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Vol 34 No 7

08 April 2024


 

  • AUSTRALIA

    Australia's dysfunctional housing quagmire

    • Peter Mares
    • 12 April 2024

    The ABC’s recent Q+A housing special left many questions unasked and unanswered. Labor, Coalition and Green MPs all say they want more people to be able to buy their own homes. The most obvious way to achieve that would be to reduce the price of housing. Yet no politician will make that an explicit policy aim.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Between sense and sensation

    • Nathan Scolaro
    • 11 April 2024

    Can a chatbot write a poem? The answer reveals something about the heart of human interaction. True connection, like true poetry, requires discomfort, vulnerability and a richness of experience that defies the simplicity of algorithms.  

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    When war becomes personal

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 10 April 2024

    Our attitudes to war change drastically when it becomes personal. The killing of Zomi Frankcom, together with other members of the Charity organisation World Central Kitchen, made the war between Israel and Hamas personal. It has led many people to see the destruction of Gaza and its people as not only regrettable but intolerable.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    By the world forgot

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 10 April 2024

    For the men in these conflicts, there was an expectation they would resume the lives they had left behind as if nothing had happened, as if they had been on an extended business trip. It calls to mind a phrase that has become common in recent years: unexamined trauma.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The Dinner Guest

    • Damian Balassone
    • 09 April 2024

    The rhetoric of elites / sets off his built-in shit detector. He much prefers to eat / with hookers, drunks and tax collectors.

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  • RELIGION

    The optimism of Timothy Radcliffe

    • John Warhurst
    • 09 April 2024

    Timothy Radcliffe has a hopeful vision for the Church, yet noting the slow pace of institutional change in his recent visit to Australia, he presented a sort of optimism that eschewed any hope for immediate outcomes. The basis for Radcliffe’s optimism seems to be his assumption that it is acceptable for the Church to take its time. 

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Kate Middleton and the end of all boundaries

    • Laura Kings
    • 09 April 2024

    In a world where the public appetite for private news on public figures is insatiable, how do we foster ethical media behaviour that respects privacy and dignity in situations like this? Would well-wishes for Kate's recovery, even before her diagnosis was public, have been too much to ask?

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