keywords: Melbourne Film Festival

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The mutant homeless

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 08 April 2010

    In comics, the X-Men's 'mutant' powers make them the target of bigotry. They function as a metaphor for homosexuals and other persecuted minorities. In Micmacs, Bazil, ostracised from his 'normal' life by a bizarre crisis, also finds himself on the margins of society.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hitting back at the men who hate women

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 01 April 2010

    Youthful hacker Lisbeth Sallander is capable of great violence. But often her violence is a response to that which has been inflicted upon her. Her investigation of a decades old missing person case will test her capacity for mercy.

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  • RELIGION

    Schooling for a more cohesive society

    • Frank Brennan
    • 19 March 2010
    4 Comments

    The challenges and opportunities are to fund equitably all networks in education and to ensure that robust morale and community engagement are hallmarks of all parts of the network, including state schools and emerging schools such as Muslim schools.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Mixing news and comedy

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 18 March 2010
    1 Comment

    Dave Hughes' presence in the line-up is likely justified more by ratings potential than by any insights he might offer. The good will inherent to The 7pm Project's presentation makes it a positive alternative to other more lecherous, leach-like current affairs programs.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Bringing a spirit of silliness to the War on Terror

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 11 March 2010
    2 Comments

    The soldiers are trained to walk through walls, become invisible and killgoats with only their minds. It's difficult todiscern any particular satirical point to the story aside from the occasionalnod to non-violence and the turtuous capabilities of Barney theDinosaur.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Getting high on war

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 25 February 2010
    1 Comment

    Staff Sergeant William James is responsible for disarming bombs laid by insurgents in the sandy streets of Baghdad. For him, the stress of the job is a veritable amphetamine, and he's well and truly hooked.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Mr Darcy's suicide notes

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 18 February 2010
    2 Comments

    That scene in the BBC's Pride and Prejudice where Mr Darcy emerges from a cathartic swim in his pond still makes many women swoon. Colin Firth's enduring sex appeal is channeled into his latest character, a gay university professor who has decided to commit suicide.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Sympathy for an immoral Arab prophet

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 11 February 2010

    From the moment of Malik's imprisonment he finds that if he is to survive, he needs to choose between conflicting evils. His Muslim roots appear from time to time, but while these moments lend transcendence to the film, they give no moral credence to Malik's actions.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Fatherhood after the apocalypse

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 04 February 2010
    5 Comments

    The blurring of right and wrong in a world where civil structures have disintegrated, is seen in the Man's escalating wildness; his desperation to preserve the life of his son, and his conviction that the end of survival justifies a growing list of dubious means. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Selling short Nelson Mandela and rugby

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 28 January 2010

    Are we to accept that the inspiration of sporting victory is alone sufficient to solve conflict and soothe the way to redemption and rebirth for a divided nation? If so, it must be said that Eastwood's film is history rendered as a fairytale.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Celebrating Aboriginality on the road from Freo to Broome

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 21 January 2010
    6 Comments

    From a patronising priest to a pair of impressionable hippies, the white characters are all doofuses. Bran Nue Dae provides a means for introducing young people to the ongoing impacts of white settlement upon Indigenous Australians.

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  • RELIGION

    Best of 2009: Roman Polanski and clergy sexual abuse

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 14 January 2010
    6 Comments

    The case for Polanski's avoiding extradition has generally received a sympathetic hearing. The same sympathy is not generally shown to clergy who have been tried for less serious acts committed just as many years ago. October 2009

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