keywords: The Joy Of Being Wrong

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  • RELIGION

    The gifts of being a priest with a disability

    • Justin Glyn
    • 17 October 2019
    15 Comments

    In some ways to be a priest with a disability is to be at a strange advantage. We tend to think about priesthood as a gift and a calling — and so it is. It is not, however, about merit, of saying 'I am better than you / uniquely gifted'. Instead, it is a call to enter the hurts and joys of other people's lives from a position of weakness, not strength.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The indispensable joy of time spent alone

    • Neve Mahoney
    • 24 April 2019
    9 Comments

    It's liberating to buy a ticket for one. To not have to coordinate times with someone, but do things by my own schedule. To go see the niche movie none of my friends wants to see, or the art exhibition I forgot was in town until its last day. But alone time isn't just something I do because I like it. I need it.

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  • EDUCATION

    The joys of teaching adult refugees

    • Paulette Smythe
    • 25 May 2018
    15 Comments

    I often feel I have the best job on the planet. Teaching English to adult refugees should be a daunting task. Yet these classes are especially warm and congenial places to be. Human beings at their most vulnerable possess an extraordinary fund of light and laughter despite, or perhaps because of, the darkness they have left behind.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The joys and terrors of a mum left home alone

    • Jen Vuk
    • 10 October 2017
    2 Comments

    On the day of their departure I covered their faces with kisses. A dark cloud seemed to settle. For the last ten years I'd been a mother. What was I without them? My first impulse was to get busy filling my social calendar. But something stopped me. Somehow I knew I was just trying to stave off the inevitable: having to spend time with myself.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The joys and risks of reading in bed

    • Brian Doyle
    • 07 April 2010
    5 Comments

    As a society we fail our children if we do not carefully remove our street clothes, don cotton pyjamas, and crawl into the boat of the bed with a sigh of delight, each and every night, there to voyage, UnKindled, BlackBerryless, PalmPilotless, into the glory of story.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    A sign of hope for the Rohingya people

    • Bree Alexander
    • 31 January 2020

    On 23 January, the International Court of Justice handed down an unprecedented unanimous decision on provisional measures in the case of The Gambia v Myanmar. While the judgement has given hope to some, the Rohingya population still remains largely in dismal and precarious refugee camp conditions.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The theatre of distance

    • John Allison
    • 25 November 2019
    2 Comments

    I dreamed Thoreau told me that whenever I was lost, if only I'd remember that it was not I but simply those familiar places of the world that were lost then I would realise at last the trick of standing upright here ... Everywhere, departure opens wide its gates into the nothing that awaits us in the dusk

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In praise of the rituals of others

    • Jane Williams
    • 04 November 2019
    1 Comment

    Thank God for Bollywood and daytime TV. For the all night partyers and marathon love makers. For the hash brownie bakers, the nut crackers and pot-stirrers ... the drum-beating banjo-twanging wannabe musicians ... the incense wafting up from the first floor through our bathroom vent — frankincense I'm tempted to think.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Horse slaughter and the ethics of animal welfare

    • Moira Rayner
    • 21 October 2019
    15 Comments

    When the ABC published footage of cruel treatment of healthy former racehorses in a Qld abattoir, everyone said they were appalled. This revelation has again brought into the public eye the dirty secret about the business of horse breeding and trading, gambling and associated industries. They are vast, and they are important.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Rewriting the fairy tales of disability

    • Justin Glyn
    • 07 October 2019
    7 Comments

    Beginning with the origins of the fairy story and with her own diagnosis with cerebral palsy, Leduc opens the question of why disability in fairy stories is a trope when, for many of us, it is just a fact of life. What follows is a fascinating exploration of how fairy stories socialise us into particular expectations — of ourselves and of society.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The cult of certainty caught by cricket chaos

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 04 September 2019
    3 Comments

    In a combative world where even sport is as joyless as was trench warfare in another age, the quirky ending of the Headingly cricket Test was an unexpected delight. The events prompt wider reflection on the broader quest for certainty in human affairs, and the consequent impatience with human judgment.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The sometimes ironic perception of 'things'

    • Brian Matthews
    • 02 August 2019
    4 Comments

    Robert Harris' The Gang of One ranges through Harris' five published books and a number of uncollected poems. Early work grows from his occasionally lonely, knockabout life and reveals not only a talent for catching the essence of fleeting memories and perceptions but also a mordant touch that gives edge to memory.

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