Vol 28 No 12

17 June 2018


 

  • INTERNATIONAL

    US must find its moral voice after 'baby jails'

    • Zac Davis
    • 27 June 2018
    5 Comments

    Even if all of the families that have been coldly, clinically, 'legally' torn apart can be reunited, much of the damage done is likely irreparable. Social workers and scientists have spoken out on the permanent damage inflicted on children separated from their parents. But who will speak on the scar left on the national conscience?

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  • ECONOMICS

    Burning down the house of inequality

    • John Falzon
    • 27 June 2018
    7 Comments

    If you accept the tenets of individualism, you are going to struggle to see why we should have anything but the most minimal level of taxation, and you wouldn't hold that taxation should be progressive to be fair. But the reality is that inequality is a political failure; not a personal one.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Portrait of a killer at school

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 26 June 2018

    My Friend Dahmer, based on the memoir by John Backderf about his teenage friendship with the soon-to-be killer, is a complex character study of which Dahmer's troubled home life, repressed homosexuality, abuse of alcohol, and experiences of bullying and social alienation are motley features rather than defining characteristics.

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  • MEDIA

    Trickle-down white feminism doesn't cut it

    • Laura La Rosa
    • 26 June 2018
    14 Comments

    #MeToo, a movement founded and nurtured by Tarana Burke (a civil rights activist and a woman of colour), was intended to be collective and accessible. By contrast, in Australia we are seeing a mainstream picture of women's liberation that ignores a longstanding struggle for diversity, genuine inclusiveness and radicalism.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Civilisation beyond the con of neoliberalism

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 25 June 2018
    35 Comments

    Just in time to arrest ponderous musings about Western Civilisation, up jumps Denniss' cheeky funeral oration for the neoliberal settlement. His target is the assumption that an economy based on unregulated competition between individuals will benefit society. He does not spend time arguing with the theory, but points to the results.

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  • CARTOON

    The care factor

    • Fiona Katauskas
    • 25 June 2018
    1 Comment

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Chickpeas and peace in the Middle East

    • Na'ama Carlin
    • 25 June 2018
    2 Comments

    'If only we could sit down with Palestinians for a bowl of hummus, all the problems would be solved,' says my Israeli friend, as we wipe hummus down with warm pita. He isn't the first to say this. Indeed, a film was made about the virtues of hummus, which asked if a regional love of hummus be the recipe for peace. Personally, I'm not so sure.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Police still failing Aboriginal women

    • Celeste Liddle
    • 24 June 2018
    24 Comments

    How many more times are we going to see people get away with murder because police fail to value the lives and liberties of Aboriginal women enough to ensure they do their jobs? Will everyday Australians ever care enough to pressure these systems for justice for Aboriginal women?

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Keep this message with you forever

    • William Okello Kadima
    • 24 June 2018

    I know we are a cultured society that forbids ever talking about 'if tomorrow never comes'. But tomorrow is never a promise to anyone.

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  • EDUCATION

    The myth of the average teacher

    • Tim Hutton
    • 21 June 2018
    12 Comments

    I have the controversial opinion among my colleagues that teachers, on average, actually get paid pretty well. Averaging, however, is the crux of debate. Yes, if a teacher's job is averaged over the year, their pay is reasonable and their workload is manageable. Alas, teachers are mere mortals; they aren't Time Lords who can redistribute their work to a time of year when they are less busy.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    An old poet scales the age barrier

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 19 June 2018
    11 Comments

    An old man boarded the bus, seating himself next to me and behind the boys. He was unshaven, and his jeans had seen better days. He sat quietly for a few minutes, observing the scene, and then he tapped the nearest boy on the shoulder. 'I'm impressed by your enthusiasm, and it so happens I've written a poem about that subject. Here it is.'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Finding hope in shared struggle after trauma

    • ZoĆ« Krupka
    • 19 June 2018
    1 Comment

    Using memoir as a kind of litmus, Atkinson challenges the myth that traumatic events are socially 'out of character' and asks us to look at how by its very nature, patriarchy demands the abuse of its most vulnerable citizens.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Man with secret lives

    • David Lander
    • 19 June 2018
    2 Comments

    When I drink coffee I roll it over my tongue and remember how I grew the beans myself on my own plantations in Guatamala. I hope my secret family there is doing well. I captain this battleship in tight formation with destroyers and frigates. My contemporary dance company is in constant demand. I am a busy man but I sleep well.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    What is Western Civilisation anyway?

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 19 June 2018
    60 Comments

    The dispute about the Ramsay Centre Foundation for Western Civilisation had everything for those who like pub brawls. The question least discussed but most intriguing is precisely what is meant by Western Civilisation. Protagonists praised or damned its ideological associations, but rarely troubled to share their understanding of it.

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  • MEDIA

    Attacks against the ABC are undemocratic

    • Fatima Measham
    • 19 June 2018
    20 Comments

    There is political hay to be made in convincing the right that the ABC has a leftward bias. The strategy counts on short memories. When Labor was in power, it would routinely complain that, in being too stringent with government, the ABC was aiding the Coalition. This only suggests that the ABC does its job, no matter who is in charge.

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  • CARTOON

    The ABC balancing act

    • Fiona Katauskas
    • 18 June 2018
    1 Comment

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Parents, it's time to spike the spank

    • Barry Gittins
    • 18 June 2018
    4 Comments

    If you are inclined to discount expert opinion from medicos, lawyers and criminologists, you could consider the evidence of your own eyes. Observe the body language around you if a parent hits their kid in public. A hush descends and tension increases. Post-Royal Commission, violence against kids is more and more on the nose.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Trump summit a PR coup for Kim

    • Erin Cook
    • 17 June 2018
    6 Comments

    There is no basis for this claim that, if the summit and its outcomes had occurred under Barack Obama, some have argued, those on the centre left would be cheering. The reality is, the summit would never have occurred, because no other president would have made the concession of a meeting at all for no apparent gain.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Independents and micro party success stories

    • John Warhurst
    • 17 June 2018
    6 Comments

    The contrast between success and failure shows that successful independents and minor parties cannot just be based on major party disillusionment, creative election campaigns, or attractive candidates, but also on deep listening to and engaging with their communities which enable a positive and grounded alternative to be offered to voters.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Tunisia's women strive for equal rights

    • Oliver Friendship
    • 14 June 2018
    1 Comment

    Article 21 of Tunisia's 2014 constitution makes this document pivotal in the broader fight for gender equality across the Arab world. Even so, more than four years on from the constitution's inception, progress is slow in the struggle for equal rights in Tunisia, and the fight for basic equality between the sexes is still ongoing.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Is it too hard to have a career in the arts?

    • Amelia Paxman
    • 14 June 2018
    17 Comments

    The slow, heartbreaking realisation that unfolded over a year or more was that none of this — the heavy glass trophy, breathing the same air as popular TV hosts, sitting at those fancy tables — would change anything. It was an elaborate farce, and I was still a nobody in a struggling ecosystem.

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  • RELIGION

    What religions really say about suicide

    • Rachel Woodlock
    • 14 June 2018
    13 Comments

    Amid the shock and grief for Anthony Bourdain's death, one blue-tick Twitterer attempted to capture five minutes of shameful fame, declaring that religious people believe hell or purgatory is his afterworld destination. While all the great religious traditions generally proscribe suicide, they also contain nuanced views of the suicide's fate.

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