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Keywords: Ey

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • INTERNATIONAL

    Commemorate or forget: Do we care enough about D-Day?

    • Geraldine Doogue
    • 18 June 2024

    I wonder how many Australians were captivated, as was I, by the 80th anniversary D-Day celebrations? They seemed epochal to me: a reminder of something remarkable and a pointer to something possible, namely new resolve to maintain peace in Europe. Not too many Australians, as it turned out, were similarly mesmerised. 

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Hanging in with refugees

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 17 June 2024

    Like all other persons, refugees  cannot be defined in numbers. Nor can they be defined by their condition as refugees. They are human beings like us who belong to families, their hearts are free, and they long for the freedom to live human lives, to work and follow their dreams.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Are boot camps a solution or a symptom?

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 03 June 2024

    Children should certainly be protected from many experiences that they might enter more safely as adults. But should we not also ask if adults should also be shared these harmful experiences? If social media, nicotine and alcohol are harmful to children, should they be allowed for anyone? 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In praise of the human kind

    • Ken Haley
    • 31 May 2024

    Social psychologist Hugh Mackay has been people-watching for more than 60 years. At 86 he has published The Way We Are: Lessons from a lifetime of listening, a compendium of his choicest insights on Australian life quarter-way through the new century.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Neither seen nor heard

    • John Falzon
    • 30 May 2024

    In a signature essay published last year in The Monthly, Treasurer Chalmers staked out an ideological terrain he described as ‘values-based capitalism.’ The Budget 2024 is quite the big reveal on what those values include and who they exclude. In it, the people who have borne the brunt of inequality and precarity are neither seen nor heard. 

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Lessons from our failure to build a constitutional bridge in the 2023 Referendum

    • Frank Brennan
    • 27 May 2024

    Following the failure of the Voice referendum, many believed that the path to constitutional recognition is closed for Indigenous Australians. But they may be wrong. 

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  • RELIGION

    How Jung turned grief into a philosophy of life

    • Barry Gittins
    • 21 May 2024

    When friends faced a heartbreaking loss, they found solace in Carl Jung's writings, granting them permission to grieve and hope. Given his life of contradictions, how should we evaluate Jung's contributions and his complex relationship with religious faith?

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Under pressure from High Court and Dutton, government rushes immigration bill

    • Frank Brennan
    • 13 May 2024

    The Albanese government’s refugee and asylum policy is in a mess. When Minister Giles introduced his Migration Amendment Bill, they bypassed typical parliamentary procedures, wanting to be seen as tougher than Peter Dutton in getting unvisaed non-citizens out of the country. It’s time for the government to return to due process in this whole field. 

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  • ECONOMICS

    War is bad economics but very good business

    • David James
    • 09 May 2024

    There is money to be made in war, especially from making weapons, and what we are witnessing at the moment in Ukraine and the Middle East is simply the latest episode in a story that goes back centuries.

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  • ECONOMICS

    The biggest untold story in the history of money

    • David James
    • 03 May 2024

    It is a truism to say that the way money is constructed defines the power structure under which we live. But allowing private actors to manipulate and game the financial system has not just given them extraordinary power, it has undermined the way money itself is understood.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    In constant repair

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 02 May 2024

    Where would we be without our friends? Good friends sustain us for decades through good times and bad and steer us through periods of change and crisis. One of the many downsides of old age is the loss of friends: they become ill and die. What to do then? How to cope?

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Is a child terrorist a victim or perpetrator?

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 02 May 2024

    To identify children as terrorists is a distraction from considering the broader social and psychological contexts that made this violent ideology seem reasonable. The larger task in investigating how they became exposed to that violent ideology, how they were attracted to it, and how they can be drawn away from it.

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