ARTS AND CULTURE

Section: ARTS AND CULTURE

If there are more than 100 matches, only the first 100 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Is it too hard to have a career in the arts?

    • Amelia Paxman
    • 14 June 2018
    13 Comments

    The slow, heartbreaking realisation that unfolded over a year or more was that none of this — the heavy glass trophy, breathing the same air as popular TV hosts, sitting at those fancy tables — would change anything. It was an elaborate farce, and I was still a nobody in a struggling ecosystem.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Outback Australia after the plague

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 11 June 2018

    With the downfall of white society, Thoomi and other Aboriginal people have abandoned their white-established communities, to return to the land. Through embracing ancient communal practices, they are proving far more resilient than their white counterparts. It is through them that Andy may ultimately discover the key to survival.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Fractured family in the house of grief

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 05 June 2018
    1 Comment

    The pressure starts to get to Annie when she begins to suspect her mother is haunting her. This exacerbates pre-existing tensions; her husband is caring in a mildly condescending way, but is more concerned with the wellbeing of their children. Is the haunting real, then, or just a symptom of Annie's reluctance to let go?

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Submission to the elements

    • Tony London
    • 03 June 2018
    4 Comments

    Winter fronts roll through, we have had our tongues out for rain, genuflected in case it may have helped, and now another scud rattling on the tin roof, gutters run over like a gushing bereavement.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Ted Kennedy's darkest hour

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 29 May 2018
    2 Comments

    Chappaquiddick notes the effects of these expectations on Ted's actions, without sympathising. 'I'm not going to be president,' he murmurs, by way of announcing Kopechne's death to Gargan. He comes off as more pathetic than Machiavellian, the future Liberal Lion rarely having the courage of his convictions.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Remembering the many-sided Brian Doyle

    • Philip Harvey
    • 27 May 2018
    3 Comments

    The evidence, from one line onwards, was unmistakeable Doyle. Imitation was impossible, self-parody ditto. Gore Vidal loved to say that Tennessee Williams knew how to do only one thing, but he did that thing better than anyone else. Brian Doyle's poetry was a bit like that.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    If we ever got to be what we so want to be

    • Brian Doyle
    • 23 May 2018
    2 Comments

    'It's hard for a guy to cry endlessly and helplessly. It is. Some remote part of you shouts Man, get it together, this is totally beyond the bounds. But I couldn't stop.' Four previously unpublished poems by Portland author Brian Doyle, who died on 27 May last year.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Gurrumul's gift to the world

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 22 May 2018
    5 Comments

    At the time of his death in July last year, Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu was the most commercially successful Aboriginal Australian musician to ever grace this world. Anyone expecting Gurrumul to resemble anything like your typical popular music documentary will be quickly dissuaded. Gurrumul was a far cry from your typical popular musician.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A painter's lament

    • Clotilde Lopez
    • 20 May 2018
    1 Comment

    If you listen carefully, the sound of each colour can be heard, the scrunch of each mineral discerned, each cadence, a trace of its former life, a finer distinction. Relieved of its cumbersome form, it becomes lighter and mixes with white spirit like a cocktail blast of violets, mauves and ochres, ground to a fine powder and wet with new life.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A heartbreaking tribute to the work mothers do

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 15 May 2018
    2 Comments

    Tully is a funny film, with a serious core: a tribute to the labour of child rearing, a dissection of the substantial physical and emotional burden of this work, and a 'show-don't-tell' critique of the social norms that frequently sees that burden fall, still, primarily on women.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    PC is reviving comedy, not killing it

    • Neve Mahoney
    • 15 May 2018
    11 Comments

    The views of Kevin 'Bloody' Wilson and Rodney Rude can be summed up in the quote: 'The soft new generation of PC-wary comedians need to grow some balls.' There seems to be a sense that comedy isn't funny nowadays unless it's offensive. But it's more than possible to create comedy that avoids this. In fact, it can be better.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Chelsea Manning at Guangzhou Airport

    • Barnaby Smith
    • 13 May 2018
    1 Comment

    ... the actuality of Her and me growing dimmer as the distorted glow of a new morning's haze illuminates factories in the distance as if deleted scenes ...

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