keywords: Remote Communities

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Lessons in empathy for racist Australia

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 07 May 2009
    9 Comments

    Samson and Delilah is an ode to Alice Springs and its extremes; an ethereal love story against a backdrop of addiction, violence and displacement. Racism is not an explicit presence, but it is there, a foul breath that muggies the air. 

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Lively history of Quaker service

    • Paul Rule
    • 01 May 2009
    3 Comments

    The variety of Quaker service in Aboriginal communities and around the world is extraordinary. In light of the GFC and climate change, the Quakers' emphasis on small-scale food and water security projects will prove prescient.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Sex and power in the church

    • Frank Brennan
    • 13 April 2009
    4 Comments

    Bishop Geoffrey Robinson's book is an invitation to put fear behind us. Given the treatment it has received by people who should have known better, it has become an icon; a call to conversation without fear.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Human rights without God

    • Frank Brennan
    • 27 February 2009
    3 Comments

    Professor Martha Nussbaum's recent book Liberty of Conscience provides a rich textured treatment of the place of religion in the public square. If God is taken out of the picture, it may be difficult to maintain a human rights commitment to the weakest and most despised in society.

    READ MORE
  • ECONOMICS

    Workers' solution for fallen childcare empire

    • Cameron Durnsford
    • 03 December 2008
    4 Comments

    After the 2001 Argentine economic disaster, workers' collectives organised to autonomously run their enterprises. The collapse of the ABC Learning empire should not be seen as a total calamity, despite the obvious potential for fallout.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Educating leaders for the contemporary Australian Church

    • Frank Brennan
    • 06 October 2008

    'Lee and Christine Rush are your average Ozzie couple, except that their teenage son Scott is on death row in Bali having been convicted of being a hapless drug mule. It will not go down well on the streets of Jakarta if Australians are baying for the blood of the Bali bombers one month and then pleading to save our sons and daughters the next month.'

    READ MORE
  • MARGARET DOOLEY AWARD

    Learning to teach Aboriginal kids

    • Jonathan Hill
    • 10 September 2008
    5 Comments

    Teachers arriving in remote Aboriginal schools represent merely the latest in a long, transient line. What will separate them from their predecessors is their ability to listen and learn from the people whose land they now live on.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Abbott's complex Aboriginal odyssey

    • Brian McCoy
    • 04 September 2008
    11 Comments

    The news Tony Abbott would spend three weeks in a remote Aboriginal community came as a pleasant surprise to many. He gave himself a chance to learn, and his reflections reveal a genuine interest in the lives of the people.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Indigenous summiteers put dreams into practice

    • Frank Brennan
    • 30 April 2008
    7 Comments

    The abuse of children in remote communities has been the catalyst for revising romantic notion of land rights and self-determination. 2020 summiteers were allowed to dream and strategise about closing gaps while wondering how best to recognise the enduring rights of indigenous Australians.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Bricks and mortar don't care for children

    • Daniel Donahoo
    • 23 April 2008
    3 Comments

    The Prime Minister's proposal for 'one-stop shop' child and parent centres is a big idea, but not a new one. All those early childhood advocates busily patting themselves on the back for getting their issues back on the front page should demand more for the youngest Australians.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    After apology, it's back to the future

    • Brian McCoy
    • 27 February 2008
    17 Comments

    The missionaries thought the removal of children 'for education' was both the good and only thing to do. Modern attitudes reflect old ones, especially when people enter Aboriginal communities with a set of ready-made answers around employment, health and education.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Aboriginal art before it became an industry

    • Rosemary Crumlin
    • 22 January 2008

    At Turkey Creek, George Mung had carved a statue out of a piece of tree, a work of extraordinary beauty. Here it was, sitting on top of a hot-water system. 'You take it,' he said, 'I'll do another one.' (Eureka Street March 1991)

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up