keywords: Film Reviews

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Life as a game show

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 18 December 2008
    1 Comment

    Having grown up an orphan in a Mumbai slum, Jamal is an unlikely candidate for Who Wants To Be A Millionaire. A sense of the divine pervades the film, but while Jamal seems destined for good fortune, his brother Salim diverges towards corruption.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Crabs, cars and Peter Carey

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 11 December 2008
    1 Comment

    Of the notorious Australian low-budget genre films of the 1970s and 1980s, few would feature 'social commentary' as a selling point. But then, few have the distinction of being based on a Peter Carey short story.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hunger, pain

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 30 October 2008
    1 Comment

    In life and art Nick Cave is drawn to the potent territory where the sacred meets the profane. Steve McQueen's brutal, beautiful portrait of Irish republican prisoners of an uncaring Thatcher government achieves a similar transcendence.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Coens' cynical spy spoof

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 23 October 2008
    5 Comments

    It can be hard to spot the villain in a Coen Brothers movie. The ill-fated scheme at the heart of their latest comedy is instigated by Linda, an endearingly goofy gym employee who longs to be able to afford cosmetic surgery.

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  • RELIGION

    Moral relativism's extreme close-up

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 16 October 2008
    2 Comments

    Two people embrace on a verandah. The camera pulls back to disclose a housing estate, with couples embracing on each verandah. Relativism works like the move from close-up to broad perspective in film, by seeming to deflate the significance of what we have just seen.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Wired, profound

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 16 October 2008

    In 1974 French acrobat Philippe Petit balanced mortality and destiny on a wire between New York City's Twin Towers. This documentary imbues Petit's dizzying, existential quest with the dramatic tension of a bank heist.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Dull Duchess

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 02 October 2008

    Famous for being famous, the Duchess of Devonshire is an independent woman in a man's world. A more substantial script might have evoked the subordinate role of women in Western politics, or slyly spoofed the cult of celebrity.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hook turns on weighty subtext

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 25 September 2008

    The characters provide a microcosm of Australia as a fledgling federation. Most poignant is the place of the film's sole Aboriginal character, a gifted pugilist who is ultimately subservient to the purposes of the white characters.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Childlike wonder redeems inscrutable Houdini

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 March 2008

    Tough times call for tough measures — the McGarvie women comprise a single-parent family in a male-dominated society, so you can hardly blame them for making a living the best way they can. Houdini is all charm and showmanship, with hidden depths and dark secrets.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Autism comedy strikes emotional equilibrium

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 06 March 2008

    The Black Balloon's early '90s suburban locale is a tangible and familiar environment, where intolerance and ignorance brood beneath the surface. Lead actor Rhys Wakefield embodies everything that it is to be a teenager on the brink of adulthood.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Young and full of juice

    • Rochelle Siemienowicz
    • 13 December 2007

    The bright eyes of youth often see clearly the things that are wrong with society. 22-year-old Christopher McCandless donates his life savings to Oxfam and sets off on a two-year journey concluding in the isolated wilds of tooth-and-claw Alaska.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    'Best' essays merit book title's reckless superlative

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 13 December 2007

    The recurrence of the ‘big' issues of politics, religion, and sexuality in Best Australian Essays 2007 is predictable enough. But the essays become more interesting when we see particular trends, such as surveillance and the individual's right to privacy, emerge in each.

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