Vol 18 No 2

21 January 2008


 

  • INTERNATIONAL

    Caste complicates progress for India's Dalits

    • Peter Hodge
    • 01 February 2008
    1 Comment

    There is a link between improved living conditions of Dalits and increased abuse at the hands of extremist Hindus. With these groups unlikely to back down, further empowerment will come at a cost.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Deep spirituality underlies gay Catholic's activism

    • Terry Monagle
    • 01 February 2008
    11 Comments

    Michael Bernard Kelly undergoes the personal struggle to reconcile his own deep faith with being proudly gay. He then takes up the fight for acceptance of gays in the Catholic Church.

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  • RELIGION

    Cricket viewed from the Tower of Babel

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 31 January 2008
    7 Comments

    Tuesday was being described as cricket's "day of shame" following the Harbhajan Singh verdict. A look at the Tower of Babel encourages us to ask whether the problem is that technological changes have distorted the human relationships on which cricket relies.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Oppression by unresolved grief

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 31 January 2008
    1 Comment

    Sweeney Todd is a cautionary tale, but it's more than that. Todd's ultimatetragedy is that his all-consuming quest for revenge blinds him to thethings that could make him happy again.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Bush constructing legacy as peacemaker

    • Kylie Baxter
    • 29 January 2008

    Legacy was never far from the surface during the State of the Union address delivered yesterday by President George W. Bush. For him, the temptation to solve the complex Palestinian-Israeli conflict has proven irresistible.

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  • RELIGION

    Different song, but new Jesuit leader 'on message'

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 29 January 2008

    Recently elected Jesuit Superior General Fr Adolfo Nicolás briefed journalists earlier this week. While a comparison with a recent speech of Pope Benedict points to a difference in method, there is a singleness of purpose.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Photographing Australia's humanitarian response

    • Various
    • 28 January 2008
    1 Comment

    A new exhibition of compelling and confronting photographs captures the impact of natural disasters and other humanitarian emergencies, and the crucial role of Australian aid workers and volunteers in the initial response and longer term rebuilding process.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Australia's answer to the Great Firewall of China

    • Kirstyn McDermott
    • 28 January 2008

    The Government's Clean Feed initiative will allow families to surf the Net without risk of stumbling upon adult content. But there is real concern that the definition of inappropriate content could be widened.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Truth about Aboriginal missions requires study

    • Robin Koning
    • 24 January 2008
    14 Comments

    Too often, generic statements about missionaries colluding with colonialism and destroying indigenous cultures are presumed to say all that needs to be said. Detailed study of mission history is essential if we are to move beyond the clichés.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Nationalist zealots stealing Australia Day

    • Tom Cranitch
    • 24 January 2008
    18 Comments

    National Australia Day Council chair Lisa Curry Kenny says Australia Day "reminds us to embrace our difference and celebrate friendship". It would be nice if this were true. In fact Australian nationalists are increasingly using the day to promote the perceived certainties of a rather dubious monoculture.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Future doctor's challenge to Federal Health Minister

    • Matthew Dobson
    • 23 January 2008
    5 Comments

    More money will not necessarily buy quality healthcare system. How funding is spent is critical. Despite the spending disparity, health outcomes in the United States are comparable to those of Costa Rica.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Afghan stranger's homecoming

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 23 January 2008

    Amir returns home to confront the guilt from his childhood. He finds the Taliban is in power, and his home city of Kabul lies in waste. The film's heavy-handed pathos detracts from the political sub-plot.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Aboriginal art before it became an industry

    • Rosemary Crumlin
    • 22 January 2008

    At Turkey Creek, George Mung had carved a statue out of a piece of tree, a work of extraordinary beauty. Here it was, sitting on top of a hot-water system. 'You take it,' he said, 'I'll do another one.' (Eureka Street March 1991)

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Howard mandarins capturing Labor ministers

    • Tony Kevin
    • 22 January 2008
    2 Comments

    Last week, Immigration Minister Senator Chris Evans paid a little-publicised visit to Jakarta for talks with ministerial counterparts on border control and people smuggling. The circumstances suggest Evans could be out of his depth, and at risk of policy capture by his department.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The Republicans' dark horse

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 21 January 2008
    1 Comment

    Republican candidate Mike Huckabee has had little by way of party machinery or fundraising acumen. But he managed to storm home in the Republican ballot, roping in not merely the evangelicals but disaffected low-income voters.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Still following through

    • P. S. Cottier
    • 21 January 2008

    When I turned twenty I thought the world could be changed like a pair of jeans ... At forty, I realised I'd better decide what I'd be when I grew up.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    2008 up and rolling

    • Michael Mullins
    • 20 January 2008
    14 Comments

    Eureka Street joins other online publications in beginning the new year with a fresh roll of the dice, publishing daily instead of fortnightly.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Idealists don't own cricket

    • Tony Smith
    • 20 January 2008
    2 Comments

    Cricket is a microcosm of society and the furore over sportsmanship reflects the division of Australia into two classes — the venal, whose ultimate measure of success is the potential for profit, and the naïve, who believe in higher values.

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