Keywords: Spotlight

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    When feminism goes green

    • Jen Vuk
    • 22 May 2009
    5 Comments

    In the age of equal opportunity and unisex underwear, the feminist movement seems as incendiary as a cup of tea. Then there's ecofeminism, which argues that 'the domination of women and the domination of nature are fundamentally connected'.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Caroline Jones' manual for love and loss

    • Cassandra Golds
    • 15 May 2009
    1 Comment

    Jones' working life has been devoted to stories. In Through A Glass Darkly, she tells of her father's death. Her account questions the experiences behind modern medical miracles, and acts as a guide for understanding suffering and grief.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The gospel according to Dostoevsky

    • Cassandra Golds
    • 24 April 2009
    1 Comment

    That Dostoevsky is said to have developed a 'theology of writing' does not mean he arrives forearmed with a set of dogmatic truths. Rather, he practises the narrative and spritual discipline of allowing each character to be heard.

    READ MORE
  • INFORMATION

    Fable of the furtive veteran

    • Mick O’Donnell
    • 24 April 2009
    1 Comment

    There he was, this hunched over figure of a man, sitting in one of the furthermost pews, detached, eyes withdrawn, his face pale, features old and weather beaten. John O'Malley was always a mystery.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Moveable monument to the transience of childhood

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 05 June 2008

    The magic of Flight of the Red Balloon is its delicate approach to exposition. Details are revealed gradually, like a photo blooming in a darkroom. Simon's carefree childishness shines in contrast with the complexity of the adults' lives.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Mining the heartache of lead contamination

    • Margaret Rice
    • 06 May 2008
    3 Comments

    Mt Isa in Queensland is currently experiencing 'lead-alert'. Lead absorption in mining towns affects children the most. Inevitably, the families who are better off will move, leaving the most vulnerable to stay and live with the problem.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Power Point can make it zing

    • Chris Andrews
    • 25 March 2008

    We are all unique individuals but there aren't that many positions in the field.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Greed infects the gentleman's game

    • Hector Welgampola
    • 14 March 2008
    1 Comment

    While the reputation of cricket has survived match fixing, doping, secret commissions and money laundering in the past, its status as the gentleman's game appears to be relegated to history. An editorial in Sri Lanka's Daily News asked whether cricket will come to be regulated on the stock market.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Australia's rank river embodies land-use dilemma

    • Margaret Simons
    • 20 February 2008
    7 Comments

    The onset of blue-green algae caused the Murray's smell to change from rank to fetid. Halting the damage to the Murray-Darling basin is essential to our financial survival, yet it may be that it is impossible to stop the damage without also causing critical economic damage. — Eureka Street, March 1993

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Wilberforce film points to task of modern abolitionists

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 09 January 2008

    This year marks the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in Britain. Social justice organisations around the world are using the film Amazing Grace to put a spotlight on the modern trade in human trafficking. From 25 July 2007.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    'Best' essays merit book title's reckless superlative

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 13 December 2007

    The recurrence of the ‘big' issues of politics, religion, and sexuality in Best Australian Essays 2007 is predictable enough. But the essays become more interesting when we see particular trends, such as surveillance and the individual's right to privacy, emerge in each.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Lawyers' role in a democracy

    • Frank Brennan
    • 29 November 2007

    The power of the State can be exercised capriciously and unaccountably when the “Don’t ask; don’t tell” approach to government is immune from parliamentary, judicial or public scrutiny. It is the task of lawyers to make it more difficult for politicians to take this approach.

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up