    6 Comments

    On the slimmest of pretexts, fuelled by her own dubious and malicious instincts, Sister Aloysius launches a vendetta against Father Flynn. Doubt deals with the subject of clergy child abuse, though not in the way you might expect.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hunger, pain

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 08 January 2009
    2 Comments

    In life and art Nick Cave is drawn to the potent territory where the sacred meets the profane. Steve McQueen's brutal, beautiful portrait of Irish republican prisoners of an uncaring Thatcher government achieves a similar transcendence. (October 2008)

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