keywords: Poetry

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The case for publishing poetry

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 20 May 2009
    6 Comments

    Les Murray describes himself as a poet who is religious rather than a religious poet, and celebrates a sense of wonder and mystery. In an increasingly secular age, poetry has a new function as an alternative or complement to religion.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Demerit points for bad poetry

    • Brian Doyle
    • 06 May 2009
    4 Comments

    It is a useful truth that every real feat is built on a mountain of failures. The price for poetry's occasional power is the ocean of self-indulgent, mewling muck produced and published annually under the tattered banner of the Poem.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Bits of poetry

    • Shane McCauley
    • 30 September 2008
    4 Comments

    I untie one small corner .. of the mosquito-net .. and the whole moon .. enters. Without the magician's .. electric hand .. clay's heart might beat  

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Recovering Jesus through poetry

    • Philip Harvey
    • 02 April 2007

    John Deane grew up in Catholic Ireland, which has now seen the Church questioned and rejected. But unlike those who have walked away, Deane goes to poetry to help pick up the pieces of a broken religion.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Art into poetry

    • Peter Steele
    • 25 April 2006

    Peter Porter is one contemporary poet who breathes new life into existing works of art by letting them speak in the language of poetry

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  • RELIGION

    Pondering God from the dunny

    • Sue Stevenson
    • 24 January 2020

    As I sat I noticed some graffiti: 'What you are seeking after is seeking after you. — Rumi.' A beautiful, soulful verse for the alienated children of late capitalism, right? An invitation to live in expectancy, as if you belong in the world. But underneath, someone had struck through What and written Who, and Rumi and written God.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Ormiston Gorge revelation

    • James Orrock
    • 20 January 2020

    Rest in late afternoon silence, the vision quest in flight / Red ramparts attenuate to pink mauve in muted light; / Only gold could slake the Depression fever of Lewis Lasseter / Lead to an alchemy of empty jam tins and broken beer bottles / Fibula and femur disjoint, wrecked on iron pyrite reefs.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Fire poems

    • Bill Rush, Rory Harris, Collen Keating
    • 13 January 2020
    2 Comments

    It's as though it's suddenly turned winter, the way the earth is covered over and the grey stretch of ash is drawn up to its chin like a blanket. And though it's day, the bird-less quiet is a kind of night, and everything we ever thought we knew has been turned upside down, the first now last, and the last first.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Notre Dame de Paris

    • Marlene Marburg, Grant Fraser
    • 16 December 2019
    3 Comments

    It rose in its tall verticals from the grace and welcome of the earth, / That swooned far, far below, / As canny masons hefted the limestone / Into vast beatitudes of grace; / Shipwrights inverted their minds to groom the oak, / So that it would soar, / As if a celtic monk had charmed a serpent into a holy phrase.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The arts as a human right

    • Bree Alexander
    • 11 December 2019
    4 Comments

    While we can only speculate on what it means for the future of funding beyond the current budget, alarm bells are ringing for many of us who recognise the symbolic power of rendering the arts invisible at a federal level. A strong, vibrant arts sector is essential to a thriving democracy.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    This delicious failure of common names

    • Paul Hetherington
    • 09 December 2019
    2 Comments

    You don't know the word for butter, so you spend seconds miming the way it froths in the pan. The owner of the shop says nothing. You want to buy their famous pesto, but it's nowhere on display. You speak to other customers, who nod and frown. Eventually you point at fragrant cheese and a melon that smells of ripest green.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Two elegies for a vanished farm

    • Jena Woodhouse
    • 02 December 2019

    After spirit-lamps were doused the house drew in upon itself; its clutch of dreamers moaned and tossed in stifling mosquito nets — each isolating sac of mesh a Magellanic cloud.

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